furrow planting Articles

  • A root-zone soil regime of wheat: physiological and growth responses to furrow irrigation in raised bed planting in northern China

    Different irrigation methods in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) result in different water and nutrient use efficiencies and, ultimately, plant growth. A field experiment was conducted during the 2006–2007 and 2007–2008 crop cycles to investigate the effects of furrow irrigated raised bed planting and the effects of flood irrigated conventional planting on growth and productivity in winter wheat. In ...

  • Tie-ridge tillage for high altitude pulse production in northern ethiopia

    Pulses including faba bean (Vicia faba L.), lentil (Lens culinaris Medic.), and field pea (Pisum sativum L.) are important components of the cropping systems of semiarid high-altitude northern Ethiopia. Yield potential is often constrained by severe water deficits during grain fill which might be alleviated by reducing runoff throughout the season using microbasin or tie-ridge tillage. Research ...

  • Peanut cultivar response to damage from tobacco thrips and paraquat

    Virginia market-type peanut cultivars in North Carolina vary in the number of days following emergence required to reach optimum maturity, and concern over cultivar response to interactions of tobacco thrips (Frankliniella fusca Hinds) damage in absence of in-furrow insecticide and injury from paraquat exist with respect to cultivar selection. Experiments were conducted during 2007 and 2008 to ...

  • Effect of AgraGel T-400 on tomato crops, U. of Valparaiso, Chile - Case Study

    Introduction At present, a great part of vegetable production in Chile is dedicated to industrial agronomy and one of the most important products is the tomato crop for industrial processing. Chile has a capacity of 180,000 tons of tomatoes per year, which is equivalent to 12,000 hectares of crop land. Among canned products tomato paste represents 38%. This is an important employment ...

  • How to grow more food with less water

    Scientists and farmers collaborate on a quest for more efficient irrigation This story was co-published with Civil Eats, a daily news source for critical thought about the American food system. From reading the weather to choosing a ...


    By Ensia

  • Redefining ag-wastes as coproducts

    Alan Doering doesn’t have the word “waste” in his vocabulary. As the scientist heading up the Agricultural Utilization Research Institute’s (AURI) coproduct utilization program, Doering sees crop residue, agricultural processing leftovers and biomass as products with value worth exploring. “Every leftover or coproduct has a value,” Doering says. “Our goal is to find the best use with the highest ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Climate Smart Agriculture: Zambia’s Strategy to Reduce Emissions

    The agricultural sector is believed to be the backbone of the Zambian economy thereby alleviating problems associated with poverty and food security. The development of the sector is viewed as one sustainable way of economic growth and ‘Eradicating Extreme Poverty and Hunger’ which is goal number one of the Millennium Development Goals (UN, 2000). The sector contributes to the growth ...


    By TractorExport

  • Can We Prevent A Food Breakdown?

    Food & Water Security: Protecting our Most Precious Resources will be a major issue discussed at GLOBE 2014, taking place in Vancouver Canada march 26-28. This article by Lester R. Brown, reprinted here with the kind permission of the author, puts the issue of water and food security ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Can We Prevent A Food Breakdown?

    By Lester R. Brown As food supplies have tightened, a new geopolitics of food has emerged—a world in which the global competition for land and water is intensifying and each country is fending for itself. We cannot claim that we are unaware of the trends that are undermining our food supply and thus our civilization. We know what we need ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Compost Users Forum: The Applied Thoughts Of A Compost Theorist

    WITHIN a 60-mile radius of my office here in central California, there are 1,000 dairies — each having an average of 2,000 cows. They generate over four million tons of manure annually, so we are pretty much in the manure business whether we want to be or not. Somebody has to manage this material and help the farmers utilize it properly, fulfilling its potential monetary value. That’s what we ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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