plant protection natural pesticide Articles

  • Keyhole Gardens; Positive Impact on Food Security

    World hunger is a constant problem. It has been one of the most widely discussed topics in recent years. Rapidly increasing global population, limited natural resources, and climatic changes, has resulted in the need for a sustainable increase in food production. Scientists, governments, and organizations across the world are working together to bring innovations and good farming practices which ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Development of Waste Sawdust as a plant protection material for horticulture and agriculture

    Untitled Document Lignin is one of the major wastes of modern society, in the form of wood waste such as sawdust. In nature, lignin is ...

  • What is it about this soil that protects plants from devastating disease?

    Figuring out why certain soils keep plant parasites at bay could be a boon for agriculture around the globe Plants around the world are constantly under attack — often with big implications for humans. In the 1960s, millions of elm trees in Britain, France and the U.S. fell victim to Dutch elm disease, which clogs the vessels that carry life-giving water to the trees’ leaves. ...


    By Ensia

  • New tools and farmer training could revolutionize pesticide management in West Africa

    Field schools that train farmers in alternative methods of pest control have succeeded in nearly eliminating the use of toxic pesticides by a community of cotton growers in Mali, according to a new FAO study published today by the London-based Royal Society. The study was conducted in two areas - the Bla ...

  • The complex nature of GMOs calls for a new conversation

    An honest discussion of genetically modified organisms must move beyond narrow concepts of human health to the wider social and environmental impacts of engineered crops. The GMO debate is one from which I’ve kept a purposeful distance. For one thing, it’s an issue that has already garnered more than its fair share of attention. For another, when you consider that many ...


    By Ensia

  • Characterization of field margins in intensified agro‐ecosystems – why narrow margins should matter in terrestrial pesticide risk assessment and management

    Field margins are important semi‐natural habitats in agro‐ecosystems but they can be negatively affected by pesticide inputs via direct overspray and spray drift. In Germany, risk mitigation measures (like buffer zones) to reduce pesticide inputs in terrestrial non‐crop habitats do not have to be put in place by farmers next to narrow field margins ( ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • CRISPR is coming to agriculture — with big implications for food, farmers, consumers and nature

    Gene editing offers dramatic advances in speed, scope and scale of genetic improvement. It also offers an opportunity for more nuanced GMO governance. Very few technologies truly merit the epithet “game changer” — but a new genetic engineering tool known as CRISPR-Cas9 is one of them. Since we first developed the ability to alter the genetic material inside a plant or animal in ...


    By Ensia

  • Could traditional plants hold the secret to saving crops from pests?

    Researchers build on age-old practices to reduce food loss in Africa Without any effort at all, Hawa Saidi Ibura crushes dried beans, one at a time, between her fingers outside her home in Endagaw, a village in northern Tanzania. She’s holding a basket of a type of red bean eaten all over East Africa, but these beans ...


    By Ensia

  • Biotechnology for Environmentally Safe Agriculture

    Issue: In Europe some uses of biotechnology are meeting vocal opposition from certain quarters. Nevertheless, the vast amount of knowledge acquired recently in biology can be used to develop and apply biotechnology for an environmentally safe agriculture. Public acceptance and a new policy impetus can serve to promote the introduction of safe and competitive agricultural technologies that have a ...

  • What’s Happening to the Birds?

    Following in Rachel Carson’s footsteps, a new generation of scientists investigates a new generation of pesticides. Christy Morrissey is driving her white pickup truck along Canada’s endless prairie highway, windows open, listening for birds. She points to the scatter of ponds glinting in the landscape, nestled among fields of canola that stretch as far as the eye ...


    By Ensia

  • Are Conventional Farmers Becoming Interested in Organic Practices?

    Despite the fact that farming is one of the most important human activities that brings food to our tables, it contributes significantly to global pollution. Unsustainable farm practices result in the loss of biodiversity, climate changes, erosion, and the pollution of soil and water. However, when managed in a sustainable way, farming can be a source of solutions for future demands. Organic ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Impact of Agri-environment measures

    The application of agri-environment contracts concerning 1 farmer in every 7 and delivering environmental services over 20% of European farmland, marks a very significant step towards sustainability. The target set in the 5th Environmental Action Programme of 15% coverage by 2000 has thus already been exceeded. The requirement on Member States to apply the regulation throughout their territories ...

  • Organics in Action : Sustainable Practices Thrive In A National Park

    The Presidio is part of California’s Golden Gate National Recreation Area and the national park system. As an urban park on the northern edge of San Francisco, there are many challenges to be met in the quest to be a model of sustainability. An innovative composting program is becoming one way to help meet the park’s goals. Nearing the close of its second year, this program is well on its ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • The Man Who Discovered the "Divine Materials" in Compost

    Untitled Document BioCycle July 2004, Vol. 45, No. 7, p. 58 Compost life continues bright, vigorous and upstream for Harry Hoitink, as he ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • A Discussion Outlining Filtration Of Horticultural Water From Influent To Effluent

    Since the beginning of time mankind has found it difficult to manage it's natural resources primarily due to economic pressures, greed and power. It is evident from increased population and usage of water like never before that the Worlds potable water resources are slowly being depleted due to, extraction, waste, over usage, and contamination. As we entered the Twenty First Century ...


    By AguaSeguridad

  • Questions and Answers on Honey Bee Control

    Honey bees are valuable pollinators playing an important role in both native and agricultural crop production. Beekeepers keep bees in wooden manufactured hives, but the most common natural nest site for bees is a hollow tree or other cavity. Occasionally, honey bees may use a wall void or attic space in a house as a nesting site. In these situations, the decision to take action depends upon the ...


    By Master Bee Removal

  • Ontario Horticulture Research Priority Report 2016

    Sector Consultation The Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association partnered with Vineland to host a research strategy workshop in November 2014 with the goal of defining the top five research priorities for each crop group. Grower organizations were invited to nominate two representatives to participate on their behalf and a number of researchers from relevant fields were invited to ...

  • The newest strategy for saving bees is really, really old

    With pollinators in decline around the world, conservationists turn to traditional farmers for answers. In northwestern India, the Himalaya Mountains rise sharply out of pine and cedar forests. The foothills of the Kullu Valley are blanketed with apple trees beginning to bloom. It’s a cool spring morning, and Lihat Ram, a farmer in Nashala village, shows me a ...


    By Ensia

  • Going green in 2012: 12 steps for the developing world

    Many of us are thinking about the changes we want to make this year. For some, these changes will be financial; for others, physical or spiritual. But for all of us, there are important resolutions we can make to “green” our lives. Although this is often a subject focused on by industrialized nations, people in developing countries can also take important steps to reduce their growing ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • State Of Composting In The U.S.

    The benefits of composting are well documented. Compost is a valuable soil conditioner. It adds needed organic matter, sequesters carbon, improves plant growth, conserves water, reduces reliance on chemical pesticides and fertilizers, and helps prevent nutrient runoff and erosion. Composting also reduces the volume of materials that might otherwise be disposed in landfills or trash incinerators, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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