rice farm water saving Articles

  • High Technology that Revolutionized Farming

    How are we going to feed the growing population by 2050? How we are going to double our food supply and how will the farming be sustainable? All the answers involve farm technology. Farm technology creates the ability to grow plants that are disease resistant, to use the equipment that can target individual crops and strengthen the rice that can survive drought and flooding and literally save ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • A model to predict safe stages of development for rice field draining and field tests of the model predictions in the Arkansas grand prairie

    Due to the cost of extracting water, effective and efficient utilization of irrigation water for rice (Oryza sativa L.) is critical to rice farm profitability. The objective of this study is to predict safe stages of development for draining rice. This objective has the potential of saving rice farmers water. A computer program has been developed to predict the stage of development for draining ...

  • Can grains of the past help us weather storms of the future?

    Combining science with traditional knowledge, researchers turn to ancient rice as a source of climate resilience In May 2009, Cyclone Aila wreaked havoc in eastern India. Clocking in at speeds of over 120 kilometers per hour, Aila hit the ...


    By Ensia

  • Emissions from Crops - POST Note

    Agriculture contributes 9% of the UK’s greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions burden and 10-12% globally. Although there is a long-term declining trend from UK agriculture, the sector may account for a larger share of overall emissions in the future as other sectors reduce emissions. This POSTnote focuses on reducing GHG emissions from growing and storing arable and horticultural crops. ...


    By UK Parliament

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    “In early 2008, Saudi Arabia announced that, after being self-sufficient in wheat for over 20 years, the non-replenishable aquifer it had been pumping for irrigation was largely depleted,” writes Lester R. Brown in his new book, Plan B 4.0: Mobilizing to Save Civilization (W.W. Norton & Company). “In response, officials said they would reduce their wheat harvest by one eighth each year ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Plan B 3.0 -- A Plan of Hope

    Plan B is shaped by what is needed to save civilization, not by what may currently be considered politically feasible. Plan B does not fit within a particular discipline, sector, or set of assumptions. Implementing Plan B means undertaking several actions simultaneously, including eradicating poverty, stabilizing population, and restoring the earth’s natural systems. It also involves cutting ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Can We Prevent A Food Breakdown?

    Food & Water Security: Protecting our Most Precious Resources will be a major issue discussed at GLOBE 2014, taking place in Vancouver Canada march 26-28. This article by Lester R. Brown, reprinted here with the kind permission of the author, puts the issue of water and food security ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Can We Prevent A Food Breakdown?

    By Lester R. Brown As food supplies have tightened, a new geopolitics of food has emerged—a world in which the global competition for land and water is intensifying and each country is fending for itself. We cannot claim that we are unaware of the trends that are undermining our food supply and thus our civilization. We know what we need ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Going green in 2012: 12 steps for the developing world

    Many of us are thinking about the changes we want to make this year. For some, these changes will be financial; for others, physical or spiritual. But for all of us, there are important resolutions we can make to “green” our lives. Although this is often a subject focused on by industrialized nations, people in developing countries can also take important steps to reduce their growing ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Where Has All the Ice Gone?

    As the earth warms, glaciers and ice sheets are melting and seas are rising. Over the last century, the global average sea level rose by 17 centimeters (7 inches). This century, as waters warm and ice continues to melt, seas are projected to rise nearly 2 meters (6 feet), inundating coastal cities worldwide, such as New York, London, and Cairo. Melting sea ice, ice sheets, and mountain glaciers ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • A Decade After Asian Tsunami, New Forests Protect the Coast

    The tsunami that struck Indonesia in 2004 obliterated vast areas of Aceh province. But villagers there are using an innovative microcredit scheme to restore mangrove forests and other coastal ecosystems that will serve as a natural barrier against future killer waves and storms. On the day that the Indian Ocean tsunami hit his village a decade ago, fisherman Hajamuddin was at sea. It was ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • Growing demand for soybeans threatens Amazon rainforest

    Some 3,000 years ago, farmers in eastern China domesticated the soybean. In 1765, the first soybeans were planted in North America. Today the soybean occupies more U.S. cropland than wheat. And in Brazil, where it spread even more rapidly, the soybean is invading the Amazon rainforest. For close to two centuries after its introduction into the United States the soybean languished as a curiosity ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • The complex nature of GMOs calls for a new conversation

    An honest discussion of genetically modified organisms must move beyond narrow concepts of human health to the wider social and environmental impacts of engineered crops. The GMO debate is one from which I’ve kept a purposeful distance. For one thing, it’s an issue that has already garnered more than its fair share of attention. For another, when you consider that many ...


    By Ensia

  • How innovation is flourishing at the grassroots

    SciDev.Net reporters across the developing world describe exciting initiatives aimed at supporting innovation in local communities and remote areas. From small-scale hydro-powered electricity in Malaysia to cost-saving solar pumps in Pakistan, communities across the developing world are ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Compost science journal of advocacy and foresight

    SEVERAL months ago, I started on a journey through the pages of Compost Science, beginning with the Spring, 1960 inaugural issue. I was confident that I could whip through the articles and news items in the several hundred issues of the magazine between 1960 and 2009, and be prepared to write this article for BioCycle’s 50th Anniversary Commemorative Edition. Granted, there were interruptions, ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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