spawning product Articles

  • Singapore: red Tilapia spawns profits

    At this research and commercial farm, freshwater red tilapia (Oreochromis , spp.) is a major product, selling live for a premium price. Harvest size is 600 to 700 grams each, following a six month grow-out period. The senior manager reported, 'Operation with AIRE-O2® aerators is quite good and reliable. We are able to sustain good densities of fish in the ponds.' The deputy manager also reported ...

  • Piedmont Biofuels Spawns Ecoindustrial Park

    DRIVE to the end of Lorax Lane in Pittsboro, North Carolina, and you will discover a slice of the future of America. In one location, you can find - among other things -a biofuels station, a sustainable farm, a hydroponic greenhouse, a vermicomposting operation, an organic food distributor, a natural bug repellant manufacturer and a bookkeeper. And it all started with Piedmont Biofuels Industrial ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Organic and conventional production systems in the wisconsin integrated cropping systems trials: i. Productivity 1990–2002

    During the last half-century, agriculture in the upper U.S. Midwest has changed from limited-input, integrated grain–livestock systems to primarily high-input specialized livestock or grain systems. This trend has spawned a debate regarding which cropping systems are more sustainable and led to the question: can diverse, low-input cropping systems (organic systems) be as productive as ...

  • Development of Indonesian Fish Farming & Aquaculture Production

    Part 1.Fish Farms Market Overview in Indonesia Part 2.Reasons Why Fishery Industry Develops Fast in Indonesia Part 3.Fish Farm Types in Indonesian Part 4.Sustainable Development of the Fishery in Indonesia Fish Farms Market Overview in Indonesia Fish farming is the ...

  • Fathead Minnow response to broad‐range exposure of β‐sitosterol concentrations during life cycle testing

    β‐sitosterol concentration in pulp and paper mill effluents is typically greater than other phytosterols, and has been shown to cause a variety of effects in fish. We exposed Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas) to low (22 ± 0.93 µg/L), medium‐low (70 ± 2.1µg/L), medium‐high (237 ± 5.5 µg/L), and high (745 ± 16.2 µg/L) concentrations of β‐sitosterol; and a negative (water), positive (ethynyl ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Growth of new technology-based industries in India, the contrasting experiences of Biotechnology and Information Technology industries

    IT and BT are slowly but steadily emerging as important contributors to India's GDP and hence economic growth. The industries are concentrated only in a narrow geographic region and employ only a small number of highly skilled personnel. There is a feeling that the growth of these industries is also spawning increased brain drain from the country, although the evidence on this issue is not very ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Fish farming at Kontiolahti

    At Kontiolahti Fish farm the cuttings of salmon, trout and rainbow trout are cultivated to juveniles. Spawn is hatched and the juveniles of 0+ age-class are farmed inside. The older juveniles are farmed outside in surface basins. The water flow is 100-170 l/s depending on the season. Situation in the beginning The oxygen rate of the becoming water to the farm was not enough time to time, ...


    By W-Rix Ltd

  • CORNucopia of Opportunity in the Heartland: Or Just More Feed for the Political Cattle?

    We now live in a carbon constrained world. Fears of human induced climate change are bringing about changes in government, corporate and consumer behaviors. Investments in renewable energy are increasing, corporations are greening everything from their supply chain to their vehicle fleet, and consumers are seeking to minimize their ecologic footprint as well. Are some of our greening efforts ...


    By AHC Group

  • Waste not in Asheville

    Asheville, North Carolina, has gained a national reputation as a hub of local and artisanal foods. In fact, the local foods movement in this Southern Appalachian city has become so embedded in the community consciousness that the city has dubbed itself “the world’s first Foodtopian Society.” There are hundreds of unique restaurants, dozens of bakeries, breweries and ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Prairie `agri-preneurs` battle megafarm waste

    Gwyn Morgan is the retired founding CEO of EnCana Corp. The revolting image of foaming green sludge washed up on a Lake Winnipeg beach in the Aug. 24 edition of Maclean's is part of, as the accompanying article states: "a putrid green mat, twice the size of PEI, and clearly visible from space ... The culprit isn't oil spills, toxic waste or even pesticides, but nutrient overloading from ...


    By Himark bioGas Inc

  • Release of the 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species reveals ongoing decline of the status of plants and animals

    The number of known threatened species reaches 16,119. The ranks of those facing extinction are joined by familiar species like the polar bear, hippopotamus and desert gazelles; together with ocean sharks, freshwater fish and Mediterranean flowers. Positive action has helped the white-tailed eagle and offers a glimmer of hope to Indian vultures. Geneva, Switzerland, 2 May 2006 (IUCN) – The ...

  • Expanding marine protected areas to restore fisheries

    After World War II, accelerating population growth and steadily rising incomes drove the demand for seafood upward at a record pace. At the same time, advances in fishing technologies, including huge refrigerated processing ships that enabled trawlers to exploit distant oceans, enabled fishers to respond to the growing world demand. In response, the oceanic fish catch climbed from 19 million tons ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Analysis of Selected Herbicides And Related Metabolites in a Coastal Lagoon Under The Influence of Water Runoff: Water Column

    Anthropogenic release of chemical contaminants, in particular pesticides coming from agricultural areas, significantly impacts European aquatic ecosystems. Pesticides and herbicides used in common agricultural practices, are applied only during specific periods of the year, leading to significant seasonal peak concentrations in fresh and coastal waters, particularly in spring after heavy rainfall ...


  • In the age of disruptive innovation, adaptability is what matters most

    We live in a period of staggering technological change. While society is being transformed by disruptive innovation during this transition, it will be your own individual adaptability that will determine if you are a winner or a loser. Every 24 hours, there are approximately 4 million smartphones sold, 8 billion hits on YouTube, 700 million tweets, 130 million Instagram uploads, and over 200 ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Composting Organics In Canada

    Organic waste diversion is spreading steadily across Canada, with greater tonnages being collected through residential curbside pick ups and depots, as well as from food processors and others in the industrial, commercial and institutional sectors. At the federal level, Canada’s government has a small presence in organics diversion and composting. It offers occasional financial support, as ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Site Comes Back From the Brink

    The largest composter in the state of Washington, Cedar Grove Compost Company in Seattle, had its hands full of challenges in 1997 — confronted with a half million dollar fine, a lawsuit, and angry neighbors. With the adoption of an Environmental Management System (EMS), the compost facility has turned its precarious situation around and stayed in business, while dramatically cutting odor ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • If Our Planet Had a Say, Here’s Where Future Roads Would Go

    A new global ‘roadmap’ shows where to put roads for maximum benefit and least cost to the Earth. “The best thing you could do for the Amazon is to blow up all the roads.” These might sound like the words of an eco-terrorist, but it’s actually a direct quote from ...


    By Ensia

  • Old and new knowledge combine to protect Fiji`s fish

    Efforts to protect precious marine biodiversity by combining science and local knowledge are difficult but can work, reports Naomi Antony. Along the coastline of Fiji, threatened fishing communities have been combining the ancient and the new in their fight to conserve precious marine resources. Together with traditions remembered from centuries ago and community approaches ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

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