soil organic matter monitoring Articles

  • Effects of wastewater irrigation on soil properties and turfgrass growth

    Reuse of treated wastewater for turf irrigation is often viewed as one way to maximize existing urban water resources. The aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of treated wastewater for turfgrass and assess the effects of continuous use of treated water on the soil and crop. Two turfgrass plots irrigated with drinking water and treated wastewater were monitored over a two-year ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Relationship between distribution uniformity and soil moisture content

    Tests on a sand-based green suggest that soil moisture measurements and hand watering are critical to mitigating localized dry spot. Providing a putting surface with uniform playing conditions and aesthetics is a critical component to successful golf course management. A condition that regularly disrupts putting green uniformity is localized drying or localized dry spot (also known as LDS) (3). A ...

  • Ordinances To Amend Soils Boost Compost Demand

    Municipalities everywhere are realizing that some of the environmental issues they are grappling with locally may be mitigated by healthier soils. In the late 1990s, when Puget Sound Chinook salmon was listed as threatened, Washington State officials scrambled to find ways to improve water quality in the Puget Sound and protect spawning streams. They identified a number of methods to reduce ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Planting trees and managing soils to sequester carbon

    As of 2007, the shrinking forests in the tropical regions were releasing 2.2 billion tons of carbon per year. Meanwhile, expanding forests in the temperate regions were absorbing 0.7 billion tons of carbon annually. On balance, a net of some 1.5 billion tons of carbon were being released into the atmosphere each year, contributing to global warming. The tropical deforestation in Asia is driven ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Effects of biowaste compost amendment on soil microbial biomass and specific carbon turnover in agricultural soils

    The importance of biowaste compost as organic fertilisers has become more emergent in the last years due to the increased production of compost produced from biowaste. The utilisation of organic fertilisers in agriculture improves the physical, chemical and microbial properties of soils (Allievi et al., 1993; Senesi, 1989). Amendment of compost affects several soil properties positively like e.g. ...


    By ORBIT e.V.

  • Gene transcription in lactarius quietus-quercus petraea ectomycorrhizas from a forest soil

    Extracting fungal mRNA from ectomycorrhizas (ECMs) and forest soil samples for monitoring in situ metabolic activities is a significant challenge when studying the role of ECMs in biogeochemical cycles. A robust, simple, rapid, and effective method was developed for extracting RNA from rhizospheric soil and ECMs by adapting previous grinding and lysis methods. The quality and yield of the ...

  • Monitoring greenhouse gases from biofuel crops

    Global issues such as climate change and energy security have driven rapid growth in renewable energy production - wind, solar, tidal, geothermal, hydro, biofuels etc. However, logically, each of these methods should deliver a net benefit in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, so researchers in the United States have employed portable FTIR analysers to study the GHG emissions of biomass ...


    By Gasmet Technologies Oy

  • Compost stability: a comparative evaluation of respirometric techniques

    The new Paradigm in waste management promotes attitudes and processes that conserve resources and reduce pollution. Under this philosophy, organic waste is increasingly recognised as a recyclable material, a useful resource, making composting one of the key elements of modern waste management. As the composting industry is expanding rapidly there is a growing need for a simple, fast, relatively ...


    By ORBIT e.V.

  • Compost Users Forum: The Applied Thoughts Of A Compost Theorist

    WITHIN a 60-mile radius of my office here in central California, there are 1,000 dairies — each having an average of 2,000 cows. They generate over four million tons of manure annually, so we are pretty much in the manure business whether we want to be or not. Somebody has to manage this material and help the farmers utilize it properly, fulfilling its potential monetary value. That’s what we ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Assessing the promotion of urine-diverting dry toilets through school-based demonstration facilities in Kalisizo, Uganda

    Urine-diverting dry toilets (UDDTs) are designed to recover nutrients and organic matter from human excreta for agricultural reuse. Their wider implementation could help address problems in areas where water scarcity limits coverage of sanitation systems and declining soil fertility jeopardizes nutritional security. Demonstration facilities can improve stakeholders’ views of UDDTs; however, it ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Pesticide runoff from greenhouse production

    A research has been undertaken studying pesticide residues in water from greenhouses and the use of soils and filter materials to reduce such losses. The pesticides detected in water samples collected downstream greenhouses include 9 fungicides, 5 herbicides and 4 insecticides. 10 compounds from flower and vegetable productions were frequently found to exceed environmental risk levels, and with a ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • The response of phytoplankton and microlayer-adapted bacteria to monolayer application in a humic, eutrophic irrigation dam

    Repeat applications of artificial monolayers to farm irrigation dams to reduce evaporative loss may adversely affect water quality by enhancing populations of microlayer-adapted bacteria and blue-green algae. The microlayer, subsurface and water column of a 16 ha dam were monitored every two weeks for 18 months, to benchmark the seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton and microlayer-adapted ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Emissions from Crops - POST Note

    Agriculture contributes 9% of the UK’s greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions burden and 10-12% globally. Although there is a long-term declining trend from UK agriculture, the sector may account for a larger share of overall emissions in the future as other sectors reduce emissions. This POSTnote focuses on reducing GHG emissions from growing and storing arable and horticultural crops. ...


    By UK Parliament

  • Using Compost To Control Plant Diseases

    Losses due to soilborne diseases on some greenhouse, nursery and vegetable crops can amount to thousands of dollars per acre annually. Until the 1930s, organic amendments — consisting of animal and green manures, coupled with crop rotation — were principal methods of control. But these approaches were largely abandoned for reasons of cost and inconvenience after commercial fertilizers and the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Wholesale arable change leads to tight slug control

    "Eight years into implementing a zero-till policy across the farm, we’re seeing improved yields of 10 tonnes per hectare for our first year wheat, and five tonnes per hectare on winter beans. We’ve also noticed that we continue to see year-on-year improvements to soil structure and crop yields. “The winter beans have been extremely valuable in the rotation to ensure nitrogen and ...


    By Certis UK

  • Composting Hits Home Runs Across Canada

    Untitled Document ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Building a Safe Pesticides Industry with Bioproducts and Biomethods

    Three publications on my desk are the motivating factors behind this issue’s Compost Users Forum. The first is our own Compost Science & Utilization (Summer, l999), a journal that reports research throughout the world dealing with the process and product of compost making. The initial report in this issue is titled: “Prospects for Composts and Biocontrol Agents as Substitutes for Methyl ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Knowledge of Farm Practices – The Key for Successful Farming

    Agriculture plays an important part in the world economy. One-third of the economically active population obtains its livelihood from agriculture. In Asia and Africa, millions of small-scale farmers, fishermen, and indigenous people produce most of the food consumed worldwide, in most cases on very small plots of land. Agriculture is increasingly called upon to address a wide range of critical ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Focus on Australia & New Zealand: Composting Developments In Australia And New Zealand

     Composting Developments In Australia And New Zealand An Emerging Industry Takes Shape To deal with the waste stream in Australia and New Zealand, all strategies refer to organics recycling as a “fundamental vehicle for reaching future waste reduction targets,” notes Edmund Horan of RMIT University in Melbourne. “Composting provides a mechanism, not only for ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Analysis of Selected Herbicides And Related Metabolites in a Coastal Lagoon Under The Influence of Water Runoff: Sediment and Biota

    Coastal lagoons are subjected to strong anthropogenic pressures as a consequence of their location between Land and Sea. Among other contaminants, they are receiving high nutrient loadings and pesticides, mainly of agricultural origin, from heavily exploited watersheds. Since the number of chemicals released into the water systems is high, there is a need to classify them and the associated risk, ...


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