soybean harvesting Articles

  • A review of the phosphorus content of dry cereal and legume crops of the world

    When food scarcity increases, instability in society increases. The majority of food consumed is from cereals and legumes. Phosphorus is essential for crop plant growth and soils are depleted as this element is removed from crop lands with harvested grains/seeds. To sustain yields, inputs of nutrients are required to balance losses. On global and continental/regional bases, we assembled nine ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Cultivating energy crop production

    A NEW Farm Bill is moving through the Congressional legislative process. Along the way, commercial agriculture is debating the energy impacts of future corn and soybean production. The growth of corn-based ethanol and soybean-based biodiesel has created competition for the feed inputs into animal agriculture, namely corn and soybeans. While most of agriculture discusses energy production from ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Relationships between immobilized Phosphorus uptake in two grain legumes and soil bioactive Phosphorus pools in fertilized and manure-amended soil

    Mixing P-immobilizing additives with manure has raised concerns of irreversible reduction in P availability to growing crops. A potted plant growth experiment was conducted to characterize cattle manure P mineralization as modified by iron amendments and uptake by pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan L. Millsp.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. Triple superphosphate, untreated, or manure amended with ...

  • High-Yielding corn response to applied Phosphorus, Potassium, and Sulfur in Nebraska

    Nutrient management recommendations may change as yield levels and efficiency of crop production increase. Recommendations for P, K, and S were evaluated using results from 34 irrigated corn (Zea mays L.) trials conducted in diverse situations across Nebraska. The mean yield was 14.7 Mg ha–1 with adequate fertilizer applied. The median harvest index values were 0.52, 0.89, 0.15, and 0.56 for ...

  • Global Grain Stocks Drop Dangerously Low as 2012 Consumption Exceeded Production

    The world produced 2,241 million tons of grain in 2012, down 75 million tons or 3 percent from the 2011 record harvest. The drop was largely because of droughts that devastated several major crops—namely corn in the United States (the world’s largest crop) and wheat in Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, and Australia. Each of these countries also is an important exporter. Global grain ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Family farms can be competitive by focusing on conservation and stewardship

    While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports a 40 percent decline in U.S. cropland soil erosion rates from 1982 to 2007, recent trends appear to challenge this progress. Record prices for corn and soybeans have diverted acres out of conservation programs and encouraged intensive production on a wide scale. Tree lines are cleared and wet areas drained, turning 120-acre farms into ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Cropland management techniques for carbon storage

    The Kyoto protocol of 1997 recognises cropland management as a carbon sequestration strategy which may help to mitigate climate change. Under the protocol, ratified by the EU in 2002, member states are obliged to reduce the sum of their emissions of greenhouse gases to 5 per cent below their 1990 levels. Appropriate cropland management may help member countries meet the overall EU emissions ...

  • Many Countries Reaching Diminishing Returns in Fertilizer Use

    When German chemist Justus von Liebig demonstrated in 1847 that the major nutrients that plants removed from the soil could be applied in mineral form, he set the stage for the development of the fertilizer industry and a huge jump in world food production a century later. Growth in food production during the nineteenth century came primarily from expanding cultivated area. It was not until the ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Rethinking food production for a world of eight billion

    The World Food Programme and the Chinese government jointlyannounced that food aid shipments to China would stop at the end of theyear. For a country where a generation ago hundreds of millions of peoplewere chronically hungry, this was a landmark achievement. Not only hasChina ended its dependence on food aid, but almost overnight it has becomethe world’s third largest food aid donor. The key to ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • A hotter planet means less on our plates

    In the Sunday November 22, 2009 issue of Outlook in the Washington Post, Lester Brown discusses the significant implications of food security in the upcoming Copenhagen Conference. As the U.N. climate-change conference in Copenhagen approaches, we are in a race between political tipping points and natural ones. Can we cut carbon emissions fast enough to keep the melting of the Greenland ice ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Say it ain’t so, Joe!

    As the 2013 corn crop was being planted, futures prices were above $6.00 a bushel with an occasional bump above $7.00. Traders were concerned that the planting problems farmers were experiencing would result in reduced production. By the end of July, with fewer concerns about the size of the corn crop, the priced dropped below $5.00. Since then the price has trended downward so that as this ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Convert Agriculture Waste Into Energy

    India is mainly an agricultural county and is also the largest contributors in the GDP of the country. Agriculture provides employment to a huge population of the rural India. This was not the case suddenly post-independence in India. Various steps were taken to make India as a reliable agricultural country. Steps such as green revolution were taken in several five years plan. This has made India ...


    By Jay Khodiyar Machine Tools

  • The developing world is awash in pesticides. Does it have to be?

    Herbicides, insecticides and fungicides threaten the environment and human health in many parts of the world. But research is pointing to a better approach. In today’s globalized world, it is not inconceivable that one might drink coffee from Colombia in the morning, munch cashews from Vietnam for lunch and gobble grains from Ethiopia for dinner. That we can enjoy these ...


    By Ensia

  • Redefining ag-wastes as coproducts

    Alan Doering doesn’t have the word “waste” in his vocabulary. As the scientist heading up the Agricultural Utilization Research Institute’s (AURI) coproduct utilization program, Doering sees crop residue, agricultural processing leftovers and biomass as products with value worth exploring. “Every leftover or coproduct has a value,” Doering says. “Our goal is to find the best use with the highest ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • What makes farmers try new practices?

    Change is never easy. But when it comes to adopting new agricultural practices, some farmers are easier to convince than others. A group of researchers at the University of Illinois wanted to know which farmers are most likely to adopt multifunctional perennial cropping systems -- trees, shrubs, or grasses that simultaneously benefit the environment and generate high-value products ...


    By ScienceDaily

  • Heat and Drought Ravage U.S. Crop Prospects—Global Stocks Suffer

    September estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) show 2012 U.S. corn yields at 123 bushels per acre, down by a fourth from the 2009 high of 165 bushels per acre. Yields are the lowest since 1995 and well below the average of the last 30 years. The summer heat and drought also hit U.S. soybean yields, which are down 20 ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Book Byte: We Can Reforest the Earth

    Protecting the 10 billion acres of remaining forests on earth and replanting many of those already lost are both essential for restoring the earth’s health. Since 2000, the earth’s forest cover has shrunk by 13 million acres each year, with annual losses of 32 million acres far exceeding the regrowth of 19 ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Food security faces growing pest advance

    Coming soon to a farm near you: just about every possible type of pest that could take advantage of the ripening harvest in the nearby fields. By 2050, according to new research in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography, those opportunistic viruses, bacteria, fungi, blights, ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Overfishing Threatens Critical Link in the Food Chain

    The fish near the bottom of the aquatic food chain are often overlooked, but they are vital to healthy oceans and estuaries. Collectively known as forage fish, these species—including sardines, anchovies, herrings, and shrimp-like crustaceans called krill—feed on plankton and become food themselves for larger fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Historically, people have eaten ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

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