less crop stress Articles

  • How to grow more food with less water

    Scientists and farmers collaborate on a quest for more efficient irrigation This story was co-published with Civil Eats, a daily news source for critical thought about the American food system. From reading the weather to choosing a ...


    By Ensia

  • Enhanced tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in transgenic Alfalfa accumulating trehalose

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is an important forage crop in many countries with high biomass production and the third-most-cultivated crop in the United States, with high protein content and potential use as biofuel. Here we describe the use of a chimeric translational fusion of yeast trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (EC 2.4.1.15) and trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.12) genes to ...

  • Can genetic engineering help quench crops’ thirst?

    Researchers around the world are exploring how GMO technology might boost food production under hot, dry conditions. Roger Deal is trying to figure out how plants remember drought. An assistant professor of biochemistry and genetics at Emory University, Deal says most plants have a kind of memory for stress. When experiencing water shortage, for example, plants close ...


    By Ensia

  • Stevens Water and US Farm Bill Helps Farmers Optimize Crop Irrigation & Fertilization

    Agriculture is a major element for survival of the human race and of the economic system. 42 percent of the world’s laborers are employed in agriculture, making it by far the most common occupation. With agriculture using approximately 60 percent of available fresh water withdrawals, concerns continue to grow over farmers implementing water conservation practices. Also, increasing contamination ...

  • Validating the FAO aquaCrop model for irrigated and water deficient field maize

    Accurate crop development models are important tools in evaluating the effects of water deficits on crop yield or productivity. The FAO AquaCrop model predicts crop productivity, water requirement, and water use efficiency (WUE) under water-limiting conditions. A set of conservative parameters [calibrated and validated for maize (Zea mays L.) in a prior study and considered applicable to a wide ...

  • Agronomic performance of different pea cultivars under various sowing periods and contrasting soil structures

    Yield variability of spring pea (Pisum sativum L.) in farmers' fields is mainly due to soil compaction at sowing and abiotic stresses during the reproductive period. Winter peas flower earlier, and thus should be less sensitive to abiotic stress at the end of the cycle, but because of their sensitivity to frost they must be sown late in autumn when soils are very wet. Pea breeders are working on ...

  • Maize growth and yield under daytime and nighttime solid-set sprinkler irrigation

    Nighttime sprinkler irrigation usually results in lower wind drift and evaporation losses (WDELs) and better irrigation uniformity compared with daytime irrigation. However, daytime sprinkler irrigation modifies the microclimatic conditions within the crop canopy which could result in improved crop growth. We studied the effect of daytime and nighttime irrigation on the growth and yield of maize ...

  • Yield and water use response of cuphea to irrigation in the Northern Corn belt

    Cuphea (Cuphea viscosissima Jacq. x C. lanceolata W.T. Aiton) may be prone to drought stress, yet little is known about the yield response of this new oilseed crop to irrigation. A field study was conducted in western Minnesota on a Barnes loam soil (fine-loamy, mixed, superactive, frigid Calcic Hapludolls) in 2002 and 2003 to compare yield and water use of irrigated and nonirrigated cuphea. ...

  • Grain sorghum and corn comparisons: yield, economic, and environmental responses

    Grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is often grown where water stress is expected. But, improved drought tolerance in corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids has resulted in increased dryland corn production in preference to grain sorghum. However, grain sorghum may still have a yield advantage over corn in drought prone environments. This study was conducted to determine if grain sorghum has either a ...

  • AminoA+ Update and Autumn Recommendations 2016

    AminoA+ Update With harvest 2016 coming to a close and also the first year of our commercial sales of AminoA+ we thought we should review the results and also make some recommendations based on this years’ experience. ...


    By AminoA Ltd

  • New approaches are needed for another Green Revolution

    Twenty-first century agriculture needs low-input advances like the System of Rice Intensification, says Norman Uphoff. According to the principle of diminishing returns, continuing to produce something in the same way, with the same inputs and technology, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Biopesticides Examined for Role in Field Production

    Biopesticides deserve respect. Once derided as snake oil, today’s products have proven benefits in suppressing pest organisms. Whether they activate plant defenses, parasitize or inhibit pathogen growth or make the environment less favourable to disease, they can play an integral role in crop protection. While the greenhouse sector first excelled at incorporating biopesticides in controlled ...

  • Climate Smart Agriculture: Zambia’s Strategy to Reduce Emissions

    The agricultural sector is believed to be the backbone of the Zambian economy thereby alleviating problems associated with poverty and food security. The development of the sector is viewed as one sustainable way of economic growth and ‘Eradicating Extreme Poverty and Hunger’ which is goal number one of the Millennium Development Goals (UN, 2000). The sector contributes to the growth ...


    By TractorExport

  • Science’s role in growing diverse, nutritious food

    Can science meet the demand for more diverse and nutritious food? Jan Piotrowski investigates. The riots that swept Africa in 2007 and 2008 in response to the spiralling costs of staple crops brought the effects of food shortages into sharp focus. Images of unrest circled the globe, and the consequent instability brought to the forefront of political debate a question that had ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Compost Users Forum: The Applied Thoughts Of A Compost Theorist

    WITHIN a 60-mile radius of my office here in central California, there are 1,000 dairies — each having an average of 2,000 cows. They generate over four million tons of manure annually, so we are pretty much in the manure business whether we want to be or not. Somebody has to manage this material and help the farmers utilize it properly, fulfilling its potential monetary value. That’s what we ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composters Build Strong Links to California Farms

    The rapidly increasing amounts of compost applied to California farms can be traced to numerous factors — better crops, fewer disease problems, greater emphasis on product quality, mandated state recycling goals, savings in disposal costs and savings in chemical inputs. And then there’s the factor of friendship, longtime personal relationships that build trust between composters and farm ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Controlling Barnyardgrass with Corn Hybrid Selection

    Barnyardgrass is a summer annual grass weed with a global impact on corn production.  Yield losses due to barnyardgrass competition have been estimated up to 45% or more for crops such as cotton and corn. Besides corn, it can also be a serious weed pest in rice, soybean, sugarbeet, cotton, and corn. Integrated weed management techniques can be used for control of barnyardgrass in corn. High ...

  • Salmon aquaculture could incorporate seaweed and sea urchins to reduce nitrogen enrichment

    Farming fish together with seaweed and other species could help improve the sustainability of aquaculture and reduce pollution. A new study provides a tool for designing sustainable fish farming systems and calculates their potential to recycle waste. An example of a salmon farming system incorporating seaweed and sea urchins could reduce nitrogen releases to the environment by 45%. Over half of ...

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Using Compost To Control Plant Diseases

    Losses due to soilborne diseases on some greenhouse, nursery and vegetable crops can amount to thousands of dollars per acre annually. Until the 1930s, organic amendments — consisting of animal and green manures, coupled with crop rotation — were principal methods of control. But these approaches were largely abandoned for reasons of cost and inconvenience after commercial fertilizers and the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you