plant pathogen test Articles

  • The sensitivity ratio: A superior method to compare plant and pathogen screening tests

    There are numerous plant disease-screening methods used to identify resistance in various crops. It is common practice to prefer the screening method with the smallest root mean square error (RMSE), least-significant difference (LSD), or coefficient of variation (CV). However, valid comparison based on the RMSE or LSD requires both methods to have the same scale while the CV is only applicable if ...

  • Evaluating Microbiology of Compost

    The fact that not all compost is created equal has both producers and growers looking for ways to successfully evaluate compost quality. Traditional compost analysis has focused on NPK and micronutrient concentrations in an effort to mirror fertilizer analysis. Compost, however, is much more complex than fertilizer and its most significant value to the grower may be far more than its mineral ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Playing hide and seek below the soil

    Below the soil of a diverse grassland area you’ll find a jungle of plant roots. It is also home to a wide variety of bacteria and fungi, of which some are pathogenic and looking for a host in the tangle of roots. It appears that this is much more difficult when there is a larger diversity of plants as the host plant is more able to hide among the varied crowd. Greater plant diversity ...

  • Soil microbial, fungal, and nematode responses to soil fumigation and cover crops under potato production

    Abstract  Sodium N-methyldithiocarbamate (metam sodium) and 1,3 dichloropropene are widely used in potato production for the control of soil-borne pathogens, weeds, and plant parasitic nematodes that reduce crop yield and quality. Soil fumigation with metam sodium has been shown in microcosm studies to significantly reduce soil microbial populations and important soil processes such as C ...


  • Microbial communities of Solanum tuberosum and magainin-producing transgenic lines

    Antimicrobial peptide magainin II, isolated from the skin of the African clawed toad, has shown activity in vitro against a range of micro-organisms. Transgenic potato lines expressing a synthetic magainin gene show improved resistance to the bacterial plant pathogen, Erwinia carotovora. Culturable bacterial and fungal communities associated with magainin-producing potato plants were compared ...


    By Springer

  • Bulk carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen stable isotope composition of recent resins from amber-producing Hymenaea

    Antimicrobial peptide magainin II, isolated from the skin of the African clawed toad, has shown activity in vitro against a range of micro-organisms. Transgenic potato lines expressing a synthetic magainin gene show improved resistance to the bacterial plant pathogen, Erwinia carotovora. Culturable bacterial and fungal communities associated with magainin-producing potato plants were compared ...


    By Springer

  • Fecal sludge-derived pellet fertilizer in maize cultivation

    Fecal sludge (FS) contains significant amounts of plant nutrients and organic matter although it also contains pathogens. Therefore, FS can be used as fertilizer after proper sanitization. This study was designed to test dried fecal sludge (DFS)-based pellet fertilizers on maize cultivation. The DFS fertilizers were produced by composting, co-composting with sawdust, or irradiated by ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Composting Livestock Mortalities

    Performance, composting methods, environmental impacts and biosecurity of the process are evaluated for emergency disposal of cattle by research team at Iowa State University. A THREE-YEAR study was commissioned by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources to evaluate the practical feasibility, performance, environmental impacts and biosecurity of using composting for emergency disposal - should a ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Redefining ag-wastes as coproducts

    Alan Doering doesn’t have the word “waste” in his vocabulary. As the scientist heading up the Agricultural Utilization Research Institute’s (AURI) coproduct utilization program, Doering sees crop residue, agricultural processing leftovers and biomass as products with value worth exploring. “Every leftover or coproduct has a value,” Doering says. “Our goal is to find the best use with the highest ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • One crop, two ways, multiple benefits

    Nitrogen fixation is one of the best examples of cooperation in nature. Soil microbes – naturally occurring bacteria in the soil – work with plants to pull nitrogen from the air. They turn the nitrogen into a form the plant is able to use. In return, the plant lets the microbes eat some of the sugars it makes. Faba beans (also called fava beans) are one example of plants that work ...

  • Understanding Compost Tea

     Understanding Compost Tea COMPOST TEA describes many different preparations made using compost as a starting material and producing a liquid extract or in some cases a “liquid version” of the original compost. There are many home-designed pieces of equipment and some commercially available equipment made to produce compost tea. New ideas abound on how to fabricate the better tea-maker and ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Commercial Experiences :Time for (compost) Tea in the Northwest

     Understanding Compost Tea COMPOST TEA describes many different preparations made using compost as a starting material and producing a liquid extract or in some cases a “liquid version” of the original compost. There are many home-designed pieces of equipment and some commercially available equipment made to produce compost tea. New ideas abound on how to fabricate the better tea-maker and ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • The Man Who Discovered the "Divine Materials" in Compost

    Untitled Document BioCycle July 2004, Vol. 45, No. 7, p. 58 Compost life continues bright, vigorous and upstream for Harry Hoitink, as he ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Science & Utilization current research March 2007

    Crop Response Extractability, plant yield and toxicity thresholds for boron in compost Investigators: William F. Brinton and Eric Evans, Woods End Research Laboratory, Inc., Mt. Vernon, Maine Objectives: To determine the quantity of total and water-soluble boron in compost and other sources and their relationship to plant performance and toxicity symptoms; and to establish toxicity thresholds ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Science & Utilization Current research June 2007

    CROP RESPONSE Growth and transpiration of tomato seedlings grown in hazelnut husk compost under water stress Investigator: Damla Bender Ozenc, Ordu University, Department of Soil Science, Ordu, Turkey Objectives: To determine effects of composted hazelnut husk (CHH) on tomato seedlings grown under water stress conditions. Seven media were prepared using CHH mixed, in different ratios, with native ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Backyard Composting Developments

    Untitled Document ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • California agencies partner to increase compost use on roadsides

    THE California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) has enormous potential to increase compost use on highway roadsides throughout California. Caltrans manages more than 230,000 acres of roadside and maintains approximately 25,000 acres of landscaping annually. In the last three years, Caltrans has increased its purchase of compost and mulch products fivefold — from 13,700 cubic yards in 2004 ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • The Latest in Whitefly Control

    Next month’s Greenhouse Canada Grower Day is welcoming leading researchers and crop specialists to help you tackle one of the industry’s biggest challenges. Whitefly is proving to be one of the most difficult pests to control, mainly due to the lack of effective registered chemicals that can eradicate silverleaf whitefly. It is also due to the unwillingness of biological suppliers to ...

  • Compost Science & Utilization: Current research

    Materials and Methods Composting To Eradicate Fusarium Graminearum From Infested Livestock FeedInvestigators: Francis J. Larney, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Research Centre, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada; T. Kelly Turkington, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Research Centre, Lacombe, Alberta, Canada Objectives: Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, could potentially become a ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composters Build Strong Links to California Farms

    The rapidly increasing amounts of compost applied to California farms can be traced to numerous factors — better crops, fewer disease problems, greater emphasis on product quality, mandated state recycling goals, savings in disposal costs and savings in chemical inputs. And then there’s the factor of friendship, longtime personal relationships that build trust between composters and farm ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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