roll-over plow Articles

  • Italian ryegrass management effects on nitrogen supply to a subsequent potato crop

    There is increasing use of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) as a green manure in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) rotations; however, effects of its management on soil N supply to the subsequent potato crop are unknown. Fertilizer N management and plow-down date for a preceding Italian ryegrass crop, ‘Lemtal’, on soil N supply to a subsequent potato crop, ‘Russet Burbank’, was determined ...

  • Economic performance of alternative tillage systems in the northern corn belt

    While no-till (NT) cropping systems can provide conservation benefits in the northern Corn Belt, adoption has been low due to concerns about potential yield reductions and economic risk. Strip-tillage (ST) systems have been proposed as an alternative that may provide many of the conservation benefits of NT while maintaining productivity and economic returns. The objectives of this study were to ...

  • Mitigation options for sediment and phosphorus loss from winter-sown arable crops

    Received for publication January 20, 2009. Sediment and P inputs to freshwaters from agriculture are a major problem in the United Kingdom (UK). This study investigated mitigation options for diffuse pollution losses from arable land. Field trials were undertaken at the hillslope scale over three winters at three UK sites with silt (Oxyaquic Hapludalf), sand (Udic Haplustept), and clay (Typic ...

  • Losing Soil

    In 1938, Walter Lowdermilk, a senior official in the Soil Conservation Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, traveled abroad to look at lands that had been cultivated for thousands of years, seeking to learn how these older civilizations had coped with soil erosion. He found that some had managed their land well, maintaining its fertility over long stretches of history, and were ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Denver international airport case study

    Denver International Airport (DIA) serves 22 commercial airlines, offering non-stop service to more than 150 destinations worldwide. In 2008, DIA handled over 51,000,000 passengers. With an airport elevation of 5,431 feet and 53 square miles of property, Denver International Airport has a historical reputation for massive snow-fall — at times, even overnight. DIA’s snow removal is ...

  • Disruptive Innovation Festival

    The Ellen MacArthur Foundation’s first-ever Distributive Innovation Festival debuts online Oct. 20. Over the course of four weeks, the DIF will provide an online space for entrepreneurs, businesses, thought leaders and learners from around the world to explore how we might shape a circular economy. DIF ...


    By Ensia

  • Las Vegas DirtWorkz, Inc.: Using the City’s wood waste to farm the desert

    Ray Becerra knows a thing or two about recycling, reusing and repurposing waste materials. You might even say it’s in his blood. Becerra has spent his entire life around landfills and farming operations, and he wears his passion for recycling waste materials on his sleeve. His enthusiasm for dust, dirt and debris, says Becerra, comes from his father, an avid recycler who was involved in the ...

  • Nutrient Management: Recycling Residuals Into Animal Feed

     Composting Reduces Fuel and Labor Costs on Family Farms Jeff and Pam Riesgraf — who manage a certified organic dairy and crop operation near Jordan, Minnesota — began composting manure from their dairy herd in 1993. They had two major objectives. First, they wanted to reduce weed seeds naturally present in manure. At the same time, they understood the need to protect water quality by ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Soil and Water Benefits: Composting Reduces Fuel and Labor Costs on Family Farms

     Composting Reduces Fuel and Labor Costs on Family Farms Jeff and Pam Riesgraf — who manage a certified organic dairy and crop operation near Jordan, Minnesota — began composting manure from their dairy herd in 1993. They had two major objectives. First, they wanted to reduce weed seeds naturally present in manure. At the same time, they understood the need to protect water quality by ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • The oil intensity of food

    Today we are an oil-based civilization, one that is totally dependent on a resource whose production will soon be falling. Since 1981, the quantity of oil extracted has exceeded new discoveries by an ever-widening margin. In 2008, the world pumped 31 billion barrels of oil but discovered fewer than 9 billion barrels of new oil. World reserves of conventional oil are in a free fall, dropping every ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Full Planet, Empty Plates: Chapter 2. The Ecology of Population Growth

    Throughout most of human existence, population growth has been so slow as to be imperceptible within a single generation. Reaching a global population of 1 billion in 1804 required the entire time since modern humans appeared on the scene. To add the second billion, it took until 1927, just over a century. Thirty-three years later, in 1960, world population reached 3 billion. Then the pace sped ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Composting Roundup - March 2018

    Sacramento, California: Alternative Manure Management Project Grants The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) awarded $9.64 million in grant funding to 17 alternative manure management projects across the state. These projects, part of the Alternative Manure Management Program, or AMMP, will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on California dairy farms and livestock ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Let’s stop treating our soil like dirt

    One of the most underappreciated resources on our planet, soil does much more than grow crops The United Nations’ International Year of Soils is hardly a media darling. Maybe it’s because many people are like me, who recall Mom’s words: “Take off your shoes! Don’t bring dirt ...


    By Ensia

  • 3 Things To Think About Before Buying Your Thanksgiving Turkey

    Thanksgiving is time for celebration of family, football, and friends, sandwiched between platters of turkey, stuffing, and pumpkin pie. But when you head out to pick up those last minute ingredients for your Thanksgiving feast, you may want to consider just how much food won’t get eaten at your table. Recent ...

  • Can We Prevent A Food Breakdown?

    Food & Water Security: Protecting our Most Precious Resources will be a major issue discussed at GLOBE 2014, taking place in Vancouver Canada march 26-28. This article by Lester R. Brown, reprinted here with the kind permission of the author, puts the issue of water and food security ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Can We Prevent A Food Breakdown?

    By Lester R. Brown As food supplies have tightened, a new geopolitics of food has emerged—a world in which the global competition for land and water is intensifying and each country is fending for itself. We cannot claim that we are unaware of the trends that are undermining our food supply and thus our civilization. We know what we need ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Agroecology can help fix our broken food system. Here’s how.

    The various incarnations of the sustainable food movement need a science with which to approach a system as complex as food and farming. This story was co-published with Food Tank, a nonprofit organization focused on building a global community for safe, healthy, nourished eaters. Thumb through U.S. newspapers any day in early 2015, and you could find stories on ...


    By Ensia

  • A Whole Lot of Turf

    You can see it on the faces of the folks who drive slowly by, their necks straining first forward, then sideways and finally back. It is a look of puzzlement and awe, the type of reaction normally reserved for some sort of alien sighting, and rarely produced by merely gazing at a parking lot. But this is no ordinary parking lot - no pavement wasteland of dirty tar. The Westfarms Mall in ...


    By Invisible Structures, Inc.

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield?

    City-based agriculture produces 15 to 20 percent of food globally. In the U.S., its benefits go far beyond nutrition. This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit investigative news organization. ...


    By Ensia

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