live stock waterer Articles

  • Animal behavior and soil nutrient redistribution in continuously stocked pensacola bahiagrass pastures managed at different intensities

    Animal excreta return to pastures plays a major role in nutrient cycling. Improvement in excreta distribution may increase nutrient recovery by pasture plants. Pasture management may modify animal behavior and excreta distribution. This study evaluated the effects of management intensity on animal behavior and soil nutrient concentration in continuously stocked ‘Pensacola’ bahiagrass (Paspalum ...

  • Water Preservation: What YOU Can Do

    If you’re presently reading this blog, you probably truly appreciate and understand something in which we all have a passionate interest. Water! We rely on water for hydration, irrigation, transportation, energy production, food production, weather patterns and so much more. Lakes, oceans, rivers and reservoirs across the Globe are part of the pillars that sustain life. If you are ...


    By Deep Trekker Inc.

  • Investigating the effect of storage temperature and hot–water treatment on the microbial dynamics in edible oyster (Saccostrea cucullata)

    Oysters are an important sea food all over the world apart from shrimp and crabs. They are usually sold as a live product and can be stored for several weeks before consumption. Temperature abuse during oyster post–harvest handling may allow multiplication of natural spoilage microflora as well as pathogens, which is a potential threat to consumers and/or compromising product quality. In this ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • New Era of Food Scarcity Echoes Collapsed Civilizations

    The world is in transition from an era of food abundance to one of scarcity. Over the last decade, world grain reserves have fallen by one third. World food prices have more than doubled, triggering a worldwide land rush and ushering in a new geopolitics of food. Food is the new oil. Land is the new gold. This new era is one of rising food prices and spreading hunger. On the demand side of the ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Modern strains put Lake Victoria in critical condition

    Pollution and overfishing in Lake Victoria have become so severe that scientists believe they threaten the health and livelihoods of millions of East Africans.   And researchers in the three countries bordering the ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • We only have one Earth, so we better start taking care of it.

    Clocks are ticking, and the only planet we have to live on is changing right before our eyes. What are we going to do about it? We are all connected. Farmer or finance minister, president or plumber, we share the same home — this single, living planet. It’s the only home we have. And from my perspective it’s in dire need of attention. ...


    By Ensia

  • The Role of Mangroves in Fisheries Enhancement

    In 2011 humans caught and consumed 78.9 million tonnes of fish, crustaceans, molluscs and other species groups from the world’s oceans, accounting for 16.6% of the world’s animal protein intake (FAO 2012). This is projected to increase further, to over 93 million tonnes by 2030 (World Bank 2013). Global demand for fish products has increased dramatically over recent decades. Fishing ...


    By Wetlands International

  • A hotter planet means less on our plates

    In the Sunday November 22, 2009 issue of Outlook in the Washington Post, Lester Brown discusses the significant implications of food security in the upcoming Copenhagen Conference. As the U.N. climate-change conference in Copenhagen approaches, we are in a race between political tipping points and natural ones. Can we cut carbon emissions fast enough to keep the melting of the Greenland ice ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Green catering tips

    It's that time of the year again - party time. Whether it's St Patrick's Day, Easter, birthdays, Christmas, weddings, Thanksgiving, Halloween or Hanukkah, we all enjoy letting our hair down and having fun with friends and family! And with these events, come the mountains of munch-ables - tasty treats of every shape, colour and ingredient. But how green is our spinach really, and should we be ...


    By green24

  • A Decade After Asian Tsunami, New Forests Protect the Coast

    The tsunami that struck Indonesia in 2004 obliterated vast areas of Aceh province. But villagers there are using an innovative microcredit scheme to restore mangrove forests and other coastal ecosystems that will serve as a natural barrier against future killer waves and storms. On the day that the Indian Ocean tsunami hit his village a decade ago, fisherman Hajamuddin was at sea. It was ...


    By Wetlands International

  • A sustainable solution for massive coastal erosion in Central Java - Towards Regional Scale Application of Hybrid Engineering

    Deltaic populations in western Indonesia are increasingly threatened by rapid shoreline degradation and erosion. In just a few decades, some coastal areas have retreated by more than two kilometres1. Housing, roads and valuable land is literally swept into the sea. This loss of land continues unabated, sometimes by tens of metres per year. The erosion causes saline intrusion, affecting drinking ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Let’s stop treating our soil like dirt

    One of the most underappreciated resources on our planet, soil does much more than grow crops The United Nations’ International Year of Soils is hardly a media darling. Maybe it’s because many people are like me, who recall Mom’s words: “Take off your shoes! Don’t bring dirt ...


    By Ensia

  • Changing climate changes soils

    Varied predictions for soil organic matter as climate changes The hottest months. The snowiest winters. Catastrophic floods and droughts. Climate change impacts lives across the world in drastic and unpredictable ways. This unpredictability also extends to the more subtle – yet still important – effects of climate change. For example, it is ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Soy entering valuable wetlands of the Paraná Delta, Argentina

    Due to the enormous emphasis on soybean cultivation within Argentina, activities such as cattle raising but also the cultivation of soybeans are increasingly pushed to more marginal and vulnerable areas, where the cost of land is lower. The Paraná Delta, one of the most unique and important wetlands regions in the world, is one of these places. Although the region is not ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Less Than 3 Percent of Oceans in Marine Parks Despite Recent Growth

    In May 1975, rising concerns about overfishing and deteriorating ocean health prompted scientists and officials from 33 countries to meet in Tokyo for the first global conference on marine parks and reserves. Noting the need for swift action to safeguard more of the sea, the delegates were unanimous in calling for the creation of a global system of marine protected areas (MPAs)—zones ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • California Vineyard Finds Large Role for Compost

    Untitled Document I CAME to Robert Sinskey Vineyards (RSV) with experience in both small and large-scale wine-grape farming, all of it in ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • From electronic noses to invasive bees, 15 surprising trends for 2017

    What should we be thinking about when we think about the future of biodiversity, conservation and the environment? An international team of experts in horizon scanning, science communication and conservation recently asked that question as participants in the eighth annual Horizon Scan of Emerging Issues for ...


    By Ensia

  • Q&A: Achim Steiner on science in the post-2015 goals

    As executive director of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Achim Steiner has been at the forefront of international conferences on environment and sustainable development, including the Rio+20 conference in June 2012. SciDev.Net caught up with him at the Delhi Sustainable Development Summit (DSDS) in February to discuss the role of science in the post-2015 agenda, and meeting ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Global Forest watch - join the movement

    We know remarkably little about what is happening to forests. Businesses currently have no way of determining whether or how much the soy, palm oil, or pulp and paper they use contribute to deforestation. So companies like Unilever and Nestlé, which ...

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