hay producer Articles

  • Rake In Greater Capacity And Higher Hay Quality

    It’s been said that the steel-toothed dump rake was first introduced in the 1860s. Of course, the process back then was to rake hay into piles, which were then pitched onto a wagon for transport to a haystack or the barn loft. To make windrows for the balers that came later, the operator simply spaced the “dumps” equally so they lined up in the field. The irony is that until ...


    By Vermeer

  • Ergot alkaloid concentrations in tall fescue hay during production and storage

    Common tall fescue [Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh. = Schedonorus arundinaceus (Schreb.) Dumort.] is infected with a fungus that produces ergot alkaloids, a class of compounds associated with fescue toxicosis. The objective of this research was to monitor the change in concentrations of ergot alkaloids from time of clipping through storage of tall fescue hay. A 2-yr field study was ...

  • Intake and digestibility of ‘Coastal’ bermudagrass hay from treated swine waste using subsurface drip irrigation

    Waste handling systems for confined swine production in the upper South (approximately 32–37° N and 79–93° W) depend mainly on anaerobic lagoons and application of the waste effluent to cropland. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of ‘Coastal’ bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] hay receiving effluent generated from a raw swine waste treatment system designed to ...

  • Cattail plants’ Biomass as a bulking agent in sewage Sludge composting and the effect of the produced Compost on cattail plants’ Growth

    In every Greek island there is at least one town with more than 20,000 inhabitants. Several smaller towns and villages range from a few hundreds to a few thousands in population. Usually in the larger towns there are sewage treatment facilities providing at least secondary treatment of wastewater. In most cases the effluent produced is drained to the sea and the sludge is dumped in landfills. In ...


    By ORBIT e.V.

  • Comparison of runoff quantity and quality under annual cropping and forages

    Conversion from annual cropping to perennial forages may be a beneficial management practice (BMP) to reduce runoff quantity and improve surface water quality. Runoff variables were determined in two 30 ha producer's fields over 4 years (2004–2007) using a rainfall simulator. Field 1 was cropped to barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in 2004 and then an alfalfa (Medicago sp.) and grass mix used for ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Economics of five wheat production systems with no-till and conventional tillage

    Conventional tillage (CT) continues to be used on the vast majority of land seeded to monoculture winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Southern Plains of the United States. In the region, wheat can be grown for either grain-only, forage-only, or for both fall–winter forage + grain (dual-purpose). This study was conducted to determine the net returns of five alternative wheat production ...

  • Reuse of dairy lagoon wastewater through SDI in forage crops

    Abstract California has become the leading dairy products producing state in the USA. This has resulted in farms commonly milking several thousand cows per day. The care and feeding of the animals has produced large waste streams commonly collected and stored in lagoons. Environmentally safe handling and reuse of the lagooned wastewater is the objective of this study. A system of ...


    By Geoflow, Inc.

  • An economic analysis of alfalfa harvest methods when infested with verticillium wilt

    Verticillium wilt is a disease that negatively affects alfalfa fields throughout the northern United States. This disease is caused by the fungus Verticillium albo-atrum that, once introduced into alfalfa fields, spreads rapidly, becomes difficult to control, and causes substantial plant yield loss. This disease can be extremely costly for alfalfa hay producers, especially for producers where ...

  • Long-term agronomic performance of organic and conventional field crops in the mid-atlantic region

    Despite increasing interest in organic grain crop production, there is inadequate information regarding the performance of organically-produced grain crops in the United States, especially in Coastal Plain soils of the mid-Atlantic region. We report on corn (Zea mays L.), soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) yields at the USDA-ARS Beltsville Farming Systems Project ...

  • Feed Pellet Mill for Making Rabbit Pellets

    Rabbits are included in a family called Lagomorphs. Due to their unique digestive systems, rabbits require a diet that’s high in fiber, low in protein. The basic nutritional needs of rabbits are carbohydrates, proteins, fats, fiber, vitamins, minerals and water, thus the nucleus of any good rabbit diet consists of pellets, fresh hay, water, and fresh vegetables. Treats, such as fruits or ...


  • Recurrent restricted phenotypic selection for improving stand establishment of Bahiagrass

    Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flügge) is an important perennial forage grass for the southeastern United States, being well adapted to conditions such as sandy or poorly drained soils, drought, and heavy continuous grazing. Current bahiagrass cultivars germinate over an extended period of time and the slow emergence produces incomplete stands, allowing weeds to compete and delaying grazing or ...

  • Composting In rural Alaska

    Gardeners, communities and commercial enterprises have proven that composting works in Alaska, especially given large quantities of fish waste and diminishing landfill capacity. ALASKA is two and a half times larger than the largest state in the lower 48 states. Over half of the entire state’s population lives within the municipality of Anchorage. Many Alaskan villages can only be reached ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Certified Organic Farm Relies on Compost

    Located 50 miles northwest of Dayton, Ohio, the owners of Fresh Aire Farms grow crops on over 250 acres of farmland, relying on high quality compost as a soil conditioner and nutrient amendment. Dan and Michelle Young started composting seven years ago to reduce the amount of chemical inputs they had to buy. “We are a certified organic farm incorporating sound cropping principles,” says Dan ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • One Year Later · Persistent Herbicides in Compost

    ONE YEAR has passed since the Washington State University (WSU) composting facility and the Spokane Regional Compost Facility discovered traces of persistent herbicides in their composts. In Spokane, the source of contamination is a compound called clopyralid. Compost contamination at WSU initially involved the herbicide picloram, but clopyralid has since been detected in the compost also. In ...


  • Falling water tables` knock-on effect on falling harvests

    Scores of countries are overpumping aquifers as they struggle to satisfy their growing water needs. The drilling of millions of irrigation wells has pushed water withdrawals beyond recharge rates, in effect leading to groundwater mining. The failure of governments to limit pumping to the sustainable yield of aquifers means that water tables are now falling in countries that contain more than half ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • The Advantages of Feed Pellets for Horse Farming

    The Advantages of Feed Pellets for Horse Farming The modern horse industry has received great development in the developed countries, which becomes the main economic growth point and provides a large number of employment opportunities. The modern horse owners require the horses healthy and satisfactory in all respects, ...


  • The Ins and Outs of Cattle Nutrition

    They say, “You are what you eat.” What goes in and out of our bodies is obviously important for our general health and maintenance. Well, the same holds true for our cattle as well, but with one main difference: Where we only have one stomach to worry about, they have four! Cattle are animals technically classified as ruminants, a distinction that includes sheep, ...


    By Lakeland Group

  • Aerobic Composting 101

    If you have recently purchased a compost tumbler bin, let me be the first to say congratulations! You’ve just taken the first step toward aerobic composting. What is aerobic composting, you ask, and why is it so great? In this article, we’ll explain how aerobic composting works and what you need to do to get started. There are two main types of composting, aerobic and anaerobic. ...


    By Biofinch Ltd.

  • Research highlights cattle emissions reduction opportunity

    Researchers in Denmark have measured the quantities of greenhouse gases in the breath of dairy cows and demonstrated a heritable variability between individual animals. “This means that we have an opportunity to select for breeding those individuals which will produce offspring that generate less methane,” says Dr Jan Lassen who led the research project on individual methane ...


    By Gasmet Technologies Oy

  • Composting Food Residuals on the Farm

    A county agency and a farmer in Vermont have teamed up to collect and compost food residuals and other organics. The Rutland County Solid Waste District (RCSWD), which is responsible for managing MSW for 16 cities and towns, began planning the food residuals composting program in December, 1996 with the Rutland Natural Resource Conservation District, one of 14 districts in Vermont that promotes ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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