marine aquaculture industry Articles

  • Future Brief: Sustainable Aquaculture

    Is sustainable aquaculture possible? Aquaculture is facing a new era of expansion in Europe. What are the environmental implications of this, and how can the sector expand sustainably? This Future Brief from Science for Environment Policy presents an overview of research into aquaculture’s impacts, and considers how it could develop in harmony with environmental goals. The ...


    By European Commission

  • Open sea-based Aquaculture case study

    Salmon farming is a multi-billion dollar global industry facing considerable difficulties posed by growing pressure from environmental regulatory bodies. Because marine organisms grow on and “foul” synthetic nets, oxygen available to fish is reduced and infectious diseases and parasites can spread among the fish. A test to study the reduction of fouling formation on netting of fish ...


    By LG Sonic

  • Development of Indonesian Fish Farming & Aquaculture Production

    Part 1.Fish Farms Market Overview in Indonesia Part 2.Reasons Why Fishery Industry Develops Fast in Indonesia Part 3.Fish Farm Types in Indonesian Part 4.Sustainable Development of the Fishery in Indonesia Fish Farms Market Overview in Indonesia Fish farming is the ...

  • Case study - Bomar Pescados, Brazil

    Bomar Pescados was founded at the beginning of this millennium, when many Brazilian entrepreneurs started to recognize aquaculture as a promising business opportunity. From the very beginning, the company focused on producing high quality products with a minimal environmental impact. Because the company runs every aspect itself – from hatchery to harvest and processing of the shrimp ...


    By Inve Aquaculture

  • Seasteading could be the answer to sustainably feeding 9 billion people

    Self-sufficient nation states in the middle of the ocean might be our ticket to a sustainable future. Oceans cover 71 percent of Earth’s surface, yet provide less than 2 percent of the food we eat. The growing demand for seafood, however — predicted to rise to 8 percent during the next decade — from an already depleted and exhausted ocean is forcing ...


    By Ensia

  • Overfishing Threatens Critical Link in the Food Chain

    The fish near the bottom of the aquatic food chain are often overlooked, but they are vital to healthy oceans and estuaries. Collectively known as forage fish, these species—including sardines, anchovies, herrings, and shrimp-like crustaceans called krill—feed on plankton and become food themselves for larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Historically, people have eaten ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Does one of the world’s most abundant animals need protection from our appetite?

    As demand grows and habitat disappears, scientists ponder tighter controls on the Antarctic krill harvest. Barely longer than your thumb, weighing under an ounce and nearly translucent, delicate crustaceans known as krill are vital to ocean ecosystems around the world. In the waters that encircle Antarctica, krill are an essential food source for penguins, baleen and blue ...


    By Ensia

  • Analysis of Selected Herbicides And Related Metabolites in a Coastal Lagoon Under The Influence of Water Runoff: Water Column

    Anthropogenic release of chemical contaminants, in particular pesticides coming from agricultural areas, significantly impacts European aquatic ecosystems. Pesticides and herbicides used in common agricultural practices, are applied only during specific periods of the year, leading to significant seasonal peak concentrations in fresh and coastal waters, particularly in spring after heavy rainfall ...


  • Modern strains put Lake Victoria in critical condition

    Pollution and overfishing in Lake Victoria have become so severe that scientists believe they threaten the health and livelihoods of millions of East Africans.   And researchers in the three countries bordering the ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

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