root vegetable harvester Articles

  • Hydroponic cultivation of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) using effluents from primary, secondary and tertiary + UV treatments

    ABSTRACTThe aim of this study was to evaluate the potential cultivation of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) with domestic wastewater effluents with different levels of treatment from a compact WWTP in Brazil. Vegetables were grown in five treatments: nutrient solution (control), secondary effluent diluted 50%, secondary effluent not diluted, tertiary effluent UV irradiated, and UASB effluent. ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Influence of phosphorus and potassium on alfalfa yield, taproot C and N pools, and transcript levels of key genes after defoliation

    Fertilization with K and P impacts alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) yield, but how these nutrients influence taproot reserves and gene expression is unknown. Our objectives were to determine how P and K impact (i) alfalfa yield and yield components, (ii) accumulation and use of taproot carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pools, and (iii) transcript levels for β-amylase, sucrose synthase, and the high ...

  • HCBD uptake into edible plant

    Client: Confidential Location: UK Services: Research and Development, Human Health Risk Assessment Summary: This research programme increased the knowledge base regarding uptake of HCBD, enabling a better understanding of exposures to this compound in the environment During discussions with the public and within ...

  • Cultivating energy crop production

    A NEW Farm Bill is moving through the Congressional legislative process. Along the way, commercial agriculture is debating the energy impacts of future corn and soybean production. The growth of corn-based ethanol and soybean-based biodiesel has created competition for the feed inputs into animal agriculture, namely corn and soybeans. While most of agriculture discusses energy production from ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Potato yield and quality response to subsoil tillage and compaction

    Compacted soils have been found in intensively cultivated vegetable crop regions of Central Wisconsin, resulting in the wide scale use of subsoil tillage by growers. The goal of this project was to assess potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) yield and quality response to soil compaction and subsoil tillage. Potato quality factors evaluated were marketable yield, tuber size distribution, internal ...

  • Integrating ecosystem services into crop protection and pest management: Case study with the soil fumigant 1,3‐dichloropropene and its use in tomato production in Italy

    Ecosystems provide the conditions for producing food, regulating water, and providing wildlife habitats; these, among others, are known as ecosystem services (ESs). Food production is both economically and culturally important to southern European farmers, particularly in Italy where farmers grow flavorsome tomatoes with passion and pride. Growers rely on pesticides for crop protection, the ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Stud case study

    A major vegetable grower in Lantokia, Fiji, using soilless culture systems began to trial Amnite A-100. His crops consisted principally of lettuce, tomatoes, capsicums, cucumbers, zucchinis and melons. Before the trials they had been plagued with root diseases, mosaic virus and insect attack, control of which required constant use of pesticides and ultraviolet lighting. The first trials commenced ...


    By Cleveland Biotech Ltd.

  • Ontario Horticulture Research Priority Report 2016

    Sector Consultation The Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association partnered with Vineland to host a research strategy workshop in November 2014 with the goal of defining the top five research priorities for each crop group. Grower organizations were invited to nominate two representatives to participate on their behalf and a number of researchers from relevant fields were invited to ...

  • Family farms can be competitive by focusing on conservation and stewardship

    While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports a 40 percent decline in U.S. cropland soil erosion rates from 1982 to 2007, recent trends appear to challenge this progress. Record prices for corn and soybeans have diverted acres out of conservation programs and encouraged intensive production on a wide scale. Tree lines are cleared and wet areas drained, turning 120-acre farms into ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Crops flourish with Scalewatcher

    Water is an essential component of horticulture and agriculture whether it is used for irrigating field-scale vegetables, nursery stock, flowers or fruit.  Where water contains high degrees of calcium, magnesium and sodium, it can cause nutrient deficiency in plants and crops resulting in stunted growth and poor yields. Calcium also blocks irrigation systems and boilers in heated ...

  • How green was my Vertical Farm?

    By 2050, 80% of the earth’s population will live in cities and 3 billion more people will need to be fed. The simple fact is we are running out of available land to grow enough food to feed them. If we can’t grow our cities outward to find more arable land, the only solution is to grow them upwards. This may change the way we design cities forever.The problem is real and immediate. Even by most ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • How three U.S. mini-farms are sowing the seeds of global food security

    Tiny, biointensive operations show smallholder farmers from around the world how they can grow far more food than conventional approaches. Her face shaded by a wide-brimmed straw hat, Olawumi Benedict is cheerfully tending to her “little babies” — kale seedlings growing in shallow wooden flats until they’re hardy enough for transplantation into soil beds. Three miles over ...


    By Ensia

  • Arsenic in irrigated paddy soils

    Natural arsenic pollution of drinking water has been reported from over 70 countries world-wide, affecting an estimated 150 million people (Ravenscroft et. al., 2008). About 50 million of these people live in Bangladesh, 30 million in India and 33 million in six other countries of south and south-east Asia. It has recently been recognised that arsenic-contaminated groundwater used for irrigation ...

  • Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield?

    City-based agriculture produces 15 to 20 percent of food globally. In the U.S., its benefits go far beyond nutrition. This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit investigative news organization. ...


    By Ensia

  • What is the Future of Horticultural Science in Africa?

    Horticulture is a labour intensive sector that is important for human wellbeing: 'agriculture supplies protein, carbohydrates and staple crops - but we would have a pretty boring life without horticulture.' Nevertheless, in many countries, faculties of agriculture and their departments of horticulture have been swallowed by schools of life or earth sciences. As a result horticulture gets ...

  • Regional roundup

    Ithaca, New YorkCOMPOSTING PET WASTE AT DOG PARKCayuga Compost and Tompkins County Dog Owners Group launched a program on Earth Day this year to collect and compost pet waste at the Ithaca Dog Park. About 5,000 bags are used to collect 1,000 pounds of dog waste every month at the park. Plastic bags were previously provided by Wegmans supermarket, and disposed of in dumpsters going to ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Can superfoods boost the planet’s health, too?

    As demand for African and Asian tree-based superfoods grows, researchers and entrepreneurs eye ways to maximize benefits for the environment. It can seem like new health food fads pop up every week — fads that often fade as quickly as they appear. Two gaining steam lately, though, may be worth a longer look: baobab and moringa. Traditional fare in parts of Africa (and for moringa, ...


    By Ensia

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