potato disease Articles

  • What’s your potato storage strategy?

    With potato harvest nearing completion, the challenge will now be to maintain the condition of the crop, right up until supply to the customer. “It’s really worth stopping to consider that what you put into storage, is reflective of what you get out post-storage,” explains Morley Benson of Certis. “By this, I mean the quality of potatoes going into store, as well as the ...


    By Certis UK

  • Tests of taxonomic and biogeographic predictivity: Resistance to disease and insect pests in wild relatives of cultivated potato

    A major justification for taxonomic and biogeographic research is its assumed ability to predict the presence of traits in a group for which the trait has been observed in only a representative subset of the group. Such predictors are regularly used by breeders interested in choosing potential sources of disease and pest resistant germplasm for cultivar improvement, by genebank managers to ...

  • Knowledge of Farm Practices – The Key for Successful Farming

    Agriculture plays an important part in the world economy. One-third of the economically active population obtains its livelihood from agriculture. In Asia and Africa, millions of small-scale farmers, fishermen, and indigenous people produce most of the food consumed worldwide, in most cases on very small plots of land. Agriculture is increasingly called upon to address a wide range of critical ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Potato yield and quality response to subsoil tillage and compaction

    Compacted soils have been found in intensively cultivated vegetable crop regions of Central Wisconsin, resulting in the wide scale use of subsoil tillage by growers. The goal of this project was to assess potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) yield and quality response to soil compaction and subsoil tillage. Potato quality factors evaluated were marketable yield, tuber size distribution, internal ...

  • What is it about this soil that protects plants from devastating disease?

    Figuring out why certain soils keep plant parasites at bay could be a boon for agriculture around the globe Plants around the world are constantly under attack — often with big implications for humans. In the 1960s, millions of elm trees in Britain, France and the U.S. fell victim to Dutch elm disease, which clogs the vessels that carry life-giving water to the trees’ leaves. ...


    By Ensia

  • Advancements in chemistry are providing growers with flexibility when managing slug pressures in potato crops.

    Flexibility in slug control The mild and wet weather and lack of ground frosts seen this winter, means that being vigilant to slug activity will be key as we move into the potato planting season. Andrew Sprunt, Agrii’s Northern region potato technical agronomist, explains what growers can expect from the season ahead, and how to manage the potential impact at farm level, ...


    By Certis UK

  • Crop protection 2.0: reducing environmental impact in the EU Is it feasible?

    By 2023 all EU member states must be complying with more stringent guidelines related to Integrated Pest Management (IPM). “The essence of the new guideline is reducing the environmental impact of pesticides,” says Piet Boonekamp, manager of the Bio-interactions and Plant Health business unit at Wageningen UR. “In principle this European goal can be achieved, as has been shown ...

  • Molecular genetics of pathogenic oomycetes

    Parasitic and pathogenic lifestyles have evolved repeatedly in eukaryotes (93). Several parasitic eukaryotes represent deep phylogenetic lineages, suggesting that they feature unique molecular processes for infecting their hosts. One such group is formed by the oomycetes. Traditionally, due to their filamentous growth habit, oomycetes have been classified in the kingdom Fungi. However, modern ...

  • Ontario Horticulture Research Priority Report 2016

    Sector Consultation The Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association partnered with Vineland to host a research strategy workshop in November 2014 with the goal of defining the top five research priorities for each crop group. Grower organizations were invited to nominate two representatives to participate on their behalf and a number of researchers from relevant fields were invited to ...

  • Food security faces growing pest advance

    Coming soon to a farm near you: just about every possible type of pest that could take advantage of the ripening harvest in the nearby fields. By 2050, according to new research in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography, those opportunistic viruses, bacteria, fungi, blights, ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Talking turkey: How bird flu outbreaks are playing out

    A deadly strain of bird flu has reached the Midwest, killing or requiring hundreds of thousands of turkeys to be euthanized. Some questions and answers about the outbreak: WHAT KIND OF FLU IS THIS, EXACTLY? H5N2 is a highly contagious virus that kills commercial poultry quickly once it gets into a barn. It can spread through an infected bird's droppings or nasal discharges - yes, ...


    By Associated Press

  • Pesticides in the European Union

    There has been a sharply falling trend in the total volume of sales of agricultural pesticides in the EU between 1991 and 1995. But this was reversed in 1996. From 1991-1995, EU sales of pesticides, measured by weight of active ingredients (ai), fell by 13%. They then rose by 6% between 1995 and 1996 to stand at 299,826 tonnes ai. But this still put them nearly 8% below the 1991 figure. The use ...

  • Arsenic in irrigated paddy soils

    Natural arsenic pollution of drinking water has been reported from over 70 countries world-wide, affecting an estimated 150 million people (Ravenscroft et. al., 2008). About 50 million of these people live in Bangladesh, 30 million in India and 33 million in six other countries of south and south-east Asia. It has recently been recognised that arsenic-contaminated groundwater used for irrigation ...

  • The developing world is awash in pesticides. Does it have to be?

    Herbicides, insecticides and fungicides threaten the environment and human health in many parts of the world. But research is pointing to a better approach. In today’s globalized world, it is not inconceivable that one might drink coffee from Colombia in the morning, munch cashews from Vietnam for lunch and gobble grains from Ethiopia for dinner. That we can enjoy these ...


    By Ensia

  • Understanding Compost Tea

     Understanding Compost Tea COMPOST TEA describes many different preparations made using compost as a starting material and producing a liquid extract or in some cases a “liquid version” of the original compost. There are many home-designed pieces of equipment and some commercially available equipment made to produce compost tea. New ideas abound on how to fabricate the better tea-maker and ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Commercial Experiences :Time for (compost) Tea in the Northwest

     Understanding Compost Tea COMPOST TEA describes many different preparations made using compost as a starting material and producing a liquid extract or in some cases a “liquid version” of the original compost. There are many home-designed pieces of equipment and some commercially available equipment made to produce compost tea. New ideas abound on how to fabricate the better tea-maker and ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • CRISPR is coming to agriculture — with big implications for food, farmers, consumers and nature

    Gene editing offers dramatic advances in speed, scope and scale of genetic improvement. It also offers an opportunity for more nuanced GMO governance. Very few technologies truly merit the epithet “game changer” — but a new genetic engineering tool known as CRISPR-Cas9 is one of them. Since we first developed the ability to alter the genetic material inside a plant or animal in ...


    By Ensia

  • Las Vegas DirtWorkz, Inc.: Using the City’s wood waste to farm the desert

    Ray Becerra knows a thing or two about recycling, reusing and repurposing waste materials. You might even say it’s in his blood. Becerra has spent his entire life around landfills and farming operations, and he wears his passion for recycling waste materials on his sleeve. His enthusiasm for dust, dirt and debris, says Becerra, comes from his father, an avid recycler who was involved in the ...

  • Crop gene banks are preserving the future of agriculture. But who’s preserving them?

    As climate change makes crop diversity even more important, gene banks struggle to stay afloat. During the past few years of civil war in Syria, rebel fighters have destroyed Shia mosques and Christian graves, and burned and looted Christian churches while the Islamic State group has demolished priceless artifacts in the region. Nothing seemed sacred to the disparate ...


    By Ensia

  • Emissions from Crops - POST Note

    Agriculture contributes 9% of the UK’s greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions burden and 10-12% globally. Although there is a long-term declining trend from UK agriculture, the sector may account for a larger share of overall emissions in the future as other sectors reduce emissions. This POSTnote focuses on reducing GHG emissions from growing and storing arable and horticultural crops. ...


    By UK Parliament

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