spring tillage Articles

  • Zonejection: Conservation tillage manure nutrient delivery system

    Manure application in minimum till (MT) systems is a challenge worthy of attention because residue cover is a keystone for environmental protection. To develop a system combining zone tillage and manure application into one operation (zonejection), two experiments were conducted. In Exp. 1, liquid swine manure (LSM) was applied in fall or spring for two site years (A, B). In Exp. 2, LSM was ...

  • Emergence of polymer-coated corn and soybean influenced by tillage and sowing date

    No tillage often delays soil warming and drying, thus sowing too early in the spring may compromise seed viability due to prolonged exposure to cold and wet soil in the northern Corn Belt. Coating seed with a temperature-activated polymer may circumvent the adverse effects of exposing seeds to cold and wet soil. Germination and emergence of noncoated and polymer-coated corn (Zea mays L.) and ...

  • Wheat grain quality response to tillage and rotation with field Pea

    Preceding spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with field pea (Pisum sativum L.) can enhance wheat grain yield in a wheat-pea (WP) rotation compared with continuous wheat (WW). The pea-rotation benefits to wheat grain quality are uncertain. A 6-yr study was conducted to determine (i) if grain protein content, kernel weight, and test weight were enhanced for wheat in a WP rotation compared with WW, ...

  • Tillage effects on water use and grain yield of winter wheat and green pea in rotation

    Under water-limited conditions, increasing water use efficiency (WUE) is essential for successful crop production. A 7-yr study (1977–1982, and 1985) to evaluate tillage and tillage timing effects on soil water storage, crop water use, and grain yield of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and spring green pea (Pisum sativum L.) in rotation, was conducted near Pendleton, OR. Treatments included ...

  • Near-saturated hydraulic properties in the surface layer of a sandy loam soil under conventional and reduced tillage

    Information on the quantitative tillage effects on pore space and near-saturated hydraulic characteristics is important to improve decision support systems for soil and environmental management. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of conventional (CT) and reduced tillage (RT) on water retention and infiltration properties of an Agrudalf sandy loam surface soil under long-term ...

  • Control of cereal rye with a roller/crimper as influenced by cover crop phenology

    Adoption of reduced tillage practices have been driven by the need to enhance soil quality, minimize field labor time, and scale up farm size. However, concerns about increased reliance on herbicides and demand for organically grown foods call for adoption of production practices that can reduce both tillage and herbicide use. This research study assessed the influence of planting and termination ...

  • Integrating winter annual forages into a no-till corn silage system

    The benefits of cover crops within crop rotations are well documented, but information is limited on using cover crops for forage within midwestern United States cropping systems, especially under no-tillage management. Our objective was to evaluate plant, animal, and soil responses when integrating winter cover crop forages into no-till corn (Zea mays L.) silage production. Three cover crop ...

  • Conservation: It’s the right thing to do

    A fable of six blind men and an elephant originated centuries ago somewhere on the Indian continent. In it the blind men try to identify an elephant by touching only one part. According to the fable each man came to a different conclusion as to what the elephant was. The parable illustrates that though opinions may vary, there’s some truth to be found in all of them. That’s the way it ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Family farms can be competitive by focusing on conservation and stewardship

    While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports a 40 percent decline in U.S. cropland soil erosion rates from 1982 to 2007, recent trends appear to challenge this progress. Record prices for corn and soybeans have diverted acres out of conservation programs and encouraged intensive production on a wide scale. Tree lines are cleared and wet areas drained, turning 120-acre farms into ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Wholesale arable change leads to tight slug control

    "Eight years into implementing a zero-till policy across the farm, we’re seeing improved yields of 10 tonnes per hectare for our first year wheat, and five tonnes per hectare on winter beans. We’ve also noticed that we continue to see year-on-year improvements to soil structure and crop yields. “The winter beans have been extremely valuable in the rotation to ensure nitrogen and ...


    By Certis UK

  • Redefining ag-wastes as coproducts

    Alan Doering doesn’t have the word “waste” in his vocabulary. As the scientist heading up the Agricultural Utilization Research Institute’s (AURI) coproduct utilization program, Doering sees crop residue, agricultural processing leftovers and biomass as products with value worth exploring. “Every leftover or coproduct has a value,” Doering says. “Our goal is to find the best use with the highest ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Biocycle World

    OPTIONS FOR MANAGING COMPOST LEACHATE DURING EXCESSIVE RAINFALL CONDITIONSAn Information Sheet prepared by The Composting Association in the United Kingdom gives an overview of available options for managing “liquor” (leachate) produced at composting sites - especially following the excessively rainy spring/summer of 2007. “Compost leachate” can be described as water that has changed in ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Composting Livestock Mortalities

    Performance, composting methods, environmental impacts and biosecurity of the process are evaluated for emergency disposal of cattle by research team at Iowa State University. A THREE-YEAR study was commissioned by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources to evaluate the practical feasibility, performance, environmental impacts and biosecurity of using composting for emergency disposal - should a ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

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