grain water activity Articles

  • Postanthesis moderate wetting drying improves both quality and quantity of rice yield

    A major challenge in rice (Oryza sativa L.) production in China is to cope with a declining availability of fresh water without compromising grain yield and grain quality. This study was designed to determine if alternate wetting and moderate soil drying during grain filling could maintain grain yield and grain quality. Two rice cultivars, Zhendao 88 (japonica) and Shanyou 63 (indica), were ...

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Different methods for stabilisation of sand dunes using calcium bentonite

    Sand dunes movement in the Arabian arid area hinder land development, expansion of city limits, and diversely affects rural roads, farms, irrigation, and grazing. Early attempts to curb sand movement used agriculture schemes required continuous supply of water; chemical treatment poses environmental concerns. Studies were conducted for sand dune fixation using agricultural and chemical means, but ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • 40 years’ constant pumping - and still going strong

    The pump installed at Shirley Farm, near Montgomery in Powys, transfers water from a 15 feet deep well, along 20 yards of 1” diameter pipework to a 100 gallon tank located in the top storey of the farmhouse. The water is then delivered for use throughout the 20 acre dairy farm as required. Farmer Austin Griffiths, now retired, replaced the original hand pump with a rotary pump when he first moved ...

  • Sustainable Farm Practices for Rice Farming

    Rice is the third-largest crop production, after sugarcane and maize. The main producers of rice are the nations of China, India, Indonesia, Bangladesh, and Vietnam. Rice is a staple crop. More than half the people in the world, about 3.5 billion people, rely on its production. Not only is rice a key source of food but it is also good source of income for many smallholder farmers. The Challenges ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Composting and local food merge st urban garden

    Growing Power (GP), a nonprofit urban garden and training center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, provides affordable produce to neighborhoods without access to fresh food, and processes a variety of organic wastes through composting and anaerobic digestion. Located on a two-acre lot on Milwaukee's north side, the six greenhouses and several hoop houses include raised beds for herbs and greens, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Arsenic in irrigated paddy soils

    Natural arsenic pollution of drinking water has been reported from over 70 countries world-wide, affecting an estimated 150 million people (Ravenscroft et. al., 2008). About 50 million of these people live in Bangladesh, 30 million in India and 33 million in six other countries of south and south-east Asia. It has recently been recognised that arsenic-contaminated groundwater used for irrigation ...

  • Compost, manure and synthetic fertilizer influences crop yields, soil properties, nitrate leaching and crop nutrient content

    From 1993 to 2001, a maize-vegetable-wheat rotation was compared using either 1) composts, 2) manure, or 3) synthetic fertilizer for nitrogen nutrient input. From 1993 to1998, red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) and crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L.) were used as an annual winter legume cover crop prior to maize production. From 1999 to 2001, hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.) served as the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Bunyala rice irrigation scheme (Kenya) - a case study of the munaka outgrowers community based organisation

    Background Kenya's irrigation potential stands at 539 OOOha of which only 105 OOOha (19%) has been| developed and annual growth a lowly 0.5% per annum. This situation justifies increased investment in irrigation development to ensure accelerated growth and sustainable development. Among the constraints cited as limiting irrigation development in Kenya are; low prioritization due to wrong ...

  • Redefining ag-wastes as coproducts

    Alan Doering doesn’t have the word “waste” in his vocabulary. As the scientist heading up the Agricultural Utilization Research Institute’s (AURI) coproduct utilization program, Doering sees crop residue, agricultural processing leftovers and biomass as products with value worth exploring. “Every leftover or coproduct has a value,” Doering says. “Our goal is to find the best use with the highest ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Corn, a Vital Staple Food in Africa

    Africa contributes the least to global warming than any other continent. However, it suffers greatly from some of the more serious impacts of climate changes. The statistics are shocking: Africa emits roughly 4% of greenhouse gas emissions, while the United States emits 23% of the total global greenhouse gasses. Unfortunately, along with Asia, Africa is the region where crop production is the ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Soy entering valuable wetlands of the Paraná Delta, Argentina

    Due to the enormous emphasis on soybean cultivation within Argentina, activities such as cattle raising but also the cultivation of soybeans are increasingly pushed to more marginal and vulnerable areas, where the cost of land is lower. The Paraná Delta, one of the most unique and important wetlands regions in the world, is one of these places. Although the region is not ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Losing Soil

    In 1938, Walter Lowdermilk, a senior official in the Soil Conservation Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, traveled abroad to look at lands that had been cultivated for thousands of years, seeking to learn how these older civilizations had coped with soil erosion. He found that some had managed their land well, maintaining its fertility over long stretches of history, and were ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Chicago Council lists three-decade changes in greenhouse gases and average temperature

    In 2011, we wrote a column, “Global warming is happening: How should farmers respond?” (http://agpolicy.org/weekcol/549.html). In that column we began by saying, “There was a time when one could legitimately argue that there was a lack of scientific agreement over the issue of the role of humans in global warming and even whether we were in a ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Science’s role in growing diverse, nutritious food

    Can science meet the demand for more diverse and nutritious food? Jan Piotrowski investigates. The riots that swept Africa in 2007 and 2008 in response to the spiralling costs of staple crops brought the effects of food shortages into sharp focus. Images of unrest circled the globe, and the consequent instability brought to the forefront of political debate a question that had ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Biocycle World

    OPTIONS FOR MANAGING COMPOST LEACHATE DURING EXCESSIVE RAINFALL CONDITIONSAn Information Sheet prepared by The Composting Association in the United Kingdom gives an overview of available options for managing “liquor” (leachate) produced at composting sites - especially following the excessively rainy spring/summer of 2007. “Compost leachate” can be described as water that has changed in ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Energy`s `face of the future`

    With his slow smile, trademark black cowboy hat and soft-spoken manner, Evan Chrapko is very much a modern rural Albertan. He's completely at home in the muck and mire of a farm, but equally at ease in a boardroom or at a black-tie-and-champagne reception. Evan and his brother, Shane, part of a family that grew up on an organic farm in eastern Alberta, are also a face of the Green Future. Evan ...


    By Himark bioGas Inc

  • One Year Later · Persistent Herbicides in Compost

    ONE YEAR has passed since the Washington State University (WSU) composting facility and the Spokane Regional Compost Facility discovered traces of persistent herbicides in their composts. In Spokane, the source of contamination is a compound called clopyralid. Compost contamination at WSU initially involved the herbicide picloram, but clopyralid has since been detected in the compost also. In ...


  • The Man Who Discovered the "Divine Materials" in Compost

    Untitled Document BioCycle July 2004, Vol. 45, No. 7, p. 58 Compost life continues bright, vigorous and upstream for Harry Hoitink, as he ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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