livestock feed growing Articles

  • Antibiotics and the Livestock Industry

    The Earth’s population has more than quadrupled in the last 150 years, which has led to dramatic changes in the livestock industry because farmers had to increase the density of animals in order to meet demand. As a result of the increased proximity of animals to one another, disease became a huge problem. Subsequently, antibiotics began being commonly used on livestock farms. Originally, ...


    By NW Solutions

  • Organic livestock: why you should embrace it

    The term “organic” is widely used nowadays, usually to refer to products and practices related to a healthier and more conscious lifestyle. But what about organic livestock? Learn more about the practice, its benefits and why you should start embracing it as your main production system. What is organic livestock? Organic livestock is a practice that consists on ...


    By GR Trailers LLC

  • Can the World Feed China?

    By Lester R. Brown Overnight, China has become a leading world grain importer, set to buy a staggering 22 million tons in the 2013–14 trade year, according to the latest U.S. Department of Agriculture projections. As recently as 2006—just eight years ago—China had a grain surplus and was exporting 10 million tons. What caused this dramatic shift? It wasn’t until 20 years ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Growing demand for soybeans threatens Amazon rainforest

    Some 3,000 years ago, farmers in eastern China domesticated the soybean. In 1765, the first soybeans were planted in North America. Today the soybean occupies more U.S. cropland than wheat. And in Brazil, where it spread even more rapidly, the soybean is invading the Amazon rainforest. For close to two centuries after its introduction into the United States the soybean languished as a curiosity ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Science’s role in growing diverse, nutritious food

    Can science meet the demand for more diverse and nutritious food? Jan Piotrowski investigates. The riots that swept Africa in 2007 and 2008 in response to the spiralling costs of staple crops brought the effects of food shortages into sharp focus. Images of unrest circled the globe, and the consequent instability brought to the forefront of political debate a question that had ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Conditioning: Influencing Factor of Feed Pellet Quality

    Conditioning: Influencing Factor of Feed Pellet Quality         In recent years, with the rocketing development of feed industry, feed pellet has been used widely in livestock and fisheries, and the need of ...


  • Growing cool-season crops could save California water

    Farmers base their decisions on which crops to grow based on a number of factors, including yield, water availability, and return on investment. In California, farmers most often decide to plant crops that thrive between March and October. Cool-season crops — those grown between October and June — may ultimately use less irrigation water according to new research from the University ...


    By Fluence Corporation

  • Assessment of the mycoflora of commercial poultry feeds sold in the humid tropical environment of Imo State, Nigeria

    Abstract: This study was carried out to identify the common moulds growing in selected commercial poultry feed sold in Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria. Forty-eight bulk samples derived from192 bags of feeds were collected from broiler starter (BS), broiler finishers (BF), grower mash (GM) and layer mash (LM) across 4 different brands of commercial poultry feeds, which included Livestock (LF), Top (TF) ...

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • The number one thing each of us can do to protect biodiversity

    Reducing our consumption of animal products can go a long way toward conserving endangered habitat around the world. Agriculture expansion is the leading driver of natural habitat loss worldwide. However, most of this growth is not to produce vegetables, fruits or grains to be eaten by people. Ecosystems are destroyed overwhelmingly to feed livestock. Livestock production ...


    By Ensia

  • Conserving and enhancing maize genetic resources as global public goods–a perspective from CIMMYT

    The growing demands for food, feed, and bioenergy worldwide will require a 2% per annum increase in global maize (Zea mays L.) production. Maize is one of the most important staple food crops across the developing world as well as being an important feed crop for global livestock production and the emerging biofuel industry. Maize genotypes can range from 0.5 to 5 m standing height at flowering, ...

  • Family farms can be competitive by focusing on conservation and stewardship

    While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports a 40 percent decline in U.S. cropland soil erosion rates from 1982 to 2007, recent trends appear to challenge this progress. Record prices for corn and soybeans have diverted acres out of conservation programs and encouraged intensive production on a wide scale. Tree lines are cleared and wet areas drained, turning 120-acre farms into ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • The localization of agriculture

    In the United States, there has been a surge of interest in eating fresh local foods, corresponding with mounting concerns about the climate effects of consuming food from distant places and about the obesity and other health problems associated with junk food diets. This is reflected in the rise in urban gardening, school gardening, and farmers’ markets. With the fast-growing local foods ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • EMSL expands often overlooked mycotoxin testing services due to demand

    Are there Mycotoxins in your air or food? Mycotoxins can be produced by fungi growing on crops during field or storage conditions and on damp building materials. Emerging research indicates that exposure to mycotoxins may lead to a variety of health effects. Some of the more common exposures can be traced to ingestion of contaminated foods and feed. Examples of contaminated food ingredients ...


  • Dietary changes could help India save water, reduce greenhouse gases

    Residents of India should be changing their diets to help conserve water and decrease greenhouse gas emissions, according to a recent study. This is the first study of the ramifications of people changing their food habits to conserve water. The nation’s population is expected to rise to 1.6 billion by 2050. This increase in population (and increase in food demand) is projected to reduce ...


    By Fluence Corporation

  • Main Applications of Truck Mounted ULV Fogger

    A fogger is a machine which distributes chemicals such as insecticide or disinfectant into an area by means of a fine spray for killing insects and other arthropods. They are often used by consumers as a low-cost alternative to professional pest control services. The number of fogger needed for pest control depends on the size of the space needed to treat. There are different types of ...

  • Rising Meat Consumption Takes Big Bite out of Grain Harvest

    http://www.earth-policy.org/data_highlights/2011/highlights22 World consumption of animal protein is everywhere on the rise. Meat consumption increased from 44 million tons in 1950 to 284 million tons in 2009, more than doubling annual consumption per person to over 90 pounds. The rise in consumption of milk and eggs is equally dramatic. Wherever incomes rise, so does meat consumption. ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Energy`s `face of the future`

    With his slow smile, trademark black cowboy hat and soft-spoken manner, Evan Chrapko is very much a modern rural Albertan. He's completely at home in the muck and mire of a farm, but equally at ease in a boardroom or at a black-tie-and-champagne reception. Evan and his brother, Shane, part of a family that grew up on an organic farm in eastern Alberta, are also a face of the Green Future. Evan ...


    By Himark bioGas Inc

  • Bumper 2011 Grain Harvest Fails to Rebuild Global Stocks

    The world’s farmers produced more grain in 2011 than ever before. Estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture show the global grain harvest coming in at 2,295 million tons, up 53 million tons from the previous record in 2009. Consumption grew by 90 million tons over the same period to 2,280 million tons. Yet with global grain production actually falling short of consumption in 7 ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Redefining ag-wastes as coproducts

    Alan Doering doesn’t have the word “waste” in his vocabulary. As the scientist heading up the Agricultural Utilization Research Institute’s (AURI) coproduct utilization program, Doering sees crop residue, agricultural processing leftovers and biomass as products with value worth exploring. “Every leftover or coproduct has a value,” Doering says. “Our goal is to find the best use with the highest ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you