group animal scale Articles

  • Latest Developments in Mid-to-Large-Scale Vermicomposting

    Latest Developments in Mid-to-Large-Scale Vermicomposting This overview of systems and operational projects describes factors which contribute to their success as well as the challenges that have forced sites to close. Many different approaches are being used to process large volumes of organic residuals with earthworms, ranging from relatively simple land and labor-intensive ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Release of the 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species reveals ongoing decline of the status of plants and animals

    The number of known threatened species reaches 16,119. The ranks of those facing extinction are joined by familiar species like the polar bear, hippopotamus and desert gazelles; together with ocean sharks, freshwater fish and Mediterranean flowers. Positive action has helped the white-tailed eagle and offers a glimmer of hope to Indian vultures. Geneva, Switzerland, 2 May 2006 (IUCN) – The ...

  • 5 C’s Of Calf Care

    Every producer has individual opportunities and challenges due to their housing environment and management strategy. The key to maximizing growth, health, and long-term profitability is establishing a sound system of care for your pre-ruminant livestock. No matter the system you choose, ensuring these 5 keys to management are acknowledged and defined for you and your team will enhance the ...


    By Grober Nutrition USA

  • Chicken waste could produce unexpected energy windfalls in Ukraine

    Ukrainians soon could enjoy a new windfall of electricity and heat from an unexpected source – chickens. In some unusual news, the Swiss company Alter Energy Group AG is assessing Ukrainian poultry farm sites to implement a sophisticated waste to energy process. The process takes chicken and poultry manure and turns it into clean, environmentally safe, industrial scale electricity and heat. This ...

  • Seeing the forest and the trees, all 3 trillion of them

    A new Yale-led study estimates that there are more than 3 trillion trees on Earth, about seven and a half times more than some previous estimates. But the total number of trees has plummeted by roughly 46% since the start of human civilization, the study estimates. Using a combination of satellite imagery, forest inventories, and supercomputer technologies, the international team of researchers ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • `Good Agricultural Practices’ in the Agri-food Supply Chain

    Keywords: Voluntary private standard schemes, food quality, food safety, ethical production, environmental standards, SPS Agreement, TBT Agreement, market entry barriers, product liability. Abstract: Criteria defining 'good agricultural practice' (GAP) were originally developed for on-farm production methods and resource use. For a decade, GAP principles have been applied ...


  • Cow-pattie power

    On a massive cattle feedlot located outside the town of Vegreville, Alta., the pungent odour of cow manure is masked by the sweet smell of the province’s energy future. Turning cattle dung — “brown gold,” as some call it — into green power and other valuable byproducts is a made-in-Alberta energy solution that is not only sustainable and energy efficient, but also ...


    By Himark bioGas Inc

  • Brazil: Controlled Composting In Developing Countries

    For more than six years, pilot and large-scale composting experiments have been done at the University of Vicosa in Vicosa, Brazil. We focused on low cost technologies, forced aeration techniques, vector and leachate control, process monitoring, staff training, and technical assistance to farms and city councils. It seems that an unwritten law for solid waste management for developing countries ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Overfishing Threatens Critical Link in the Food Chain

    The fish near the bottom of the aquatic food chain are often overlooked, but they are vital to healthy oceans and estuaries. Collectively known as forage fish, these species—including sardines, anchovies, herrings, and shrimp-like crustaceans called krill—feed on plankton and become food themselves for larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Historically, people have eaten ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Saving wetlands through responsible cultivation of soy

    Those consuming tofu and soy milk, but especially meat eaters and those driving a car should keep a critical eye on the impacts of soy cultivation. About 70 percent of soy cultivated is used for animal feed fulfilling the growing meat demands in the world, while the second largest driver of soy expansion is for the use of biodiesel. Whilst recognising these values of soy, its expansion has ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Pragmatic farm composters forge new path to resource recovery

    AG CHOICE is an on-farm composting operation located in the scenic countryside of Andover, New Jersey. On the drive to tour their site, it was astounding just how much of New Jersey, our most densely populated state, is still rural. Jay and Jill Fischer operate the two-year-old facility, which is one of a kind in New Jersey. Jay also owns and operates a sawmill in the area, and it was while ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • The problems with the arguments against GM crops

    New evidence shows that arguments against GM crops are unfounded, says Margaret Karembu. The year 2013 marked the 18th consecutive year of commercial cultivation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) or now commonly referred to as biotech crops. And in just under two decades, the volume of ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Cultivating energy crop production

    A NEW Farm Bill is moving through the Congressional legislative process. Along the way, commercial agriculture is debating the energy impacts of future corn and soybean production. The growth of corn-based ethanol and soybean-based biodiesel has created competition for the feed inputs into animal agriculture, namely corn and soybeans. While most of agriculture discusses energy production from ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • The Man Who Discovered the "Divine Materials" in Compost

    Untitled Document BioCycle July 2004, Vol. 45, No. 7, p. 58 Compost life continues bright, vigorous and upstream for Harry Hoitink, as he ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • How green was my Vertical Farm?

    By 2050, 80% of the earth’s population will live in cities and 3 billion more people will need to be fed. The simple fact is we are running out of available land to grow enough food to feed them. If we can’t grow our cities outward to find more arable land, the only solution is to grow them upwards. This may change the way we design cities forever.The problem is real and immediate. Even by most ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • The complex nature of GMOs calls for a new conversation

    An honest discussion of genetically modified organisms must move beyond narrow concepts of human health to the wider social and environmental impacts of engineered crops. The GMO debate is one from which I’ve kept a purposeful distance. For one thing, it’s an issue that has already garnered more than its fair share of attention. For another, when you consider that many ...


    By Ensia

  • Focus on Australia & New Zealand: Composting Developments In Australia And New Zealand

     Composting Developments In Australia And New Zealand An Emerging Industry Takes Shape To deal with the waste stream in Australia and New Zealand, all strategies refer to organics recycling as a “fundamental vehicle for reaching future waste reduction targets,” notes Edmund Horan of RMIT University in Melbourne. “Composting provides a mechanism, not only for ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Using Compost To Control Plant Diseases

    Losses due to soilborne diseases on some greenhouse, nursery and vegetable crops can amount to thousands of dollars per acre annually. Until the 1930s, organic amendments — consisting of animal and green manures, coupled with crop rotation — were principal methods of control. But these approaches were largely abandoned for reasons of cost and inconvenience after commercial fertilizers and the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composting Advances in Oregon and Washington

    Over the years, different forces have served as drivers to help grow the composting industry. For example, in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was the perceived landfill crisis that led to state bans on disposal of yard trimmings. Composting also has benefitted from a push to meet recycling goals, which has prompted states and local governments to go beyond yard trimmings and into such ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Contained Composting Systems Rewiew

    Having gained success in recycling yard trimmings, composters and recycling coordinators are reaching deeper into the organic residuals pile to capture other feedstocks. In particular, their sights are set on source separated food materials, from institutions (e.g. schools, hospitals), grocery stores and produce markets, food processors and commercial food service facilities (e.g. restaurants). A ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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