plant immunity Articles

  • Recognition of the Magnaporthe oryzae effector AVR-Pia by the decoy domain of the rice NLR immune receptor RGA5

    Abstract Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs) are important receptors in plant immunity that allow recognition of pathogen effectors. The rice NLR RGA5 recognizes the Magnaporthe oryzae effector AVR-Pia through direct interaction. Here, we gained detailed insights into the molecular and structural bases of AVR-Pia-RGA5 interaction and the role of the RATX1 decoy ...


    By H Smith Plastics LTD

  • Induced Genome-wide binding of three Arabidopsis WRKY transcription factors during early MAMP-Triggered Immunity

    Abstract During microbial-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-triggered immunity (MTI) molecules derived from microbes are perceived by cell surface receptors and upon signaling to the nucleus initiate a massive transcriptional reprogramming critical to mount an appropriate host defense response. WRKY transcription factors play an important role in regulating these transcriptional processes. ...


    By H Smith Plastics LTD

  • Parallels in fungal pathogenesis on plant and animal hosts

    Fungi are important pathogens of plants and cause more significant yield losses than bacteria or viruses. However, bacteria and viruses are more important than fungi as pathogens of animals; indeed, whether or not a fungus even becomes pathogenic on an animal often depends on the immune status of the host. Until the rapid rise of opportunistic ...

  • Parallels in fungal pathogenesis on plant and animal hosts

    Fungi are important pathogens of plants and cause more significant yield losses than bacteria or viruses. However, bacteria and viruses are more important than fungi as pathogens of animals; indeed, whether or not a fungus even becomes pathogenic on an animal often depends on the immune status of the host. Until the rapid rise of opportunistic fungal infections in humans, pathogenicity mechanisms ...

  • An autophagy-related kinase is essential for the symbiotic relationship between Phaseolus vulgaris and both rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Eukaryotes contain three types of lipid kinases that belong to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) family. In plants and Saccharomyces, only PI3K class III family members have been identified. These enzymes regulate the innate immune response, intracellular trafficking, autophagy, and senescence. Here, we report that RNAi-mediated down-regulation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) PI3K ...


    By H Smith Plastics LTD

  • Reaction of soybean rust-resistant lines identified in paraguay to mississippi isolates of phakopsora pachyrhizi

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi is the causal agent of Asian soybean rust (ASR). Since the discovery of ASR in North America in 2004, evaluation of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] lines with U.S. isolates has become an important objective to identify resistance sources to the pathogen. In this study, 10 plant introductions (PIs) previously identified as resistant in Paraguay were evaluated using three ASR ...

  • Translocation for conservation: helping or harming wild populations?

    The value of moving animals or plants from a stable population into one that is endangered or even extinct has been questioned, with some suggesting that it will mean that the new population is not well adapted to its environment. However, research on an endangered toad has shown that even when individuals were translocated from great distances, the population was able to genetically adapt to ...

  • It’s time to stop overspending our freshwater budget

    If freshwater is to remain a renewable resource, we must balance supply and demand on farms, in cities, in industry and in power production. When you look to the year ahead, what do you see? Ensia recently invited eight global thought leaders to share their thoughts. In this interview with Ensia contributor Lisa Palmer, World Resources Institute Global Water Program director Betsy Otto responds ...


    By Ensia

  • Prevent Fish Kill in the Spring

    Pond Deicing Can Help Prevent Fish Kill Keeping the pond open will help keep oxygen in the water, attract water fowl and help prevent fish kills in the spring. The most common cause of fish kills is suffocation due to lack of dissolved oxygen. Most dissolved oxygen is produced by algae and aquatic plants through photosynthesis. A lesser but also important source of oxygen in water ...


    By Keeton Industries, Inc.

  • VeggieFresh LED releases the TLM25 LED grow light for home growers and juice fast enthusiasts

    Gardeners and health enthusiasts can enjoy fresh organic juices all year round, made from produce grown indoors using newly released technology from VeggieFresh LED. From wheatgrass and spinach to grapes and bananas, anything that can grow outside will grow inside with LED Grow Lights. The team at VeggieFresh LED are focusing a considerable amount of research on juicing as both partners have used ...


    By Veggie Fresh LED

  • How CRISPR Works

    Back in 2011, Jennifer Doudna, a biochemist and molecular biologist at the University of California, Berkeley, and Emmanuelle Charpentier, now at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Germany, grew intrigued by the way bacteria use a molecular system known as CRISPR-Cas9 to respond to viral attacks. For years, bacteria were assumed to be primitive creatures with rudimentary immune ...


    By Ensia

  • Main Applications of Truck Mounted ULV Fogger

    A fogger is a machine which distributes chemicals such as insecticide or disinfectant into an area by means of a fine spray for killing insects and other arthropods. They are often used by consumers as a low-cost alternative to professional pest control services. The number of fogger needed for pest control depends on the size of the space needed to treat. There are different types of ...

  • The Man Who Discovered the "Divine Materials" in Compost

    Untitled Document BioCycle July 2004, Vol. 45, No. 7, p. 58 Compost life continues bright, vigorous and upstream for Harry Hoitink, as he ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Fungal diseases are on the rise. Is environmental change to blame?

    Scientists and physicians are looking for clues to a worrying increase in fungal infections and exploring ways to reduce the threat. ...


    By Ensia

  • CRISPR is coming to agriculture — with big implications for food, farmers, consumers and nature

    Gene editing offers dramatic advances in speed, scope and scale of genetic improvement. It also offers an opportunity for more nuanced GMO governance. Very few technologies truly merit the epithet “game changer” — but a new genetic engineering tool known as CRISPR-Cas9 is one of them. Since we first developed the ability to alter the genetic material inside a plant or animal in ...


    By Ensia

  • We’re all in this together — let’s start acting like it

    Vaccines have sparked a conversation about the need to collectively protect each other — a conversation we need to apply to environmental challenges. Ever since a small percentage of U.S. parents decided to delay or forgo vaccinating their children against diseases like measles and whooping cough — some of which have been ...


    By Ensia

  • Let the kids go wild outdoors

    A number of international studies have shown that children in developed nations spend an average of 55 hours a week indoors using electronics. Even though this means that the youth in these countries are techno-savvy, it often results in them spending less and less time outdoors. How do we change this, and get our kids to experience the wonders of nature, develop creativity and learn to ...


    By green24

  • What’s Happening to the Birds?

    Following in Rachel Carson’s footsteps, a new generation of scientists investigates a new generation of pesticides. Christy Morrissey is driving her white pickup truck along Canada’s endless prairie highway, windows open, listening for birds. She points to the scatter of ponds glinting in the landscape, nestled among fields of canola that stretch as far as the eye ...


    By Ensia

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Backyard Composting Developments

    Untitled Document ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you