livestock research service Articles

  • Searching for the best dog to save livestock — and wildlife

    Can the right breed help keep both domestic animals and native carnivores alive? This story was co-published with High Country News, a nonprofit media organization that covers the important issues and stories that define the American West. On a bright fall morning in central Washington, a flock of ...


    By Ensia

  • Implementing Research : Georgia Takes Many Routes to Recycle Food Residuals

     PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines and tanks — which go back to 1941 — ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Users Forum : Compost Research On Wisconsin Organic Farm

     Cocomposting at Pearl Harbor PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Preconsumer Collection : Composting Food Service Scraps at Resort

     Cocomposting at Pearl Harbor PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • EMSL expands often overlooked mycotoxin testing services due to demand

    Are there Mycotoxins in your air or food? Mycotoxins can be produced by fungi growing on crops during field or storage conditions and on damp building materials. Emerging research indicates that exposure to mycotoxins may lead to a variety of health effects. Some of the more common exposures can be traced to ingestion of contaminated foods and feed. Examples of contaminated food ingredients ...


  • Assessing agroforestry`s advantages

    Agroforestry, the deliberate placement of trees into crop and livestock operations, can help capture substantial amounts of carbon on agricultural lands while providing production and conservation benefits. However, we currently lack tools for accurately estimating current and projected carbon values in these systems. In North America, windbreaks are an effective carbon-capturing option. Only ...

  • The number one thing each of us can do to protect biodiversity

    Reducing our consumption of animal products can go a long way toward conserving endangered habitat around the world. Agriculture expansion is the leading driver of natural habitat loss worldwide. However, most of this growth is not to produce vegetables, fruits or grains to be eaten by people. Ecosystems are destroyed overwhelmingly to feed livestock. Livestock production ...


    By Ensia

  • Inside stories on climate compatible development: Zambia

    Production of staple crops, such as maize, is under increasing risk in Africa because of climate change and depleting soil fertility. The potential consequences for food security are dire. Climate change and food security must be tackled together. Modern methods of agroforestry and “conservation agriculture with trees” are employing age-old indigenous practices of natural ...

  • Family farms can be competitive by focusing on conservation and stewardship

    While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports a 40 percent decline in U.S. cropland soil erosion rates from 1982 to 2007, recent trends appear to challenge this progress. Record prices for corn and soybeans have diverted acres out of conservation programs and encouraged intensive production on a wide scale. Tree lines are cleared and wet areas drained, turning 120-acre farms into ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Cover-all building ideal for composting process

    Hy-Line International is a multi-million dollar company whose primary purpose is the sole production, multiplication and distribution of leghorn genetics.  At its Iowa facility in Dallas Center, Hy-Line chose to handle its hatchery by-product in a cost effective manner by combining it with field by-products, such as corn stocks and chicken manure, to create a compost product for ...


  • Tech-based farming advice should stay people-centred

    Video advice can help farmers — if it's local and backed by strong partnerships, says Digital Green's Rikin Gandhi. Gauravva Channappa Morabad is a hardworking woman living in Kamplikoppa village, in the Dharwad district of India's Karnataka state. She is part of a women's self-help group called Shri Kariyamma Devi. Morabad attended all 50 meetings the group held to screen ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Paying a premium for climate resilience

    What is the best way to protect vulnerable rural communities from the damaging impacts of climate change? Insurance could be an answer, but it raises a number of difficult questions. To illustrate, the New York Times recently ran a story, “Report Says a Crop Subsidy Cap ...

  • Soy entering valuable wetlands of the Paraná Delta, Argentina

    Due to the enormous emphasis on soybean cultivation within Argentina, activities such as cattle raising but also the cultivation of soybeans are increasingly pushed to more marginal and vulnerable areas, where the cost of land is lower. The Paraná Delta, one of the most unique and important wetlands regions in the world, is one of these places. Although the region is not ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Why BioLargo Is Hot and Why Shares May Get Hotter

    Investors have waited patiently as BioLargo, Inc. (OTCQB: BLGO) spent millions of dollars and many years developing a world-class water treatment technology that promises to impact the world for good. In much of the world, water equates to life, and the need for clean water has never been so critical as now. Supply challenges are exacerbated by drought, pollution from industry and agriculture, ...


    By Biolargo, Inc.

  • Biocycle World

    OPTIONS FOR MANAGING COMPOST LEACHATE DURING EXCESSIVE RAINFALL CONDITIONSAn Information Sheet prepared by The Composting Association in the United Kingdom gives an overview of available options for managing “liquor” (leachate) produced at composting sites - especially following the excessively rainy spring/summer of 2007. “Compost leachate” can be described as water that has changed in ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Latest Progress in Anaerobic Digestion

    Compared to countries like Germany and Denmark, the United States and Canada have a long way to go in creating the fundamental policy incentives and regulatory mandates that will encourage market development for anaerobic digestion (AD). Someone recently asked me how many years it would take to deploy AD systems on farms in North America that are large enough to economically use them. Given ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • One Year Later · Persistent Herbicides in Compost

    ONE YEAR has passed since the Washington State University (WSU) composting facility and the Spokane Regional Compost Facility discovered traces of persistent herbicides in their composts. In Spokane, the source of contamination is a compound called clopyralid. Compost contamination at WSU initially involved the herbicide picloram, but clopyralid has since been detected in the compost also. In ...


  • How innovation is flourishing at the grassroots

    SciDev.Net reporters across the developing world describe exciting initiatives aimed at supporting innovation in local communities and remote areas. From small-scale hydro-powered electricity in Malaysia to cost-saving solar pumps in Pakistan, communities across the developing world are ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Full Planet, Empty Plates: Chapter 2. The Ecology of Population Growth

    Throughout most of human existence, population growth has been so slow as to be imperceptible within a single generation. Reaching a global population of 1 billion in 1804 required the entire time since modern humans appeared on the scene. To add the second billion, it took until 1927, just over a century. Thirty-three years later, in 1960, world population reached 3 billion. Then the pace sped ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Composting Hits Home Runs Across Canada

    Untitled Document ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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