plant pathogen research Articles

  • Molecular genetics of pathogenic oomycetes

    Parasitic and pathogenic lifestyles have evolved repeatedly in eukaryotes (93). Several parasitic eukaryotes represent deep phylogenetic lineages, suggesting that they feature unique molecular processes for infecting their hosts. One such group is formed by the oomycetes. Traditionally, due to their filamentous growth habit, oomycetes have been classified in the kingdom Fungi. However, modern ...

  • Compost Science & Utilization: Current research

    Materials and Methods Composting To Eradicate Fusarium Graminearum From Infested Livestock FeedInvestigators: Francis J. Larney, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Research Centre, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada; T. Kelly Turkington, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Research Centre, Lacombe, Alberta, Canada Objectives: Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, could potentially become a ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Science & Utilization current research March 2007

    Crop Response Extractability, plant yield and toxicity thresholds for boron in compost Investigators: William F. Brinton and Eric Evans, Woods End Research Laboratory, Inc., Mt. Vernon, Maine Objectives: To determine the quantity of total and water-soluble boron in compost and other sources and their relationship to plant performance and toxicity symptoms; and to establish toxicity thresholds ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Science & Utilization Current research June 2007

    CROP RESPONSE Growth and transpiration of tomato seedlings grown in hazelnut husk compost under water stress Investigator: Damla Bender Ozenc, Ordu University, Department of Soil Science, Ordu, Turkey Objectives: To determine effects of composted hazelnut husk (CHH) on tomato seedlings grown under water stress conditions. Seven media were prepared using CHH mixed, in different ratios, with native ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Ontario Horticulture Research Priority Report 2016

    Sector Consultation The Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association partnered with Vineland to host a research strategy workshop in November 2014 with the goal of defining the top five research priorities for each crop group. Grower organizations were invited to nominate two representatives to participate on their behalf and a number of researchers from relevant fields were invited to ...

  • Using Compost To Control Plant Diseases

    Losses due to soilborne diseases on some greenhouse, nursery and vegetable crops can amount to thousands of dollars per acre annually. Until the 1930s, organic amendments — consisting of animal and green manures, coupled with crop rotation — were principal methods of control. But these approaches were largely abandoned for reasons of cost and inconvenience after commercial fertilizers and the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Research Analysis of the Market Potential For Lower Grade Composted Materials in the UK

    Executive Summary 1. Description This report presents the findings of research undertaken by WRc, under contract to the Waste andResources Action Programme (WRAP). The research analysed the market potential for low grade composted materials in the UK, taking the risks associated with their use in different applications into account. It also assessed the viability of ...


    By WRc plc

  • Non-chemical Pre-plant Soil Disinfestation

    The battle with pests, diseases and weeds is an everyday problem for every farmer. Due to the fact that 40% of the world’s food production is lost due to pests and diseases, farmers need to manage crop protection. An excellent example of the need for pesticides is cotton. It is a crop that is affected by various pests. Cotton farming accounts for more than 25% of all insecticides and 12% of ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Cattail plants’ Biomass as a bulking agent in sewage Sludge composting and the effect of the produced Compost on cattail plants’ Growth

    In every Greek island there is at least one town with more than 20,000 inhabitants. Several smaller towns and villages range from a few hundreds to a few thousands in population. Usually in the larger towns there are sewage treatment facilities providing at least secondary treatment of wastewater. In most cases the effluent produced is drained to the sea and the sludge is dumped in landfills. In ...


    By ORBIT e.V.

  • What is it about this soil that protects plants from devastating disease?

    Figuring out why certain soils keep plant parasites at bay could be a boon for agriculture around the globe Plants around the world are constantly under attack — often with big implications for humans. In the 1960s, millions of elm trees in Britain, France and the U.S. fell victim to Dutch elm disease, which clogs the vessels that carry life-giving water to the trees’ leaves. ...


    By Ensia

  • Biopesticides Examined for Role in Field Production

    Biopesticides deserve respect. Once derided as snake oil, today’s products have proven benefits in suppressing pest organisms. Whether they activate plant defenses, parasitize or inhibit pathogen growth or make the environment less favourable to disease, they can play an integral role in crop protection. While the greenhouse sector first excelled at incorporating biopesticides in controlled ...

  • Playing hide and seek below the soil

    Below the soil of a diverse grassland area you’ll find a jungle of plant roots. It is also home to a wide variety of bacteria and fungi, of which some are pathogenic and looking for a host in the tangle of roots. It appears that this is much more difficult when there is a larger diversity of plants as the host plant is more able to hide among the varied crowd. Greater plant diversity ...

  • Effect of ethylene on fruits and vegetables rotting

    In the latest edition of Bioconservacion's Partner Meeting with all its partners from the post-harvest sector, we had the good fortune to have Professor Emeritus Ron Wills from the University of Newcastle in Australia. Dr Wills, with over 50 years experience researching agronomy, agriculture and post-harvest techniques is undoubtedly a leader in the sector and one of the great experts on ethylene ...


    By Bioconservacion SA

  • Evaluating Microbiology of Compost

    The fact that not all compost is created equal has both producers and growers looking for ways to successfully evaluate compost quality. Traditional compost analysis has focused on NPK and micronutrient concentrations in an effort to mirror fertilizer analysis. Compost, however, is much more complex than fertilizer and its most significant value to the grower may be far more than its mineral ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Crop protection 2.0: reducing environmental impact in the EU Is it feasible?

    By 2023 all EU member states must be complying with more stringent guidelines related to Integrated Pest Management (IPM). “The essence of the new guideline is reducing the environmental impact of pesticides,” says Piet Boonekamp, manager of the Bio-interactions and Plant Health business unit at Wageningen UR. “In principle this European goal can be achieved, as has been shown ...

  • Minimizing health risks during secondary effluent application via subsurface drip irrigation

    Health risks posed on consumers due to the use of agricultural products irrigated with reclaimed wastewater were assessed by numerical simulation. The analysis is based on defining of an Exposure Model (EM) which takes into account several parameters: (i) the quality of the applied wastewater, (ii) the irrigation method, (iii) the elapsed times between irrigation, harvest, and product ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Organic Soil for Healthy Crops and Gardens, Black Worm Castings, Vermaplex

    Creating a healthy organic garden is easier than you think. It all starts with the soil. As a gardener or farmer your goal is healthy plants that yield plentiful of flowers, fruits and vegetables. Your first priority should be the soil, it is the key ingredient to a thriving garden. Plants receive their nutrients from the soil. They are dependent on a soil full of ...


    By Vermitechnology Unlimited

  • Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization response to three seed-applied fungicides

    In soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) enhance nutrient and water status and may increase root resistance to soilborne pathogens. However, the fungicides that are routinely applied to the seed may reduce AM colonization, reducing these benefits. Thus, the objective of this research was to assess the effect of three commonly used seed-applied fungicides on AM colonization ...

  • Cheap chemicals entice caterpillar-eating wasps to crops

    It may be a win-win situation: treating seeds with commercially available growth promoters before planting could have the added benefit of attracting parasitic wasps that feed on caterpillar pests, suggests a study. The protective effect of these cheap, commercially available chemicals, known as ‘plant strengtheners’, can help protect young ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Evaluation of compost for use as a soil amendment in corn and soybean production

    The purpose of this research project was to 1) evaluate rate of compost application and 2) to compare compost with uncomposted raw material and inorganic fertilizer N application upon maize and soybean growth and productivity, and upon soil characteristics. During the first three years of the study, the source of uncomposted material and compost was food waste and ground newsprint. During years 4 ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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