fish farming service Articles

  • Ecosystem management planning for farm conversion - case study

    Based on a survey that revealed unexpected plant and animal treasures, we developed an ecosystem management plan to harmonise activity with the environment. Based on a survey that revealed unexpected plant and animal treasures on a Western Cape Farm, we developed an ecosystem management plan to harmonise economic activity with the natural environment. Voorhoede Farm near Caledon in the ...

  • From factory to farm – industry opportunities for surplus food

    Food waste management is a common topic in the industry, as manufacturers and retailers strive to improve their environmental compliance and, ultimately, their profitability. But in line with the increasingly popular concept of the circular economy, specialist surplus food recycler SugaRich is working with producers and stores, large and small, to show that this ...


    By SugaRich

  • Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield?

    City-based agriculture produces 15 to 20 percent of food globally. In the U.S., its benefits go far beyond nutrition. This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit investigative news organization. ...


    By Ensia

  • ITAS - Norway

    The Norwegian company ITAS (Instrumentation Services A/S), started as part of the Research Council of Norway in 1970, is located at the Agricultural University at Aas (south of Oslo). Since 1991, ITAS has been operating as an independent company specializing in field measurements as well as providing for communications, data retrieval and web service. ITAS has deep roots in the academic world but ...


    By Vista Data Vision

  • Composting In rural Alaska

    Gardeners, communities and commercial enterprises have proven that composting works in Alaska, especially given large quantities of fish waste and diminishing landfill capacity. ALASKA is two and a half times larger than the largest state in the lower 48 states. Over half of the entire state’s population lives within the municipality of Anchorage. Many Alaskan villages can only be reached ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Mangrove coasts: a muddy story (Part 3)

    In my first blog, I introduced the term “ecosystem services”, which has become a popular way to refer to the value of ecosystems. This is an important concept as it provides a counter-argument to the often narrow-minded and short-eyed approach of ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Green catering tips

    It's that time of the year again - party time. Whether it's St Patrick's Day, Easter, birthdays, Christmas, weddings, Thanksgiving, Halloween or Hanukkah, we all enjoy letting our hair down and having fun with friends and family! And with these events, come the mountains of munch-ables - tasty treats of every shape, colour and ingredient. But how green is our spinach really, and should we be ...


    By green24

  • Water Preservation: What YOU Can Do

    If you’re presently reading this blog, you probably truly appreciate and understand something in which we all have a passionate interest. Water! We rely on water for hydration, irrigation, transportation, energy production, food production, weather patterns and so much more. Lakes, oceans, rivers and reservoirs across the Globe are part of the pillars that sustain life. If you are ...


    By Deep Trekker Inc.

  • Bunyala rice irrigation scheme (Kenya) - a case study of the munaka outgrowers community based organisation

    Background Kenya's irrigation potential stands at 539 OOOha of which only 105 OOOha (19%) has been| developed and annual growth a lowly 0.5% per annum. This situation justifies increased investment in irrigation development to ensure accelerated growth and sustainable development. Among the constraints cited as limiting irrigation development in Kenya are; low prioritization due to wrong ...

  • Top trends conservationists should be paying attention to — but aren’t

    Artificial intelligence, testosterone and ship tracking technology probably aren’t on many conservation organizations’ “top things to think about” lists right now. But they should be, suggests a new report in the scientific journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution. ...


    By Ensia

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • The most threatened ecosystem you’ve never heard of

    What covers up to 600,000 square kilometers (230,000 square miles) of Earth’s surface, provides benefits worth an estimated US$570 billion each year, and is rapidly being lost due to human activity? If you have not a clue, you’re far from alone. Scientists who study the underwater feature known as a seagrass meadow call it a “ ...


    By Ensia

  • Soy entering valuable wetlands of the Paraná Delta, Argentina

    Due to the enormous emphasis on soybean cultivation within Argentina, activities such as cattle raising but also the cultivation of soybeans are increasingly pushed to more marginal and vulnerable areas, where the cost of land is lower. The Paraná Delta, one of the most unique and important wetlands regions in the world, is one of these places. Although the region is not ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Vineyards Make Switch to "Four Course" Compost

    Untitled Document FORGET about the Grapes of Wrath. There's a new story in California: ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Full Planet, Empty Plates: Chapter 2. The Ecology of Population Growth

    Throughout most of human existence, population growth has been so slow as to be imperceptible within a single generation. Reaching a global population of 1 billion in 1804 required the entire time since modern humans appeared on the scene. To add the second billion, it took until 1927, just over a century. Thirty-three years later, in 1960, world population reached 3 billion. Then the pace sped ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Learning from past civilizations

    To understand our current environmental dilemma, it helps to look at earlier civilizations that also got into environmental trouble. Our early twenty-first century civilization is not the first to face the prospect of environmentally induced economic decline. The question is how we will respond. As Jared Diamond points out in his book Collapse, some of the early societies that were in ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Eating Green

    Does eating “green” conjure up images of spinach, or broccoli, or asparagus? While these are, without doubt, green foods, our thoughts are not about what's to be eaten but rather, about how a minor change in eating habits or practices can reduce your personal energy use footprint and contribute to the health of the environment. You don't have to be a vegetarian to make an impact!Growing and ...


    By BSC Sustainability Services

  • Composting Advances in Oregon and Washington

    Over the years, different forces have served as drivers to help grow the composting industry. For example, in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was the perceived landfill crisis that led to state bans on disposal of yard trimmings. Composting also has benefitted from a push to meet recycling goals, which has prompted states and local governments to go beyond yard trimmings and into such ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Focus on Australia & New Zealand: Composting Developments In Australia And New Zealand

     Composting Developments In Australia And New Zealand An Emerging Industry Takes Shape To deal with the waste stream in Australia and New Zealand, all strategies refer to organics recycling as a “fundamental vehicle for reaching future waste reduction targets,” notes Edmund Horan of RMIT University in Melbourne. “Composting provides a mechanism, not only for ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • The number one thing each of us can do to protect biodiversity

    Reducing our consumption of animal products can go a long way toward conserving endangered habitat around the world. Agriculture expansion is the leading driver of natural habitat loss worldwide. However, most of this growth is not to produce vegetables, fruits or grains to be eaten by people. Ecosystems are destroyed overwhelmingly to feed livestock. Livestock production ...


    By Ensia

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