row crop producer Articles

  • Skip-row and plant population effects on sorghum grain yield

    In environments with limited rainfall, skip-row configuration (planting one or a group of rows alternated with rows not planted) under rainfed conditions may increase yield of grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] due to conservation of soil water between widely-spaced crop rows that is not accessed until late in the growing season. A field study was conducted over 10 site-years in Nebraska ...

  • Living mulch forage yield and botanical composition in a corn-soybean-forage rotation

    Managing forages as living mulches during row crop production requires suppressing the forages to produce economical crop yields. The objective of this research was to identify forage plants with varied growth habit, persistence, and yield potential to provide desirable ecosystem functions in a multifunctional cropping system. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), kura clover (Trifolium ambiguum Bieb.), ...

  • Effects of the herbicide dicamba on non‐target plants and pollinator visitation

    Nearly 80% of all pesticides applied to row crops are herbicides, and these applications pose potentially significant ecotoxicological risks to non‐target plants and associated pollinators. In response to the widespread occurrence of weed species resistant to glyphosate, biotechnology companies have developed crops resistant to the synthetic‐auxin herbicides dicamba or 2,4‐D, and once ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Tillage requirements for integrating winter-annual grazing in peanut production: plant water status and productivity

    The use of crop rotation systems involving winter-annual grazing can help peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) producers increase profitability, although winter-annual grazing could result in excessive soil compaction, which can severely limit yields. We conducted a 3-yr field study on a Dothan loamy sand in southeastern Alabama to develop a conservation tillage system for integrating peanut with ...

  • How farm policy used to work

    In the period between the 1930s and 1992, farm bills generally instituted compensation policies that took the form of price supports. These policies were designed to manage the surplus production that resulted from centuries of developmental policies while allowing U.S. farmers the chance, with hard work and good management skills, to provide their family with a livelihood. Compensation policies ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Knowledge of Farm Practices – The Key for Successful Farming

    Agriculture plays an important part in the world economy. One-third of the economically active population obtains its livelihood from agriculture. In Asia and Africa, millions of small-scale farmers, fishermen, and indigenous people produce most of the food consumed worldwide, in most cases on very small plots of land. Agriculture is increasingly called upon to address a wide range of critical ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • On site at Northdown Orchard Organic Farm

    On Saturday 15th of October we were on site with Mike and the team at Northdown Orchard, an existing customer who was kind enough to show us around the farm and let us snap some great photos at his site in exchange for a morning demonstrating our latest stone burier on his tractor. About Northdown Orchard The organic farm is a family run affair and sits on a site of ...


    By Farm Tech Supplies Ltd.

  • Soil water content and soil disaggregation by disking affects PM10 emissions

    Row crop agriculture in California's San Joaquin Valley is a major contributor of particulate matter <10 µm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10). The California Air Resources Board uses fixed PM10 emission values for various tillage operations to monitor and design attainment strategies. However, fixed emission values do not reflect emissions produced by a single implement operating under different ...

  • Influence of nonoptimal ripener applications and postharvest residue retention on sugarcane second ratoon yields

    Retention of sugarcane (interspecific hybrids of Saccharum spp.) postharvest residue and certain glyphosate ripener application regimes may independently reduce yields of the subsequent ratoon crop in wet climates. The objective of this experiment was to determine the effects of ripener application and ripener treatment to harvest intervals (THI) on yields of the treated first ratoon, and the ...

  • Improving soil nutrition with poultry litter application in low-input forage systems

    Despite high volumes of manure production in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, there are still areas of forage production that are nutrient deficient because manures have traditionally been applied to higher-value row crops. This study was conducted to compare the effects of poultry litter and inorganic fertilizers on soil fertility and forage production. Two sites had the same treatments ...

  • Global Grain Stocks Drop Dangerously Low as 2012 Consumption Exceeded Production

    The world produced 2,241 million tons of grain in 2012, down 75 million tons or 3 percent from the 2011 record harvest. The drop was largely because of droughts that devastated several major crops—namely corn in the United States (the world’s largest crop) and wheat in Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, and Australia. Each of these countries also is an important exporter. Global grain ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Compost Users Forum: The Applied Thoughts Of A Compost Theorist

    WITHIN a 60-mile radius of my office here in central California, there are 1,000 dairies — each having an average of 2,000 cows. They generate over four million tons of manure annually, so we are pretty much in the manure business whether we want to be or not. Somebody has to manage this material and help the farmers utilize it properly, fulfilling its potential monetary value. That’s what we ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Equivalency of broiler litter to ammonium nitrate as a cotton fertilizer in an upland soil

    Estimates of litter value based on crop yield equivalency to inorganic fertilization may reflect the actual value of litter more accurately than estimates based on its N, P, and K content. The primary objective of this research was to identify a rate of broiler litter that results in cotton lint yield equivalent to inorganic N fertilization and to estimate litter value based on this yield ...

  • Can We Prevent A Food Breakdown?

    By Lester R. Brown As food supplies have tightened, a new geopolitics of food has emerged—a world in which the global competition for land and water is intensifying and each country is fending for itself. We cannot claim that we are unaware of the trends that are undermining our food supply and thus our civilization. We know what we need ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Can We Prevent A Food Breakdown?

    Food & Water Security: Protecting our Most Precious Resources will be a major issue discussed at GLOBE 2014, taking place in Vancouver Canada march 26-28. This article by Lester R. Brown, reprinted here with the kind permission of the author, puts the issue of water and food security ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • How a new way of thinking about soil sparked a national movement in agriculture

    For three weeks every month, Ray Archuleta captivates audiences with a few handfuls of soil. He begins with two clumps, dropping them into water. The soil from a farm where the soil isn’t tilled holds together, while the tilled soil immediately disperses, indicating poor soil structure. Next, volunteers from the audience — mostly farmers and ranchers — pour water over a soil ...


    By Ensia

  • Understanding Compost Tea

     Understanding Compost Tea COMPOST TEA describes many different preparations made using compost as a starting material and producing a liquid extract or in some cases a “liquid version” of the original compost. There are many home-designed pieces of equipment and some commercially available equipment made to produce compost tea. New ideas abound on how to fabricate the better tea-maker and ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Commercial Experiences :Time for (compost) Tea in the Northwest

     Understanding Compost Tea COMPOST TEA describes many different preparations made using compost as a starting material and producing a liquid extract or in some cases a “liquid version” of the original compost. There are many home-designed pieces of equipment and some commercially available equipment made to produce compost tea. New ideas abound on how to fabricate the better tea-maker and ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • How three U.S. mini-farms are sowing the seeds of global food security

    Tiny, biointensive operations show smallholder farmers from around the world how they can grow far more food than conventional approaches. Her face shaded by a wide-brimmed straw hat, Olawumi Benedict is cheerfully tending to her “little babies” — kale seedlings growing in shallow wooden flats until they’re hardy enough for transplantation into soil beds. Three miles over ...


    By Ensia

  • What’s Happening to the Birds?

    Following in Rachel Carson’s footsteps, a new generation of scientists investigates a new generation of pesticides. Christy Morrissey is driving her white pickup truck along Canada’s endless prairie highway, windows open, listening for birds. She points to the scatter of ponds glinting in the landscape, nestled among fields of canola that stretch as far as the eye ...


    By Ensia

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you