poultry export Articles

  • Free and Conjugated Estrogen Exports in Surface-Runoff from Poultry Litter–Amended Soil

    Land application of animal manures such as poultry litter is a common practice, especially in states with surplus manure. Past studies have shown that animal manure may contain estrogens, which are classified as endocrine-disrupting chemicals and may pose a threat to aquatic and wildlife species. We evaluated the concentrations of estrogens in surface runoff from experimental plots (5 × 12 ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Dutch Farmers Find It Pays To Manage Poultry Manure

    Poultry farmers in Holland face challenges similar to their North American counterparts in dealing with manure from concentrated operations where there is insufficient cropland for application. This creates a need for exporting manure from the producing farm to users in other places. Poultry operations in Holland differ from most North American poultry farms in that most are not vertically ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Take action to stop Chinese chicken imports

    In August of 2013 the New York Times reported that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) gave the green light to four Chinese poultry processors to ship processed poultry to the United States. The move was aimed to only ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Brazil’s agriculture minister optimistic about a Mercosur/EU trade accord by end of the yea

    Brazil’ minister of agriculture Katia Abreu said she was very optimistic about Mercosur reaching a trade agreement with the European Union, and if there are problems look to Europe, because Mercosur members have almost agreed and finished their proposal. Ms. Abreu is probably the strongest political woman in Brazil currently, not only because president Dilma Rousseff is much debilitated ...


    By TractorExport

  • Talking turkey: How bird flu outbreaks are playing out

    A deadly strain of bird flu has reached the Midwest, killing or requiring hundreds of thousands of turkeys to be euthanized. Some questions and answers about the outbreak: WHAT KIND OF FLU IS THIS, EXACTLY? H5N2 is a highly contagious virus that kills commercial poultry quickly once it gets into a barn. It can spread through an infected bird's droppings or nasal discharges - yes, ...


    By Associated Press

  • Growing demand for soybeans threatens Amazon rainforest

    Some 3,000 years ago, farmers in eastern China domesticated the soybean. In 1765, the first soybeans were planted in North America. Today the soybean occupies more U.S. cropland than wheat. And in Brazil, where it spread even more rapidly, the soybean is invading the Amazon rainforest. For close to two centuries after its introduction into the United States the soybean languished as a curiosity ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Global Grain Stocks Drop Dangerously Low as 2012 Consumption Exceeded Production

    The world produced 2,241 million tons of grain in 2012, down 75 million tons or 3 percent from the 2011 record harvest. The drop was largely because of droughts that devastated several major crops—namely corn in the United States (the world’s largest crop) and wheat in Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, and Australia. Each of these countries also is an important exporter. Global grain ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Data Highlight: Arab Grain Imports Rising Rapidly

    The Arab countries in the Middle East and North Africa make up only 5 percent of the world’s population, yet they take in more than 20 percent of the world’s grain exports. Imports to the region have jumped from 30 million tons of grain in 1990 to nearly 70 million tons in 2011. Now imported grain accounts for nearly 60 percent of regional grain consumption. With water scarce, arable ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Overfishing Threatens Critical Link in the Food Chain

    The fish near the bottom of the aquatic food chain are often overlooked, but they are vital to healthy oceans and estuaries. Collectively known as forage fish, these species—including sardines, anchovies, herrings, and shrimp-like crustaceans called krill—feed on plankton and become food themselves for larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Historically, people have eaten ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Bumper 2011 Grain Harvest Fails to Rebuild Global Stocks

    The world’s farmers produced more grain in 2011 than ever before. Estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture show the global grain harvest coming in at 2,295 million tons, up 53 million tons from the previous record in 2009. Consumption grew by 90 million tons over the same period to 2,280 million tons. Yet with global grain production actually falling short of consumption in 7 ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • What`s New - In-Vessel Composting

    IF YOU are considering some sort of enclosed vessel for composting food residuals, yard trimmings, biosolids, manure, animal mortalities or other waste streams, there is no shortage of options to consider. Domestic and international technology providers offer agitated and nonagitated enclosed systems, as well as rigid and nonrigid containment. Unlike some of the other equipment categories in ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Cost-Benefit Analyses: Exploring the Economics of On-Farm Composting

    When exploring the merits of on-farm composting, the question most often raised is: What are the economics? How do the savings or revenues from on-farm composting compare to the costs? Of course, the answer is the ever present “it depends.” Expenses, resources, revenue opportunities, environmental constraints and circumstances vary greatly from one farm to the next. Most people would agree that ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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