sheep building Articles

  • Common Sheep Diseases

    Sometimes, no matter what special precautions and preventative measures we take, we get sick. The food we eat, the lack of quality sleep we get, even the emotional stress we carry around with us—it all adds up. It’s just a fact of life: Sometimes, we get sick. And it’s no different for our animals, including a farmer’s sheep. But as many of your sheep that do get ...


    By Lakeland Group

  • Research highlights cattle emissions reduction opportunity

    Researchers in Denmark have measured the quantities of greenhouse gases in the breath of dairy cows and demonstrated a heritable variability between individual animals. “This means that we have an opportunity to select for breeding those individuals which will produce offspring that generate less methane,” says Dr Jan Lassen who led the research project on individual methane ...


    By Gasmet Technologies Oy

  • CH#1115 - Small Holder Piggery Problems

    Waste Type: Pig Manure Article: After 20 yrs with SAA, Mark Tutton, a qualified aircraft engineer, licenced to maintain Jumbos and having being stationed around SA and Mauritius decided to retire from the rat race. A few years before leaving he had purchased a small holding near Benoni where he bought [fattened] and sold goats & sheep. He came from a farming family, and, when he was ...


    By BIO-SYSTEMS International

  • Wholesale arable change leads to tight slug control

    "Eight years into implementing a zero-till policy across the farm, we’re seeing improved yields of 10 tonnes per hectare for our first year wheat, and five tonnes per hectare on winter beans. We’ve also noticed that we continue to see year-on-year improvements to soil structure and crop yields. “The winter beans have been extremely valuable in the rotation to ensure nitrogen and ...


    By Certis UK

  • The Ins and Outs of Cattle Nutrition

    They say, “You are what you eat.” What goes in and out of our bodies is obviously important for our general health and maintenance. Well, the same holds true for our cattle as well, but with one main difference: Where we only have one stomach to worry about, they have four! Cattle are animals technically classified as ruminants, a distinction that includes sheep, ...


    By Lakeland Group

  • When population growth and resource availability collide

    As land and water become scarce, competition for these vital resources intensifies within societies, particularly between the wealthy and those who are poor and dispossessed. The shrinkage of life-supporting resources per person that comes with population growth is threatening to drop the living standards of millions of people below the survival level, leading to potentially unmanageable social ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Learning from past civilizations

    To understand our current environmental dilemma, it helps to look at earlier civilizations that also got into environmental trouble. Our early twenty-first century civilization is not the first to face the prospect of environmentally induced economic decline. The question is how we will respond. As Jared Diamond points out in his book Collapse, some of the early societies that were in ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Full Planet, Empty Plates: Chapter 2. The Ecology of Population Growth

    Throughout most of human existence, population growth has been so slow as to be imperceptible within a single generation. Reaching a global population of 1 billion in 1804 required the entire time since modern humans appeared on the scene. To add the second billion, it took until 1927, just over a century. Thirty-three years later, in 1960, world population reached 3 billion. Then the pace sped ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • The Man Who Discovered the "Divine Materials" in Compost

    Untitled Document BioCycle July 2004, Vol. 45, No. 7, p. 58 Compost life continues bright, vigorous and upstream for Harry Hoitink, as he ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • CRISPR is coming to agriculture — with big implications for food, farmers, consumers and nature

    Gene editing offers dramatic advances in speed, scope and scale of genetic improvement. It also offers an opportunity for more nuanced GMO governance. Very few technologies truly merit the epithet “game changer” — but a new genetic engineering tool known as CRISPR-Cas9 is one of them. Since we first developed the ability to alter the genetic material inside a plant or animal in ...


    By Ensia

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