saline agriculture soils Articles

  • Wastewater reuse for irrigation and seawater intrusion: evaluation of salinity effects on soils in Cyprus

    Climate change and the continuous population growth increase the demand for water, which in arid and semiarid regions, like the Mediterranean, is considered a limited resource. Future demands will not be met by traditional water resources like surface and groundwater. In order to handle increased water demand, the treated wastewater originating from municipal wastewater treatment plants is ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • The impact of climate change and soil salinity in irrigation water demand on the Gaza Strip

    The presented work analyzes the potential impacts of the temperature, precipitation changes and water salinity on agricultural water demand. The study was carried out on five representative orchard crops (olive, palm, grapes, citrus and guava) that cover around 83% of the orchard farms in Gaza Strip. To achieve this goal, CropWat modeling software version 8.0 is used to calculate the ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Regional-scale assessment of soil salinity in the Red river valley using multi-year MODIS EVI and NDVI

    Received for publication April 15, 2009. The ability to inventory and map soil salinity at regional scales remains a significant challenge to scientists concerned with the salinization of agricultural soils throughout the world. Previous attempts to use satellite or aerial imagery to assess soil salinity have found limited success in part because of the inability of methods to isolate the effects ...

  • Perceptions and practices of farmers towards the salinity problem: the case of Harran Plain, Turkey

    The Harran region, located in the South-eastern part of Turkey, is facing an increasing salinity problem due to excessive and inefficient irrigation practices. In this paper, we survey 619 cotton producers in the region and analyse their perceptions and practices towards soil salinity. The survey results indicate that formal education and training are the central factors that determine the ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Salinity-induced loss and damage to farming households in coastal Bangladesh

    Salinity intrusion in soil caused by climate-induced hazards, especially cyclones and sea level rise (SLR), is adversely affecting rice production in coastal Bangladesh. The southwest coastal district of Satkhira is one of the most vulnerable areas because of its high exposure to salinity intrusion and widespread poverty. Based on a survey of 360 farming households in four villages and on focus ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Sustainable Soil Health

    “A Nation that destroys its soil destroys itself.” – Franklin D. Roosevelt. We have learned some harsh lessons about how to treat our soil. While most of us are aware of the problems of the past, some agricultural operations in the world are not heeding those lessons. We all know that healthy soil is essential to feed the ever-increasing ...

  • Seaweed compost as an amendment for horticultural soils in Argentina

    Seaweed (fresh, dry) or its products (extracts, composts, soil conditioners) have been long used in agriculture to enhance plant growth and productivity. In this study, we evaluated the effects that seaweed composts at different doses and degree of maturation had on the yield of tomatoes (Licopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. platense) grown on a horticultural soil in northeastern Patagonia. We used ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Let’s stop treating our soil like dirt

    One of the most underappreciated resources on our planet, soil does much more than grow crops The United Nations’ International Year of Soils is hardly a media darling. Maybe it’s because many people are like me, who recall Mom’s words: “Take off your shoes! Don’t bring dirt ...


    By Ensia

  • Successful Partnerships between Agriculture and Water Utilities Highlighted in White Paper

    A white paper entitled Collaborating for Healthy Watersheds, highlighting nine successful municipal-agricultural collaborations that address water quality ...

  • Potential drawbacks associated with agricultural irrigation with treated wastewaters from desalinated water origin and possible remedies

    Over 90% of the water supplied in the coastal region in Israel in 2013 (600 Mm3 y−1) will be from desalination plants. The wastewater generated from this water (>400 Mm3 y−1) is planned, after proper treatment, to be reused for agricultural irrigation, making this low-salinity water the main agricultural-sector future water source. In this respect both the Mg2 +  concentration and the Sodium ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Nutrient acquisition and yield response of Barley exposed to salt stress under different levels of potassium nutrition

    Abstract: A greenhouse experiment was carried out in 2002 at Jordan University of Science and Technology, Agricultural Experiment Station to examine the effect of potassium fertilization on the response of barley (Hordeum vullgare L.) to different soil salinity levels. Five levels of potassium (0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 g K per pot as KCl) and two salt levels (0.75 and 13 ds/m) were ...

  • The principles of Natural Sequence Farming

    The paper outlines the four fundamental principles of Natural Sequence Farming (NSF). It explains historical changes in the Australian landscape affecting vegetation, drainage, and morphology, including the typical perched water flows. NSF management techniques are analysed as structural and non-structural and, in the opinion of the CSIRO Expert Panel, both produce manifold benefits in terms of ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Fertilization and blending alternatives for irrigation with desalinated water

    Received for publication April 29, 2008. In arid-zone agriculture where available irrigation water is saline, desalination is becoming an attractive method for increasing yields and reducing negative environmental consequences. However, irrigation with desalinated water can be problematic if essential nutrients, including Ca, Mg, and S, removed during reverse osmosis, are not reintroduced. We ...

  • Prospects of desalination for irrigation water in the Sultanate of Oman

    The most limiting factor for the agricultural sector in the Sultanate of Oman is a lack of water, and security of supply in terms of both quantity and quality. Salinization of both soils and groundwater systems along the coastal strip of Al-Batinah has placed a substantial burden on farmers regarding crop selection and, therefore, farm profitability. Desalination of brackish and seawaters ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Water Stress

    Plants experience water stress either when the water supply to their roots becomes limiting, or when the transpiration rate becomes intense. Water stress is primarily caused by a water deficit, such as a drought or high soil salinity. Each year, water stress on arable plants in different parts of the world disrupts agriculture and food supply with the final consequence: famine. Hence, the ability ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Sustainable Management of Large Scale Irrigation Systems: A Decision Support Model for Gediz Basin, Turkey

    While water on a global scale is plentiful, 97% of it is saline and 2.25% is trapped in glaciers and ice, leaving only 0.75% available in freshwater aquifers, rivers and lakes. About 70% of this fresh water is used for agricultural production, 22% for industrial purposes and 8% for domestic purposes. Increasing competition for water for domestic and industrial purposes is likely to reduce the ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Turning abandoned rice fields into mangroves

    What do you do when mangroves fail to naturally recolonise abandoned rice fields in one of the most precious mangrove deltas of the world? Pieter van Eijk reports on a recent mission to Western Africa that paves the way for large-scale mangrove recovery through a so-called ‘ecological restoration’ approach. ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Agroforestry Mitigates Climate Change

    Climate changes, as one of the biggest threats to a global food security, highly influence natural resources that are essential for crop production. Farming is not only affected by the impact of climate changes, but it’s also a significant contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions. Intensive farm practices that include both farm production and change of land use, directly affect the ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Using Compost To Control Plant Diseases

    Losses due to soilborne diseases on some greenhouse, nursery and vegetable crops can amount to thousands of dollars per acre annually. Until the 1930s, organic amendments — consisting of animal and green manures, coupled with crop rotation — were principal methods of control. But these approaches were largely abandoned for reasons of cost and inconvenience after commercial fertilizers and the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Poultry Farm Pioneers Low-Rate Composting

    Tony Pastore, Sr. started Park Farms in Canton, Ohio decades ago to process and market chickens. In 1989, it was decided that instead of buying chickens from other producers, a new venture would be launched to raise chickens directly for Park Farms. This led to the formation of A & J Farms, a 1,900-acre operation that contains 14 separately operating chicken farms. Each sub-farm has up to ten ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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