in-field plant pathogen Articles

  • Biopesticides Examined for Role in Field Production

    Biopesticides deserve respect. Once derided as snake oil, today’s products have proven benefits in suppressing pest organisms. Whether they activate plant defenses, parasitize or inhibit pathogen growth or make the environment less favourable to disease, they can play an integral role in crop protection. While the greenhouse sector first excelled at incorporating biopesticides in controlled ...

  • Field trial carried out in the ebro valley, Spain case study

    Rice farmers in Spain experience two major problems with their rice crops: After the flooding and fertilisation of the rice fields algal growth rapidly develops and covers the surface of the water in the paddy. This greatly reduces the availability of sunlight received by the seedlings until they have grown above the water level. This results in early stage plant loss which can be severe. The ...


    By Cleveland Biotech Ltd.

  • Using Compost To Control Plant Diseases

    Losses due to soilborne diseases on some greenhouse, nursery and vegetable crops can amount to thousands of dollars per acre annually. Until the 1930s, organic amendments — consisting of animal and green manures, coupled with crop rotation — were principal methods of control. But these approaches were largely abandoned for reasons of cost and inconvenience after commercial fertilizers and the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Non-chemical Pre-plant Soil Disinfestation

    The battle with pests, diseases and weeds is an everyday problem for every farmer. Due to the fact that 40% of the world’s food production is lost due to pests and diseases, farmers need to manage crop protection. An excellent example of the need for pesticides is cotton. It is a crop that is affected by various pests. Cotton farming accounts for more than 25% of all insecticides and 12% of ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Cattail plants’ Biomass as a bulking agent in sewage Sludge composting and the effect of the produced Compost on cattail plants’ Growth

    In every Greek island there is at least one town with more than 20,000 inhabitants. Several smaller towns and villages range from a few hundreds to a few thousands in population. Usually in the larger towns there are sewage treatment facilities providing at least secondary treatment of wastewater. In most cases the effluent produced is drained to the sea and the sludge is dumped in landfills. In ...


    By ORBIT e.V.

  • Recently planted vegetation strips reduce Giardia runoff reaching waterways

    Current methods for tracking pathogens across farmland and into surrounding waterways via runoff are limited and typically have been developed using artificially created landscapes. No studies have investigated how Giardia in farm runoff moves across the landscape, despite high prevalence rates in dairy cattle (Bos taurus) worldwide. Here, we report the development of a field-based tracking ...

  • What is it about this soil that protects plants from devastating disease?

    Figuring out why certain soils keep plant parasites at bay could be a boon for agriculture around the globe Plants around the world are constantly under attack — often with big implications for humans. In the 1960s, millions of elm trees in Britain, France and the U.S. fell victim to Dutch elm disease, which clogs the vessels that carry life-giving water to the trees’ leaves. ...


    By Ensia

  • Soil microbial, fungal, and nematode responses to soil fumigation and cover crops under potato production

    Abstract  Sodium N-methyldithiocarbamate (metam sodium) and 1,3 dichloropropene are widely used in potato production for the control of soil-borne pathogens, weeds, and plant parasitic nematodes that reduce crop yield and quality. Soil fumigation with metam sodium has been shown in microcosm studies to significantly reduce soil microbial populations and important soil processes such as C ...


  • Playing hide and seek below the soil

    Below the soil of a diverse grassland area you’ll find a jungle of plant roots. It is also home to a wide variety of bacteria and fungi, of which some are pathogenic and looking for a host in the tangle of roots. It appears that this is much more difficult when there is a larger diversity of plants as the host plant is more able to hide among the varied crowd. Greater plant diversity ...

  • Grain legumes in northern great plains

    Cropping systems in the Northern Great Plains have shifted from fallow-based to legume-based systems. The introduction of grain legumes has impacted soil organisms, including both symbiotic and nonsymbiotic N-fixing bacteria, pathogens, mycorrhizae and fauna, and the processes they perform. These changes occur through effects of legume seed exudates, rhizosphere exudates, and decomposing crop ...

  • Evaluating Microbiology of Compost

    The fact that not all compost is created equal has both producers and growers looking for ways to successfully evaluate compost quality. Traditional compost analysis has focused on NPK and micronutrient concentrations in an effort to mirror fertilizer analysis. Compost, however, is much more complex than fertilizer and its most significant value to the grower may be far more than its mineral ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Crop protection 2.0: reducing environmental impact in the EU Is it feasible?

    By 2023 all EU member states must be complying with more stringent guidelines related to Integrated Pest Management (IPM). “The essence of the new guideline is reducing the environmental impact of pesticides,” says Piet Boonekamp, manager of the Bio-interactions and Plant Health business unit at Wageningen UR. “In principle this European goal can be achieved, as has been shown ...

  • Effect of fungicide on soybean growth and yield

    In response to rising input costs and narrowing profit margins, soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] producers are continually looking for ways to increase soybean yield. One approach being promoted is the use of foliar fungicides, for both foliar pathogen control and nonfungicidal plant physiological effects. The objective of this field experiment was to evaluate a strobilurin and a triazole alone ...

  • Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization response to three seed-applied fungicides

    In soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) enhance nutrient and water status and may increase root resistance to soilborne pathogens. However, the fungicides that are routinely applied to the seed may reduce AM colonization, reducing these benefits. Thus, the objective of this research was to assess the effect of three commonly used seed-applied fungicides on AM colonization ...

  • Evaluation of compost for use as a soil amendment in corn and soybean production

    The purpose of this research project was to 1) evaluate rate of compost application and 2) to compare compost with uncomposted raw material and inorganic fertilizer N application upon maize and soybean growth and productivity, and upon soil characteristics. During the first three years of the study, the source of uncomposted material and compost was food waste and ground newsprint. During years 4 ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Cheap chemicals entice caterpillar-eating wasps to crops

    It may be a win-win situation: treating seeds with commercially available growth promoters before planting could have the added benefit of attracting parasitic wasps that feed on caterpillar pests, suggests a study. The protective effect of these cheap, commercially available chemicals, known as ‘plant strengtheners’, can help protect young ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Main Applications of Truck Mounted ULV Fogger

    A fogger is a machine which distributes chemicals such as insecticide or disinfectant into an area by means of a fine spray for killing insects and other arthropods. They are often used by consumers as a low-cost alternative to professional pest control services. The number of fogger needed for pest control depends on the size of the space needed to treat. There are different types of ...

  • Identification of QTL conferring resistance to fusarium head blight resistance in the breeding line c93-3230-24

    Control of Fusarium head blight (FHB), incited primarily by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe [telomorph Gibberella zea (Schwein)], has been a challenge for barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) producers in the upper midwestern United States for more than a decade. This disease manifests primarily in the form of food safety issues and quality discounts due to the presence of deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin ...

  • Golf Course Lakes Treatment

    Atlas Seis is a company with 22 years of experience acting in the fields of Energy and Environment. We have qualified and expert technicians in different fields, equipped with the tools and knowledge necessary to propose the best solutions to our customers. Hereby, we present you the bioaugmentation technology and our biological product bioaqua. The eutrophication process is an enrichment of ...

  • Hyphal growth: a tale of motors, lipids, and the spitzenkorper

    Filamentous fungi are a large and evolutionarily successful group of organisms of enormous ecological importance (27, 114). Fungi also have a considerable impact on our economy because they serve as bio-factories for the industrial production of proteins (90, 130) and because many fungi are human and plant pathogens that pose a threat to public health and agriculture (1, 105, 124). The basic ...

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