plant science Articles

  • What is the Future of Horticultural Science in Africa?

    Horticulture is a labour intensive sector that is important for human wellbeing: 'agriculture supplies protein, carbohydrates and staple crops - but we would have a pretty boring life without horticulture.' Nevertheless, in many countries, faculties of agriculture and their departments of horticulture have been swallowed by schools of life or earth sciences. As a result horticulture gets ...

  • Compost science journal of advocacy and foresight

    SEVERAL months ago, I started on a journey through the pages of Compost Science, beginning with the Spring, 1960 inaugural issue. I was confident that I could whip through the articles and news items in the several hundred issues of the magazine between 1960 and 2009, and be prepared to write this article for BioCycle’s 50th Anniversary Commemorative Edition. Granted, there were interruptions, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Science & Utilization: Current research

    Materials and Methods Composting To Eradicate Fusarium Graminearum From Infested Livestock FeedInvestigators: Francis J. Larney, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Research Centre, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada; T. Kelly Turkington, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Research Centre, Lacombe, Alberta, Canada Objectives: Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, could potentially become a ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Science & Utilization current research March 2007

    Crop Response Extractability, plant yield and toxicity thresholds for boron in compost Investigators: William F. Brinton and Eric Evans, Woods End Research Laboratory, Inc., Mt. Vernon, Maine Objectives: To determine the quantity of total and water-soluble boron in compost and other sources and their relationship to plant performance and toxicity symptoms; and to establish toxicity thresholds ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Science & Utilization Current research June 2007

    CROP RESPONSE Growth and transpiration of tomato seedlings grown in hazelnut husk compost under water stress Investigator: Damla Bender Ozenc, Ordu University, Department of Soil Science, Ordu, Turkey Objectives: To determine effects of composted hazelnut husk (CHH) on tomato seedlings grown under water stress conditions. Seven media were prepared using CHH mixed, in different ratios, with native ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Science’s role in growing diverse, nutritious food

    Can science meet the demand for more diverse and nutritious food? Jan Piotrowski investigates. The riots that swept Africa in 2007 and 2008 in response to the spiralling costs of staple crops brought the effects of food shortages into sharp focus. Images of unrest circled the globe, and the consequent instability brought to the forefront of political debate a question that had ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Soil science gains voice in the US government

    The Soil Science Society of America’s (SSSA) Science Policy Office, started in 1986 and based in Washington, DC, educates United States (US) federal government policymakers about and advocates for soil and the soil sciences. As a result, US agricultural, natural resources and environmental legislation and corresponding federal rules and regulations are more scientifically sound and appropriately ...

  • Is Horticultural Science in Crisis? What is Needed to Assure Its Future?

    "Kenya has a shortage of competent horticultural staff at institutional and commercial levels." "Horticulture is facing a crisis in the United Kingdom." "Is horticulture a withering field in the USA?" "Concerns over shortage of agriculture graduates In Australia." "Uganda's flower sector faces an imminent shortage of qualified managers and supervisors in flower ...

  • How plants grow and develop

    How does a complete plant with stems, leafs and flowers develop from a tiny clump of seemingly identical cells? For a very long time, the mechanism of tissue formation in plants remained unclear. The biochemists from Wageningen University also would not have come up with the answer if it wasn’t for their model building colleagues that simulated plant development with their mathematical ...

  • HCBD uptake into edible plant

    Client: Confidential Location: UK Services: Research and Development, Human Health Risk Assessment Summary: This research programme increased the knowledge base regarding uptake of HCBD, enabling a better understanding of exposures to this compound in the environment During discussions with the public and within ...

  • Uptake and distribution of Iodine in Rice plants

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants were cultivated in an experimental field and separated at harvest into different components, including polished rice, rice bran, hull, straw, and root. The contents of iodine in these components and the soil were determined by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry and radiochemical neutron activation analysis, respectively. Iodine content varied by more than ...

  • Use of plant growth-promoting bacteria for biocontrol of plant diseases: principles, mechanisms of action, and future prospects

    Laboratoire de Stress, Défenses et Reproduction des Plantes, Unité de Recherche Vignes et Vins de Champagne, UPRES EA 2069, UFR Sciences, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, 51687 Reims Cedex 2, France,  Agroscope FAW Wädenswil, Swiss Federal Research Institute for Fruit Production, Viticulture, and Horticulture, CH-8820 Wädenswil, Switzerland, Department of Horticulture, Virginia Polytechnic ...

  • Analysis of high yielding, early-planted soybean in Indiana

    A trend toward early planting of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in Indiana results in higher yield, but the limit to which a positive response to early planting occurs has not been evaluated. Our objective was to determine how early planting affects yield components and seed composition of indeterminate soybean planted in late March through early June in Indiana. Three cultivars (Pioneer brand ...

  • Could traditional plants hold the secret to saving crops from pests?

    Researchers build on age-old practices to reduce food loss in Africa Without any effort at all, Hawa Saidi Ibura crushes dried beans, one at a time, between her fingers outside her home in Endagaw, a village in northern Tanzania. She’s holding a basket of a type of red bean eaten all over East Africa, but these beans ...


    By Ensia

  • Recently planted vegetation strips reduce Giardia runoff reaching waterways

    Current methods for tracking pathogens across farmland and into surrounding waterways via runoff are limited and typically have been developed using artificially created landscapes. No studies have investigated how Giardia in farm runoff moves across the landscape, despite high prevalence rates in dairy cattle (Bos taurus) worldwide. Here, we report the development of a field-based tracking ...

  • New and old soybean cultivar responses to plant density and intercepted light

    Genetic gain for new soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars is substantial, and research suggests this is partially explained by greater tolerance to increased plant densities. We conducted an experiment to determine if greater tolerance to increased plant density and more efficient use of cumulative intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (CIPAR) partially explained the yield ...

  • Subsurface drip and overhead irrigation: a comparison of plant boll distribution in upland cotton

    Although subsurface drip (SSD) is used as a water-efficient alternative to overhead irrigation in many crops, the effects of SSD on the distribution of bolls on cotton plants (Gossypium hirsutum L.) have not been thoroughly examined. The purpose of this study was to add to the current knowledge about the effects of SSD on cotton yield dynamics. Cultivar DP 488 BG/RR was grown in three studies ...

  • Does skip-row planting configuration improve cotton net return?

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) growers want information about alternative planting configurations to reduce seed, technology, and other production costs. We evaluated the impact of solid and 2 x 1 skip-row configurations on net returns for cotton grown in 25-, 76-, and 102-cm rows based on yield and fiber quality data from an experiment in adjacent nonirrigated and irrigated fields at Milan, TN. ...

  • Late planting of short-season cotton in saline fields of the Yellow river delta

    Normal planting of full-season cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) (NPF) in saline fields of the Yellow River valley, China, is currently faced with poor stand establishment, late maturity, and increasing cost of inputs. Our objective was to determine if late planting of short-season cotton (LPS) may alleviate these problems. In the first experiment, the effects of cultivar, planting date, seeding ...

  • The sensitivity ratio: A superior method to compare plant and pathogen screening tests

    There are numerous plant disease-screening methods used to identify resistance in various crops. It is common practice to prefer the screening method with the smallest root mean square error (RMSE), least-significant difference (LSD), or coefficient of variation (CV). However, valid comparison based on the RMSE or LSD requires both methods to have the same scale while the CV is only applicable if ...

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