forage conservation Articles

  • Family farms can be competitive by focusing on conservation and stewardship

    While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports a 40 percent decline in U.S. cropland soil erosion rates from 1982 to 2007, recent trends appear to challenge this progress. Record prices for corn and soybeans have diverted acres out of conservation programs and encouraged intensive production on a wide scale. Tree lines are cleared and wet areas drained, turning 120-acre farms into ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • USGS Study Points To Biofuel Crop Related Land-Use Change Reducing Honey Bee Habitat

    On August 29, 2016, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) published a study on the result of land-use changes on North and South Dakota commercial honey bee colonies in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. USGS scientists found that grasslands and other landscape ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • Analyzing Biomass Dynamics and changes in species composition across a California Grassland with the UniSpec-DC

    A research group from Michigan State University (Department of Plant Biology) is using the UniSpec-DC to analyze biomass dynamics and changes in species composition across a California grassland system, as they relate to management techniques including prescribed burning, prescribed grazing, and reseeding of native grasses. They are interested in enhancing the understanding of grassland dynamics ...


    By PP Systems

  • Brassica cover crops for Nitrogen retention in the mid-Atlantic coastal plain

    Received for publication February 5, 2008. Brassica cover crops are new to the mid-Atlantic region, and limited information is available on their N uptake capabilities for effective N conservation. Forage radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Daikon), oilseed radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Adagio), and rape (Brassica napus L. cv. Dwarf Essex) were compared with rye (Secale cereale L. cv. Wheeler), a ...

  • Genetic variation within and among wildrye (Elymus canadensis and E. Virginicus) populations from the Southern Great Plains

    There is interest in Canada wildrye (CWR, Elymus canadensis L.) and Virginia wildrye (VWR, E. virginicus L.) for conservation and forage uses. Our objectives were to identify a set of molecular markers to assess genetic structure within and diversity among populations of CWR and VWR from the Southern Great Plains and to determine if these populations had an associated fungal endophyte. Nine CWR ...

  • Optimizing stocking rate for maximum return to a wheat–cattle enterprise using model simulation and economics

    Managing dual-purpose wheat is complex because of the tradeoff relationship between cattle (Bos taurus) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production. Stocking rate (SR) and planting date are key decision variables of the dual systems. The objective was to develop decision support information that help farmers boost profits by adapting SR and planting date to particular production and market ...

  • Top trends conservationists should be paying attention to — but aren’t

    Artificial intelligence, testosterone and ship tracking technology probably aren’t on many conservation organizations’ “top things to think about” lists right now. But they should be, suggests a new report in the scientific journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution. ...


    By Ensia

  • Trees, bees and UBCs

    Tonnes of aluminium cans and foil recycled in the UK are being turned into new trees to provide food, medicines and income for the people of Burkina Faso in West Africa - one of the poorest countries in the world. This article explains the workings of an innovative collaboration. A30-year-old subsistence farmer and mother of five stands proudly next to a sapling in the stifling heat of an ...


    By Recycling International

  • Can bats reduce nut farmers’ pesticide use?

    Ecologist Katherine Ingram is on a quest to quantify the economic value of insect-eating bats in walnut groves. For the past three years, Katherine Ingram has had a most unusual summer job: catching bats and studying their droppings to see what they eat. A doctoral student in ecology at the University of California, Davis, Ingram is exploring the role bats can play as winged ...


    By Ensia

  • Can drip irrigation keep the Prairie Profitable?

    The use of flood and center pivot irrigation of crops via the waters of the Ogallala Aquifer is as hot a discussion topic as the current drought. To many who mine the aquifer to make a living, trying to keep a profitable way of life sustainable in a time when the broader public is seeking more conservation of resources yet wanting inexpensive, plentiful and safe food is problematic. Perhaps it's ...


    By Netafim USA

  • Does one of the world’s most abundant animals need protection from our appetite?

    As demand grows and habitat disappears, scientists ponder tighter controls on the Antarctic krill harvest. Barely longer than your thumb, weighing under an ounce and nearly translucent, delicate crustaceans known as krill are vital to ocean ecosystems around the world. In the waters that encircle Antarctica, krill are an essential food source for penguins, baleen and blue ...


    By Ensia

  • Towards climate-responsible peatlands management

    Peatlands are lands with a naturally accumulated peat layer at their surface. They are found all over the world and come in many forms, display many different characteristics and are used in many different ways. Even though peatlands extend over a relatively small portion of the earth’s land surface, they hold a large pool of carbon. There is no universal definition of peatlands. For the ...


    By Wetlands International

  • The newest strategy for saving bees is really, really old

    With pollinators in decline around the world, conservationists turn to traditional farmers for answers. In northwestern India, the Himalaya Mountains rise sharply out of pine and cedar forests. The foothills of the Kullu Valley are blanketed with apple trees beginning to bloom. It’s a cool spring morning, and Lihat Ram, a farmer in Nashala village, shows me a ...


    By Ensia

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you