rice growing industry Articles

  • The California rice cropping system: agronomic and natural resource issues for long-term sustainability

    California rice is produced on approximately 200,000 ha mostly in the Sacramento Valley. The crop is planted in April/May and harvested in September/October. The growing season is characterized by a Mediterranean climate with negligible rainfall, high solar radiation, and relatively cold nighttime temperatures, thus yields may exceed 9 t ha−1, 20% above the US average. California is a ...


    By Springer

  • Corn stover using as a fuel in america

    In the world, US, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, South Africa, Egypt, Kenya, Ghana, Zimbabwe, and so on, many countries grow corn, Case Study of Mozambique. Mozambique's main food crops are corn, rice, sorghum and cassava, corn is the staple food of Africans across the country are producing. Both of Corn stover and Corncob can be biomass fuel like straw, Corn stover biomass fuel boiler and corncob ...


    By Zhengzhou Boiler Co., ltd

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Global Grain Stocks Drop Dangerously Low as 2012 Consumption Exceeded Production

    The world produced 2,241 million tons of grain in 2012, down 75 million tons or 3 percent from the 2011 record harvest. The drop was largely because of droughts that devastated several major crops—namely corn in the United States (the world’s largest crop) and wheat in Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, and Australia. Each of these countries also is an important exporter. Global grain ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • EMSL expands often overlooked mycotoxin testing services due to demand

    Are there Mycotoxins in your air or food? Mycotoxins can be produced by fungi growing on crops during field or storage conditions and on damp building materials. Emerging research indicates that exposure to mycotoxins may lead to a variety of health effects. Some of the more common exposures can be traced to ingestion of contaminated foods and feed. Examples of contaminated food ingredients ...


  • Organic coffee production, shade coffee, quality coffee

    Organic coffee can be considered to be passive or active. Passive organic coffee production systems are systems that do not apply any form of chemical input. Active organic coffee production systems also do not apply chemical inputs but in addition they comply with a range of other criteria needed for organic certification. Organic certification is a necessary step if the coffee is to be exported ...

  • “Assessment of resources, markets and the potential for market development in value added cassava products in West Africa.” mission report November 2005

    Introduction Growing importance of cassava In West Africa, the importance of cassava as a commodity is steadily expanding for at least 5 decades. The crop was originally a famine-reserve and rural food crop. It gained importance as food crop both for urban and rural consumers and as new cash crop for smallholders. At the moment, cassava is the main staple of ...

  • Emissions from Crops - POST Note

    Agriculture contributes 9% of the UK’s greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions burden and 10-12% globally. Although there is a long-term declining trend from UK agriculture, the sector may account for a larger share of overall emissions in the future as other sectors reduce emissions. This POSTnote focuses on reducing GHG emissions from growing and storing arable and horticultural crops. ...


    By UK Parliament

  • Compost Science & Utilization current research March 2007

    Crop Response Extractability, plant yield and toxicity thresholds for boron in compost Investigators: William F. Brinton and Eric Evans, Woods End Research Laboratory, Inc., Mt. Vernon, Maine Objectives: To determine the quantity of total and water-soluble boron in compost and other sources and their relationship to plant performance and toxicity symptoms; and to establish toxicity thresholds ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Seasteading could be the answer to sustainably feeding 9 billion people

    Self-sufficient nation states in the middle of the ocean might be our ticket to a sustainable future. Oceans cover 71 percent of Earth’s surface, yet provide less than 2 percent of the food we eat. The growing demand for seafood, however — predicted to rise to 8 percent during the next decade — from an already depleted and exhausted ocean is forcing ...


    By Ensia

  • The complex nature of GMOs calls for a new conversation

    An honest discussion of genetically modified organisms must move beyond narrow concepts of human health to the wider social and environmental impacts of engineered crops. The GMO debate is one from which I’ve kept a purposeful distance. For one thing, it’s an issue that has already garnered more than its fair share of attention. For another, when you consider that many ...


    By Ensia

  • Indian government still ‘flip flopping’ on GM trials

    In August, India’s ruling nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) stopped its legislators from accepting Monsanto sponsorship to attend a farm exhibition in the US state of Iowa. On the surface this might seem strange: attending the Farm Progress Show should be innocuous, as Monsanto routinely takes farmers, industry experts, media and MPs from various countries to visit the show and ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Going green in 2012: 12 steps for the developing world

    Many of us are thinking about the changes we want to make this year. For some, these changes will be financial; for others, physical or spiritual. But for all of us, there are important resolutions we can make to “green” our lives. Although this is often a subject focused on by industrialized nations, people in developing countries can also take important steps to reduce their growing ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • The developing world is awash in pesticides. Does it have to be?

    Herbicides, insecticides and fungicides threaten the environment and human health in many parts of the world. But research is pointing to a better approach. In today’s globalized world, it is not inconceivable that one might drink coffee from Colombia in the morning, munch cashews from Vietnam for lunch and gobble grains from Ethiopia for dinner. That we can enjoy these ...


    By Ensia

  • Creating a Sustainable Food Future: Interim Findings - A menu of solutions to sustainably feed more than 9 billion people by 2050

    The world’s agricultural system faces a great balancing act. To meet different human needs, by 2050 it must simultaneously produce far more food for a population expected to reach about 9.6 billion, provide economic opportunities for the hundreds of millions of rural poor who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, and reduce environmental impacts, including ecosystem degradation and ...

  • A New Generation of GMOs

    Is synthetic biology on its way to our farms, markets and tables? Thousands of researchers will descend on Boston this fall for an event billed as the world’s largest gathering of synthetic biologists. The field is evolving so rapidly that even scientists working in it  ...


    By Ensia

  • We’re all in this together — let’s start acting like it

    Vaccines have sparked a conversation about the need to collectively protect each other — a conversation we need to apply to environmental challenges. Ever since a small percentage of U.S. parents decided to delay or forgo vaccinating their children against diseases like measles and whooping cough — some of which have been ...


    By Ensia

  • U.S.-India: Dealing With Monsoon Failure

    The scene plays out in India. At a reception, I met the head of Indian operations for Esso (now ExxonMobil). When I asked him how business was, he said it was great. In particular, diesel sales to fuel irrigation pumps were nearly double the previous year’s level. Why? Because farmers were pumping continuously to try to save their crops. Soon after, I met an embassy staff person, an avid ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Crop gene banks are preserving the future of agriculture. But who’s preserving them?

    As climate change makes crop diversity even more important, gene banks struggle to stay afloat. During the past few years of civil war in Syria, rebel fighters have destroyed Shia mosques and Christian graves, and burned and looted Christian churches while the Islamic State group has demolished priceless artifacts in the region. Nothing seemed sacred to the disparate ...


    By Ensia

  • CRISPR is coming to agriculture — with big implications for food, farmers, consumers and nature

    Gene editing offers dramatic advances in speed, scope and scale of genetic improvement. It also offers an opportunity for more nuanced GMO governance. Very few technologies truly merit the epithet “game changer” — but a new genetic engineering tool known as CRISPR-Cas9 is one of them. Since we first developed the ability to alter the genetic material inside a plant or animal in ...


    By Ensia

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