soil conservation tillage Articles

  • The impact of public policy on conservation tillage in US agriculture

    A number of policy tools are used to reduce soil erosion from agricultural lands in the USA, including education and technical assistance, financial assistance, land retirement, and conservation compliance requirements. Education and technical assistance by public and private sources can be effective in promoting the adoption of conservation tillage by farmers for whom that practice will be ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Zonejection: Conservation tillage manure nutrient delivery system

    Manure application in minimum till (MT) systems is a challenge worthy of attention because residue cover is a keystone for environmental protection. To develop a system combining zone tillage and manure application into one operation (zonejection), two experiments were conducted. In Exp. 1, liquid swine manure (LSM) was applied in fall or spring for two site years (A, B). In Exp. 2, LSM was ...

  • In-situ soil moisture conservation: utilisation and management of rainwater for crop production

    The salient results of in-situ soil water conservation technologies that have been found suitable for increasing soil moisture in the arid and semiarid lands of eastern Kenya are reviewed. The results showed that Zai pits, tumbukiza and deep tillage when used together with soil fertility improvement can increase crop yields by 4–10 times in comparison to conventionally ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Conservation: It’s the right thing to do

    A fable of six blind men and an elephant originated centuries ago somewhere on the Indian continent. In it the blind men try to identify an elephant by touching only one part. According to the fable each man came to a different conclusion as to what the elephant was. The parable illustrates that though opinions may vary, there’s some truth to be found in all of them. That’s the way it ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Fate and effects of clothianidin in fields using conservation practices

    Despite the extensive use of the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin, and its known toxicity to beneficial insects like pollinators, little attention has been given to its fate under agricultural field conditions. The present study investigated the fate and toxicity of clothianidin applied every other year as a corn seed‐coating at two different rates, i.e., 0.25 and 0.50 mg/seed, in an ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Family farms can be competitive by focusing on conservation and stewardship

    While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports a 40 percent decline in U.S. cropland soil erosion rates from 1982 to 2007, recent trends appear to challenge this progress. Record prices for corn and soybeans have diverted acres out of conservation programs and encouraged intensive production on a wide scale. Tree lines are cleared and wet areas drained, turning 120-acre farms into ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Impact of varying planting Dates and tillage systems on cotton growth and lint yield production

    As economic conditions deteriorated, cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) producers have looked to improve profit margins by reducing inputs while maintaining yields. Pairing the yield benefits from early planting with the input reductions from conservation tillage might help accomplish those goals. The objective was to determine how growth, lint yield, and fiber quality were impacted by planting ...

  • Soil water content and soil disaggregation by disking affects PM10 emissions

    Row crop agriculture in California's San Joaquin Valley is a major contributor of particulate matter <10 µm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10). The California Air Resources Board uses fixed PM10 emission values for various tillage operations to monitor and design attainment strategies. However, fixed emission values do not reflect emissions produced by a single implement operating under different ...

  • Five Ways to Manage the Soil for Planting

    The soil, as the primary resource for food production and the most important tool for every farmer, is crucial for farming. Successful farming begins with the quality soil, which provides water and essential nutrients to the crops. Rich and healthy soil, combined with the appropriate amount of water and sunlight can significantly contribute to global food production. Proper soil management ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Soil management practices for sustainable agro-ecosystems

    A doubling of the global food demand projected for the next 50 years poses a huge challenge for the sustainability of both food production and global and local environments. Today’s agricultural technologies may be increasing productivity to meet world food demand, but they may also be threatening agricultural ecosystems. For the global environment, agricultural systems provide both sources and ...


    By Springer

  • Planting trees and managing soils to sequester carbon

    As of 2007, the shrinking forests in the tropical regions were releasing 2.2 billion tons of carbon per year. Meanwhile, expanding forests in the temperate regions were absorbing 0.7 billion tons of carbon annually. On balance, a net of some 1.5 billion tons of carbon were being released into the atmosphere each year, contributing to global warming. The tropical deforestation in Asia is driven ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Soil science gains voice in the US government

    The Soil Science Society of America’s (SSSA) Science Policy Office, started in 1986 and based in Washington, DC, educates United States (US) federal government policymakers about and advocates for soil and the soil sciences. As a result, US agricultural, natural resources and environmental legislation and corresponding federal rules and regulations are more scientifically sound and appropriately ...

  • How a new way of thinking about soil sparked a national movement in agriculture

    For three weeks every month, Ray Archuleta captivates audiences with a few handfuls of soil. He begins with two clumps, dropping them into water. The soil from a farm where the soil isn’t tilled holds together, while the tilled soil immediately disperses, indicating poor soil structure. Next, volunteers from the audience — mostly farmers and ranchers — pour water over a soil ...


    By Ensia

  • Spectral Reflectance Properties of Winter Cover Crops in the Southeastern Coastal Plain

    Conservation tillage is a commonly adopted best management practice for reducing runoff and erosion, and increasing infiltration. Yet current methodologies in place to monitor conservation tillage adoption are largely inappropriate for regional or national assessments. A major goal of this study was to evaluate the spectral response properties of four alternative winter cover crops using remotely ...

  • Conflicting farmers' objectives and environmental policies: the case of a Mediterranean farm

    In dry land areas of the Mediterranean region, farmers' decisions are particularly difficult due to irregular rainfall. Yield risk, soil erosion and desertification are important problems. Decision-making behaviour of farmers is supposed to incorporate a particular concern in the adoption of strategies to decrease income variability, to conserve soil and to guarantee a comfortable level of ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Critical source area management of agricultural phosphorus: experiences, challenges and opportunities

    The concept of critical source areas of phosphorus (P) loss produced by coinciding source and transport factors has been studied since the mid 1990s. It is widely recognized that identification of such areas has led to targeting of management strategies and conservation practices that more effectively mitigate P transfers from agricultural landscapes to surface waters. Such was the purpose of P ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • A model to predict safe stages of development for rice field draining and field tests of the model predictions in the Arkansas grand prairie

    Due to the cost of extracting water, effective and efficient utilization of irrigation water for rice (Oryza sativa L.) is critical to rice farm profitability. The objective of this study is to predict safe stages of development for draining rice. This objective has the potential of saving rice farmers water. A computer program has been developed to predict the stage of development for draining ...

  • Climate Smart Agriculture: Zambia’s Strategy to Reduce Emissions

    The agricultural sector is believed to be the backbone of the Zambian economy thereby alleviating problems associated with poverty and food security. The development of the sector is viewed as one sustainable way of economic growth and ‘Eradicating Extreme Poverty and Hunger’ which is goal number one of the Millennium Development Goals (UN, 2000). The sector contributes to the growth ...


    By TractorExport

  • Making sustainable intensification work on sound evidence

    Assessing the real-world impact of new agronomic practices depends on good economic studies, says David Spielman. A new narrative is slowly taking hold of today's collective thinking about productivity, growth and poverty reduction in developing-country agriculture: the concept of ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Knowledge of Farm Practices – The Key for Successful Farming

    Agriculture plays an important part in the world economy. One-third of the economically active population obtains its livelihood from agriculture. In Asia and Africa, millions of small-scale farmers, fishermen, and indigenous people produce most of the food consumed worldwide, in most cases on very small plots of land. Agriculture is increasingly called upon to address a wide range of critical ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

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