primary crop nutrient Articles

  • Performance of an optimized nutrient management system for double-cropped wheat-maize rotations in North-Central China

    Overapplication of N and P and insufficient supply of K are considered primary reasons for restriction of yield improvement in the North China Plain. Optimized nutrient management practices based on soil testing and yield targets have been developed. Other large scale field experiments have indicated that additional improvement for yield and nutrient use benefits is needed. The objective of this ...

  • Eutrophication: Sources and drivers of nutrient pollution

    Nutrient over-enrichment of freshwater and coastal ecosystems, or eutrophication, is a rapidly growing environmental crisis. Worldwide, the number of coastal areas impacted by eutrophication stands at over 500. In coastal areas, occurrences of dead zones, which are caused by eutrophic conditions, have increased from 10 documented cases in 1960 to 405 documented cases in 2008. In addition, many of ...

  • GWT- Agro-Z nutrient soil medium enhancer

    Genesis Water Technologies case study for GWT Agro-Z specialized natural soil enhancement medium. This case study document shows the differences between vegetables grown with GWT Agro-Z zeolite soil medium and vegetables grown without this medium. Trials of seedling plants grown with the GWT Agro-Z medium have shown improvements in primary root development. Studies have resulted in better ...

  • Emissions from Crops - POST Note

    Agriculture contributes 9% of the UK’s greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions burden and 10-12% globally. Although there is a long-term declining trend from UK agriculture, the sector may account for a larger share of overall emissions in the future as other sectors reduce emissions. This POSTnote focuses on reducing GHG emissions from growing and storing arable and horticultural crops. ...


    By UK Parliament

  • Family farms can be competitive by focusing on conservation and stewardship

    While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports a 40 percent decline in U.S. cropland soil erosion rates from 1982 to 2007, recent trends appear to challenge this progress. Record prices for corn and soybeans have diverted acres out of conservation programs and encouraged intensive production on a wide scale. Tree lines are cleared and wet areas drained, turning 120-acre farms into ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Unique Approach for Sizing a Reclaimed Water Spray Irrigation System Maximizes Benefits

    In 2004, the City of Raleigh Public Utilities Department (CORPUD) initiated a reclaimed water spray irrigation system project to irrigate approximately 130 acres of its existing 1,030-acre farmland used in the past to land apply Class B biosolids. Unlike typical land application or reclaimed water irrigation systems, the primary driver was not to minimize surface water discharge, but rather to ...

  • Five Ways to Manage the Soil for Planting

    The soil, as the primary resource for food production and the most important tool for every farmer, is crucial for farming. Successful farming begins with the quality soil, which provides water and essential nutrients to the crops. Rich and healthy soil, combined with the appropriate amount of water and sunlight can significantly contribute to global food production. Proper soil management ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Evaluating cumulative effects of anthropogenic inputs in Prince Edward Island estuaries using the mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    Estuarine eutrophication as a result of agricultural land use including the use of chemical fertilizers is increasing worldwide. Prince Edward Island, Canada has very high agricultural intensity by international standards with approximately 44% of the land area under production, and some watersheds in excess of 75% agricultural land‐use. The type of agriculture is also intensive with primarily ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Composting and local food merge st urban garden

    Growing Power (GP), a nonprofit urban garden and training center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, provides affordable produce to neighborhoods without access to fresh food, and processes a variety of organic wastes through composting and anaerobic digestion. Located on a two-acre lot on Milwaukee's north side, the six greenhouses and several hoop houses include raised beds for herbs and greens, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Questions and answers about Lake Erie toxic algae

    Hundreds of thousands of people in Toledo, Ohio, and nearby southeastern Michigan were unable to use tap water fromSaturday until Monday morning because of unsafe levels of a contaminant called microcystin in Lake Erie. Here are questions and answers about the situation: Q. What is microcystin? A. A toxin produced by microcystis, a type of ...


    By Associated Press

  • Evaluating Microbiology of Compost

    The fact that not all compost is created equal has both producers and growers looking for ways to successfully evaluate compost quality. Traditional compost analysis has focused on NPK and micronutrient concentrations in an effort to mirror fertilizer analysis. Compost, however, is much more complex than fertilizer and its most significant value to the grower may be far more than its mineral ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Ontario Horticulture Research Priority Report 2016

    Sector Consultation The Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association partnered with Vineland to host a research strategy workshop in November 2014 with the goal of defining the top five research priorities for each crop group. Grower organizations were invited to nominate two representatives to participate on their behalf and a number of researchers from relevant fields were invited to ...

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • The number one thing each of us can do to protect biodiversity

    Reducing our consumption of animal products can go a long way toward conserving endangered habitat around the world. Agriculture expansion is the leading driver of natural habitat loss worldwide. However, most of this growth is not to produce vegetables, fruits or grains to be eaten by people. Ecosystems are destroyed overwhelmingly to feed livestock. Livestock production ...


    By Ensia

  • Cost-Benefit Analyses: Exploring the Economics of On-Farm Composting

    When exploring the merits of on-farm composting, the question most often raised is: What are the economics? How do the savings or revenues from on-farm composting compare to the costs? Of course, the answer is the ever present “it depends.” Expenses, resources, revenue opportunities, environmental constraints and circumstances vary greatly from one farm to the next. Most people would agree that ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Compost Purchasing: Using Specifications to Expand Markets

    As part of its market development initiatives for urban bulk procurement of organics, the California Integrated Waste Management Board (CIWMB) focused on preparing model specifications to assist purchasing of both compost and mulch. The aim was not to provide a single “best” specification, but to offer a series of “illustrative draft specs,” varying according to end user requirements. In ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • California Vineyard Finds Large Role for Compost

    Untitled Document I CAME to Robert Sinskey Vineyards (RSV) with experience in both small and large-scale wine-grape farming, all of it in ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Biocycle World

    OPTIONS FOR MANAGING COMPOST LEACHATE DURING EXCESSIVE RAINFALL CONDITIONSAn Information Sheet prepared by The Composting Association in the United Kingdom gives an overview of available options for managing “liquor” (leachate) produced at composting sites - especially following the excessively rainy spring/summer of 2007. “Compost leachate” can be described as water that has changed in ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Focus on Australia & New Zealand: Composting Developments In Australia And New Zealand

     Composting Developments In Australia And New Zealand An Emerging Industry Takes Shape To deal with the waste stream in Australia and New Zealand, all strategies refer to organics recycling as a “fundamental vehicle for reaching future waste reduction targets,” notes Edmund Horan of RMIT University in Melbourne. “Composting provides a mechanism, not only for ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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