organic growing media Articles

  • Social media and sustainability: seven key lessons

    At a panel on social media and Corporate Social Responsibility held at the recent GLOBE conference in Vancouver, BC, social media was confirmed as an essential tool to leverage discussions on sustainability into broader audiences. Here are seven recommendations expert panelists from Microsoft, Treehugger (the world's largest green blog), and Dialog, one of Canada's largest architectural firms, ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Compost maturity as expressed by phytotoxicity and Volatile organic acids

    VOA in Composts Maturity is a qualitative trait of compost that may be expressed in a number of ways and is generally held to be relevant to plant performance. Volatile organic acids (VOA) have been cited to be responsible for phytotoxicity (plant growth suppression) when immature compost is used for growing plants (Manios et al., 1989). However, the production of VOA in compost has not been well ...


    By ORBIT e.V.

  • Composting of biodegradable organic wastes for sustainable agriculture

    Investigators: M.A. Ali Khan, Manoj Kumar, Kavita Kashyap, Ruby Rani, Sanjay Yada, Priti Kaushik Siraohi Environmental Science Lab. Dept. of Botany, Simbhaoli, Ghaziabad, India Objectives: To recycle, reduce and reuse hazardous distillery spent wash (DSW). Pressmud cake (PMC) fly ash, Eicchornia/Azolla/trash/litter and DSW inoculated with Trichoderma viride were observed for temperature based ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Extractability, plant yield and toxicity thresholds for boron in compost

    Boron (B) is a trace element essential to crop growth in small soil concentrations (0.2-1.5ppm), yet may produce plant toxicity symptoms readily as the amount in the soil solution increases over 2ppm. Boron is present in significant amounts in recycled materials such as municipal solid waste (MSW) and coal fly ash, and therefore composts containing these ingredients may potentially exceed ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Label policies, marketing strategies and technical developements of compost market in the European countries

    Traditionally the use of soil improvers in agriculture is aimed at the restoration of the organic substance removed from the agro-ecosystem by crops. The addition of humus, as replacement for the portion gradually mineralised by the micro-organisms of the soil, leads to the conservation of its fertility under many point of view: physical (e.g. porosity, drainage, aeration), chemical (availability ...


    By ORBIT e.V.

  • The effect of amendment of vegetable waste compost used as substrate in soilless culture on yield and quality of melon crops

    One of the main environmental impacts of forced systems in horticulture — such as plastic covered and soilless culture — is the generation of organic plant residues and substrate waste. Many people are keen on research and development of ecologically friendly substrates. Thus, leaching experiments have been carried out with distilled water to determine whether compost — from horticultural ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • An assessment of the suitability of backyard produced compost as a potting soil

    Current scientific knowledge of compost is largely derived from research into commercially produced green compost. This has shown that such compost tends to have high pH, high conductivity, and potential for organic and/or mineral pollutants and therefore can be problematic for use in growing media at high inclusion rates. Little work has been undertaken at an amateur composting scale and it is ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Science & Utilization: Current research

    Materials and Methods Composting To Eradicate Fusarium Graminearum From Infested Livestock FeedInvestigators: Francis J. Larney, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Research Centre, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada; T. Kelly Turkington, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Research Centre, Lacombe, Alberta, Canada Objectives: Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, could potentially become a ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Science & Utilization Current research June 2007

    CROP RESPONSE Growth and transpiration of tomato seedlings grown in hazelnut husk compost under water stress Investigator: Damla Bender Ozenc, Ordu University, Department of Soil Science, Ordu, Turkey Objectives: To determine effects of composted hazelnut husk (CHH) on tomato seedlings grown under water stress conditions. Seven media were prepared using CHH mixed, in different ratios, with native ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Utilization goes Through the Roof

    Untitled Document Center for Green Roof Research at Penn State University uses compost in its media studies and plans to explore microbial communities. AT the Penn State ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • WEDA Appoints New Vice President – Canada

    The Western Equipment Dealers Association (WEDA) is pleased to announce that Larry Hertz has joined the organization as Regional Vice President – Canada. Hertz will play a major role in expanding and enhancing WEDA’s Canadian government affairs and manufacturer relations advocacy by working on issues that impact WEDA and its Canadian dealer members. “Larry has a solid ...

  • Compost Purchasing: Using Specifications to Expand Markets

    As part of its market development initiatives for urban bulk procurement of organics, the California Integrated Waste Management Board (CIWMB) focused on preparing model specifications to assist purchasing of both compost and mulch. The aim was not to provide a single “best” specification, but to offer a series of “illustrative draft specs,” varying according to end user requirements. In ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Plays Key Role in Green Roof Mixes

    Untitled Document ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Coco peat (Coir pith, coir fiber peat) is an Environmentally Sustainable Product for the Horticultural & Agricultural sector

    Coconut fiber usage has become very common among professionals in various industries due to the versatility of the product. In the horticultural, agricultural, or erosion control sector, coir has a remarkable reputation for its superiority to other available natural materials in the market. Coir fiber is found between the husk & the outer shell of a coconut husk. The individual fiber cells ...


    By CoirGreen

  • Landfill Ban Stimulates Composting Programs in Nova Scotia

    On the East coast of Canada and almost completely surrounded by water, Nova Scotia is connected to the North American continent by only a small strip of land. While not large in population (935,000), the province has a large rural sector. Halifax, the capital city, has a population of 359,000. The second largest municipality, Cape Breton Regional Municipality, has a population of about 120,000. ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composting Hits Home Runs Across Canada

    Untitled Document ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • How three U.S. mini-farms are sowing the seeds of global food security

    Tiny, biointensive operations show smallholder farmers from around the world how they can grow far more food than conventional approaches. Her face shaded by a wide-brimmed straw hat, Olawumi Benedict is cheerfully tending to her “little babies” — kale seedlings growing in shallow wooden flats until they’re hardy enough for transplantation into soil beds. Three miles over ...


    By Ensia

  • Redefining ag-wastes as coproducts

    Alan Doering doesn’t have the word “waste” in his vocabulary. As the scientist heading up the Agricultural Utilization Research Institute’s (AURI) coproduct utilization program, Doering sees crop residue, agricultural processing leftovers and biomass as products with value worth exploring. “Every leftover or coproduct has a value,” Doering says. “Our goal is to find the best use with the highest ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Top trends conservationists should be paying attention to — but aren’t

    Artificial intelligence, testosterone and ship tracking technology probably aren’t on many conservation organizations’ “top things to think about” lists right now. But they should be, suggests a new report in the scientific journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution. ...


    By Ensia

  • The complex nature of GMOs calls for a new conversation

    An honest discussion of genetically modified organisms must move beyond narrow concepts of human health to the wider social and environmental impacts of engineered crops. The GMO debate is one from which I’ve kept a purposeful distance. For one thing, it’s an issue that has already garnered more than its fair share of attention. For another, when you consider that many ...


    By Ensia

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