insect-killed tree Articles

  • Knowledge of Farm Practices – The Key for Successful Farming

    Agriculture plays an important part in the world economy. One-third of the economically active population obtains its livelihood from agriculture. In Asia and Africa, millions of small-scale farmers, fishermen, and indigenous people produce most of the food consumed worldwide, in most cases on very small plots of land. Agriculture is increasingly called upon to address a wide range of critical ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Interactive effects of pesticide mixtures, predators, and environmental regimes on the toxicity of two pesticides to red‐eyed tree frog larvae

    Global amphibian declines have many corroborative causes and the use of pesticides in agriculture is a likely contributor. In places with high pesticide usage, such as Costa Rica, agrochemical pesticides may interact with other factors to contribute to rapid species losses. Classical ecotoxicological studies rarely address the effects of a pesticide in combinations with other stressors. Here, ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Semios Receives US EPA Approval for 3 New Pheromones To Target the Most Destructive Pests in the Apple & Pear Industry

    Vancouver, BC, November 24, 2014 – Semios, provider of real-time agricultural information and precision pest management tools, has been given US EPA approval for three aerosol pheromone products that disrupt the mating of codling moth and oriental fruit moth. “Our new formula performs extremely well at lower temperatures, emitting a drier mist that disperses quickly across an ...


    By Semios

  • Questions and Answers on Honey Bee Control

    Honey bees are valuable pollinators playing an important role in both native and agricultural crop production. Beekeepers keep bees in wooden manufactured hives, but the most common natural nest site for bees is a hollow tree or other cavity. Occasionally, honey bees may use a wall void or attic space in a house as a nesting site. In these situations, the decision to take action depends upon the ...


    By Master Bee Removal

  • What’s Happening to the Birds?

    Following in Rachel Carson’s footsteps, a new generation of scientists investigates a new generation of pesticides. Christy Morrissey is driving her white pickup truck along Canada’s endless prairie highway, windows open, listening for birds. She points to the scatter of ponds glinting in the landscape, nestled among fields of canola that stretch as far as the eye ...


    By Ensia

  • The Southwest’s most important number

    By mapping a key indicator of droughts, pests and wildfire in arid places, scientists offer hope for spotting — and addressing — drought before it sets in. Junipers are hard to kill. Native to both warm, flooded tropics and the frigidly dry Arctic, it’s no surprise they come highly recommended for beginning landscapers. But in the ...


    By Ensia

  • AnBo Grapple Assists With Forest Conservation

    Grappling with Inefficient Fire Prevention and Forest Management Practices The hydraulic grapple rake, a versatile new loader/tractor/skid steer attachment is speeding forest management tasks with a unique combination of strength, control, and flexibility.From logging and national park conservation to fire prevention, property and habitat protection, too many forest management tasks ...


    By AnBo Manufacturing, Inc

  • Pesticides in the European Union

    There has been a sharply falling trend in the total volume of sales of agricultural pesticides in the EU between 1991 and 1995. But this was reversed in 1996. From 1991-1995, EU sales of pesticides, measured by weight of active ingredients (ai), fell by 13%. They then rose by 6% between 1995 and 1996 to stand at 299,826 tonnes ai. But this still put them nearly 8% below the 1991 figure. The use ...

  • Can bats reduce nut farmers’ pesticide use?

    Ecologist Katherine Ingram is on a quest to quantify the economic value of insect-eating bats in walnut groves. For the past three years, Katherine Ingram has had a most unusual summer job: catching bats and studying their droppings to see what they eat. A doctoral student in ecology at the University of California, Davis, Ingram is exploring the role bats can play as winged ...


    By Ensia

  • Using Compost To Control Plant Diseases

    Losses due to soilborne diseases on some greenhouse, nursery and vegetable crops can amount to thousands of dollars per acre annually. Until the 1930s, organic amendments — consisting of animal and green manures, coupled with crop rotation — were principal methods of control. But these approaches were largely abandoned for reasons of cost and inconvenience after commercial fertilizers and the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • The impact of beetle-induced conifer death on stand-scale canopy snow interception

    Bark beetles have killed more than 100,000 km2 of pine forest in western North America, causing trees to lose the majority of their canopy material and potentially leading to enhanced subcanopy snow accumulation. Over a 45-day period, we tested this hypothesis by measuring daily snow accumulation in three living and two dead lodgepole pine stands and in three adjacent clearings. The largest ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Shrinking forests: The many costs

    In early December 2004, Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo 'ordered the military and police to crack down on illegal logging, after flash floods and landslides, triggered by rampant deforestation, killed nearly 340 people,' according to news reports. Fifteen years earlier, in 1989, the government of Thailand announced a nationwide ban on tree cutting following severe flooding and the ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Earth out of sync rising temperatures throwing off seasonal timing

    A newly hatched chick waits with hungry mouth agape for a parent to deliver its first meal. A crocus peaks up through the snow. Rivers flow swiftly as ice breaks up and snows melt. Sleepy mammals emerge from hibernation, and early frog songs penetrate the night. Spring awakening has long provided fodder for poets, artists, and almanac writers. Even for a notoriously fickle time of sunshine, ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Let the kids go wild outdoors

    A number of international studies have shown that children in developed nations spend an average of 55 hours a week indoors using electronics. Even though this means that the youth in these countries are techno-savvy, it often results in them spending less and less time outdoors. How do we change this, and get our kids to experience the wonders of nature, develop creativity and learn to ...


    By green24

  • Composting Comes Back to The Big Apple

    Untitled Document WE HAD an average of 250 people per day at our compost giveback events and they were ecstatic. My staff working the events ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • CORNucopia of Opportunity in the Heartland: Or Just More Feed for the Political Cattle?

    We now live in a carbon constrained world. Fears of human induced climate change are bringing about changes in government, corporate and consumer behaviors. Investments in renewable energy are increasing, corporations are greening everything from their supply chain to their vehicle fleet, and consumers are seeking to minimize their ecologic footprint as well. Are some of our greening efforts ...


    By AHC Group

  • Climate helps to halve world wildlife in 40 years

    Human pressure has halved the numbers of many of the Earth’s wild creatures in just four decades, the Worldwide Fund for Nature says. While the main recorded threat to biodiversity comes from habitat loss and degradation, driven by unsustainable human consumption, it found, ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Palm oil: not the evil we think it is

    Oil palm is a globally important crop, but our hatred of it stops us from pushing for better ways to develop it. The oil palm, one of around 2,600 species of palm, must be one of the most hated plants on Earth. Ask any self-respecting environmentalist, and his or her face is likely to turn red with anger at the mere mention of its reviled name: Oil Palm. The oil ...


    By Ensia

  • When population growth and resource availability collide

    As land and water become scarce, competition for these vital resources intensifies within societies, particularly between the wealthy and those who are poor and dispossessed. The shrinkage of life-supporting resources per person that comes with population growth is threatening to drop the living standards of millions of people below the survival level, leading to potentially unmanageable social ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • How a Land Use Agency Increases Compost Applications

    Untitled Document A Mecklenburg County office in Charlotte, North Carolina reaches out in many ways to get more residents active in composting and compost use. HERE at the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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