raw manure Articles

  • Cost-Benefit Analyses: Exploring the Economics of On-Farm Composting

    When exploring the merits of on-farm composting, the question most often raised is: What are the economics? How do the savings or revenues from on-farm composting compare to the costs? Of course, the answer is the ever present “it depends.” Expenses, resources, revenue opportunities, environmental constraints and circumstances vary greatly from one farm to the next. Most people would agree that ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Cayuga County, New York Pioneers Community Digester Program

    New project of Soil And Water Conservation District will help control odors and improve water quality while generating biogas with an innovative system. A bioenergy vision that started several years ago is finally being built at the Cayuga County Soil and Water Conservation District headquarters in Auburn, New York. Jim Hotaling, Executive Director, has long envisioned a community digester ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Potential pollutants from farm, food and yard waste composts at differing ages: Part I. physical and chemical properties

    There is little information about the changes in physical and chemical properties of compost as a function of compost feedstocks and age of the compost mixture. As a consequence of this gap, the potential of compost to serve as a pollutant source relative to compost age (from initial mixing of raw feedstocks to mature compost) and feedstocks (i.e. % of food, manure, bedding, leaves, etc.) during ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Vermicompost’s Role in Farming

    One of the main goals of every organic farmer is to build long-term soil fertility and tilth by feeding the soil with a variety of natural amendments. The regular addition of compost is one of the best ways to enhance the soil’s organic and humic content, which helps to build a fertile soil structure. This soil structure makes better use of water and nutrients. It is easier to till and, ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Preconsumer Collection : Composting Food Service Scraps at Resort

     Cocomposting at Pearl Harbor PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • A small plant with great success - case study

    The farm-based biogas plant operated by the Wienken family in Augustenfeld (near Löningen) is the first plant of its size built by bwe. Originally, the farm's operator had planned to install a straw heating element. However, since the input materials are available on the farm itself in their entirety, the decision to implement a biogas plant designed by bwe was obvious. One decisive aspect ...

  • Phosphorus And Compost Use Dynamics

    Organic forms of phosphorus, such as biosolids and compost products, contain low to very low levels of water extractable phosphorus, but increasingly are regulated like inorganic P sources. Phosphorus is one of the 16 essential plant nutrients, and is considered one of the three major plant nutrients (along with nitrogen and potassium). Phosphorus is not only important in root development, but ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Users Forum : Compost Research On Wisconsin Organic Farm

     Cocomposting at Pearl Harbor PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON LEVELS “One unique local characteristic (and treatment difficulty) we encountered in our composting program,” says Stan Konno, PWC environmental department director head, “is the high level of diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the sludge from the WWTF at Fort Kamehameha.” Oil from past leaks in pipelines ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Anaerobic Digest

    Boulder, Colorado: U.S. Distributed Renewables Forecast Published Navigant Research, a market research and consulting firm in Boulder, recently published the “U.S. Distributed Renewables Deployment Forecast, 2016-2025.” The report notes that deployment of distributed renewables, such as wind, solar and anaerobic digestion facilities, in the U.S. has accelerated in the last ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Cow-pattie power

    On a massive cattle feedlot located outside the town of Vegreville, Alta., the pungent odour of cow manure is masked by the sweet smell of the province’s energy future. Turning cattle dung — “brown gold,” as some call it — into green power and other valuable byproducts is a made-in-Alberta energy solution that is not only sustainable and energy efficient, but also ...


    By Himark bioGas Inc

  • Composters Build Strong Links to California Farms

    The rapidly increasing amounts of compost applied to California farms can be traced to numerous factors — better crops, fewer disease problems, greater emphasis on product quality, mandated state recycling goals, savings in disposal costs and savings in chemical inputs. And then there’s the factor of friendship, longtime personal relationships that build trust between composters and farm ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Prairie `agri-preneurs` battle megafarm waste

    Gwyn Morgan is the retired founding CEO of EnCana Corp. The revolting image of foaming green sludge washed up on a Lake Winnipeg beach in the Aug. 24 edition of Maclean's is part of, as the accompanying article states: "a putrid green mat, twice the size of PEI, and clearly visible from space ... The culprit isn't oil spills, toxic waste or even pesticides, but nutrient overloading from ...


    By Himark bioGas Inc

  • Sustainable Soil Health

    “A Nation that destroys its soil destroys itself.” – Franklin D. Roosevelt. We have learned some harsh lessons about how to treat our soil. While most of us are aware of the problems of the past, some agricultural operations in the world are not heeding those lessons. We all know that healthy soil is essential to feed the ever-increasing ...

  • Biobased Economy opportunities for North-Netherlands

    The three Northern provinces of the Netherlands could join forces to become a major producer and supplier of renewable resources for the regional production of ‘green’ chemicals, plastics and animal feed. This is one of the conclusions from research carried out by Wageningen University & Research, Greenlincs and the University of Groningen. Close collaboration with the German ...

  • Maryland’s New Composting Regulations

    After a year of comments and revisions, the Maryland Department of Environment (MDE) is scheduled to publish its new rules for permitting composting facilities this month (December) in the Maryland Register for a final 30-day comment period. Initially proposed last January, the slightly revised composting regulations are expected to take effect in early 2015, unless further changes are required. ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • What`s New - In-Vessel Composting

    IF YOU are considering some sort of enclosed vessel for composting food residuals, yard trimmings, biosolids, manure, animal mortalities or other waste streams, there is no shortage of options to consider. Domestic and international technology providers offer agitated and nonagitated enclosed systems, as well as rigid and nonrigid containment. Unlike some of the other equipment categories in ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • College Composting Program Matures

    Untitled Document To meet the need for quality compost, Berea College now processes 35 tons of food residuals each year, providing jobs for ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost science journal of advocacy and foresight

    SEVERAL months ago, I started on a journey through the pages of Compost Science, beginning with the Spring, 1960 inaugural issue. I was confident that I could whip through the articles and news items in the several hundred issues of the magazine between 1960 and 2009, and be prepared to write this article for BioCycle’s 50th Anniversary Commemorative Edition. Granted, there were interruptions, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Jatropha as Bio-Diesel

    Introduction:- Jatropha curcus L. belongs to the family Euphorbiaceae. It is believed to be a native of South America & Africa but later spread to other continents of the world by the Portuguese settlers. The Arabs have ...


  • Agricultural Residuals Drive Producer-Owned Energy

    Farmer-owned renewable energy enterprises are increasing rapidly — with alternative fuels such as biodiesel, ethanol and distiller’s grains becoming mainstream. MINNESOTA is home to 16 ethanol plants generating approximately 550 million gallons per year. Most of these new facilities are producer-owned. Many others are under construction or are in the planning process. In 2005, Minnesota farmers ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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