harvesting combine Articles

  • Can the World Feed China?

    By Lester R. Brown Overnight, China has become a leading world grain importer, set to buy a staggering 22 million tons in the 2013–14 trade year, according to the latest U.S. Department of Agriculture projections. As recently as 2006—just eight years ago—China had a grain surplus and was exporting 10 million tons. What caused this dramatic shift? It wasn’t until 20 years ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Can medicinal plants alleviate poverty and protect Nepal’s fragile environment?

    Farmers in the high Himalayas partner with a U.S.–based nonprofit to cultivate medicinal plants — and the environmental and economic benefits they offer. On a trip to their childhood home in eastern Nepal in the early 2000s, Nepalese staff members of the Mountain Institute — an organization headquartered in Washington, D.C., that works to protect mountain environments ...


    By Ensia

  • Proactive approach to slug control recommended to potato growers

    If left untreated, slugs can cost the potato industry £53 million each year. With predictions of a high pressure slug season ahead, and the potential damage these pests can do to a crop both physically and financially, Robert Boothman, commercial director of Boothmans Agriculture, explains how to keep one step ahead of the pest. “The milder, wet winter and lack of ground frosts ...


    By Certis UK

  • Local advice on managing blackgrass

    Blackgrass is a weed that troubles many, and controlling it is an increasing challenge, particularly with the small armoury of products available, and the growing issue with resistance. Paul Drinkwater, Crop Production Manager for Abbots Ripton Farming Company, explains how, in his 40 years of being in the Cambridgeshire area, the blackgrass problem has evolved. “My role sees me manage ...


    By Certis UK

  • Heat and Drought Ravage U.S. Crop Prospects—Global Stocks Suffer

    September estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) show 2012 U.S. corn yields at 123 bushels per acre, down by a fourth from the 2009 high of 165 bushels per acre. Yields are the lowest since 1995 and well below the average of the last 30 years. The summer heat and drought also hit U.S. soybean yields, which are down 20 ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Case study - Topsail Beach, NC - 203 North Anderson Blvd.

    Stored rainwater is used to supply drip irrigation while a dry well system carries rooftop stormwater runoff below a parking area in this residential BRAE design. Project: 203 North Anderson Blvd. Location: Topsail Beach, NC Application: Drip Irrigation System and Stormwater Infiltration System(s): BRAE Complete™ Home ...

  • Ethylene Removal by Chemisorption

    Conference presentation at IRAN BIOTECH 2015 (Teheran) Abstract Iran ranks seventh in the world for kiwi production, with over 3200 MT produced in 2012. Kiwifruit can be stored for over 6 months under appropriate conditions, but fruit softening and fruit rots (Botrytis cinerea) can cause severe losses during cold storage, transit, distribution and retail. ...


    By Bioconservacion SA

  • Composting Organics In Canada

    Organic waste diversion is spreading steadily across Canada, with greater tonnages being collected through residential curbside pick ups and depots, as well as from food processors and others in the industrial, commercial and institutional sectors. At the federal level, Canada’s government has a small presence in organics diversion and composting. It offers occasional financial support, as ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • How can we create jobs, reduce food prices and boost economies?

    The fate of heads of state across the globe is tied in large part to their ability to ensure employment, economic growth, and access to cheap food and clean water. Rising food prices have helped topple dictators across the Middle East. Europe, the United States, Japan and other major economies are spending trillions of dollars to restore growth and jobs. Too often, efforts to address ...

  • Can grains of the past help us weather storms of the future?

    Combining science with traditional knowledge, researchers turn to ancient rice as a source of climate resilience In May 2009, Cyclone Aila wreaked havoc in eastern India. Clocking in at speeds of over 120 kilometers per hour, Aila hit the ...


    By Ensia

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • Losing Soil

    In 1938, Walter Lowdermilk, a senior official in the Soil Conservation Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, traveled abroad to look at lands that had been cultivated for thousands of years, seeking to learn how these older civilizations had coped with soil erosion. He found that some had managed their land well, maintaining its fertility over long stretches of history, and were ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Many Countries Reaching Diminishing Returns in Fertilizer Use

    When German chemist Justus von Liebig demonstrated in 1847 that the major nutrients that plants removed from the soil could be applied in mineral form, he set the stage for the development of the fertilizer industry and a huge jump in world food production a century later. Growth in food production during the nineteenth century came primarily from expanding cultivated area. It was not until the ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Development of a Bioaccumulation Model For Herbicides in Ulva and Clams

    Coastal lagoons are shallow water ecosystems characterised by high biodiversity and primary and secondary production, and with an elevated number of different habitats. These habitats have a key role as nursery and rest areas for a great number of marine species and birds. During the last decades these ecosystems have been exposed tomany anthropogenic pressures (urban, domestic, agricultural ...


  • Expanding marine protected areas to restore fisheries

    After World War II, accelerating population growth and steadily rising incomes drove the demand for seafood upward at a record pace. At the same time, advances in fishing technologies, including huge refrigerated processing ships that enabled trawlers to exploit distant oceans, enabled fishers to respond to the growing world demand. In response, the oceanic fish catch climbed from 19 million tons ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Leveling the Playing Field for Legal Timber in Brazil

    Brazil is one of the most biologically diverse countries in the world. What is less known is that the country is the fourth largest industrial ...

  • What`s What and Who`s Who in Compostable Products

    THESE are, without a doubt, exciting times for companies in the compostable products industry - from the manufacturers of resins to the distributors of the end products. After close to 20 years of product and market development, a number of factors are converging to create demand for compostable bags, foodservice ware, packaging films and containers. These include retailer demand for sustainable ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Science’s role in growing diverse, nutritious food

    Can science meet the demand for more diverse and nutritious food? Jan Piotrowski investigates. The riots that swept Africa in 2007 and 2008 in response to the spiralling costs of staple crops brought the effects of food shortages into sharp focus. Images of unrest circled the globe, and the consequent instability brought to the forefront of political debate a question that had ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Compost integral in new website in building soil

    A website called “BuildingSoil” has been launched by the Washington Organic Recycling Council to help builders preserve healthy soil on building sites. It's the latest Soils for Salmon project which aims to change standard site development practices. These new “soil best management practices” will soon be required by local governments around western Washington, as they update local codes to ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Nestlé - Improving product performance along the value chain

    May 6, 2013 By Claus Conzelmann GLOBE-Net, May 6, 2013 - The food production chain uses a large share of the world's limited resources, which is why as the world's ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

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