sustainable horticulture Articles

  • What is the Future of Horticultural Science in Africa?

    Horticulture is a labour intensive sector that is important for human wellbeing: 'agriculture supplies protein, carbohydrates and staple crops - but we would have a pretty boring life without horticulture.' Nevertheless, in many countries, faculties of agriculture and their departments of horticulture have been swallowed by schools of life or earth sciences. As a result horticulture gets ...

  • Ontario Horticulture Research Priority Report 2016

    Sector Consultation The Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association partnered with Vineland to host a research strategy workshop in November 2014 with the goal of defining the top five research priorities for each crop group. Grower organizations were invited to nominate two representatives to participate on their behalf and a number of researchers from relevant fields were invited to ...

  • Coco peat (Coir pith, coir fiber peat) is an Environmentally Sustainable Product for the Horticultural & Agricultural sector

    Coconut fiber usage has become very common among professionals in various industries due to the versatility of the product. In the horticultural, agricultural, or erosion control sector, coir has a remarkable reputation for its superiority to other available natural materials in the market. Coir fiber is found between the husk & the outer shell of a coconut husk. The individual fiber cells ...


    By CoirGreen

  • Is Horticultural Science in Crisis? What is Needed to Assure Its Future?

    "Kenya has a shortage of competent horticultural staff at institutional and commercial levels." "Horticulture is facing a crisis in the United Kingdom." "Is horticulture a withering field in the USA?" "Concerns over shortage of agriculture graduates In Australia." "Uganda's flower sector faces an imminent shortage of qualified managers and supervisors in flower ...

  • Are horticultural exports a replicable success story? Evidence from Kenya and Côte d.Ivoire

    Abstract Kenyan horticultural exports are often cited as a success story in African agriculture. Fruit and vegetable exports from Côte d’Ivoire have received less attention, but the export value is similar to that of Kenya. This paper focuses on three questions. First, do the horticultural sectors of Kenya and Côte d’Ivoire constitute valid success stories? Second, ...

  • Using coir as a growing susbstrate - sustainably and ethically

    Manufactured from the inner husk of coconuts, coir is, but its very nature, produced in distant, and often developing, countries. This means that there is also an ethical slant to consider, as well as the question of shipping costs and carbon use. As retailers apply more pressure on their suppliers to focus on sustainability and ethics, these points are becoming increasingly important. Growers ...


    By Botanicoir Ltd

  • Gardens by the Bay: High performance through design optimization and integration

    This is a case study on the development of the Gardens by the Bay, Bay South and Conservatory Complex to provide intelligent and integrated building responses. This article demonstrates the effectiveness of combining a number of environmental design and building services optimization steps to achieve a sustainable design. Key initiatives undertaken include high-level daylighting design of the ...

  • CoirGreen™ : Helping you think and act green

    Many of us depend heavily on the environment to make a living. Yet, knowingly or unknowingly to us, our actions can have negative impact on the environment, such as ...


    By CoirGreen

  • Can LED Time Travel – How Vertical Farming And LED Grow Lights Can Pave The Way To Food Security

    LED and time travel, what does that mean? In the world of plant science, it translates to productivity and references LED Grow Light’s performance levels. These amazing lights manufactured by Veggie Fresh LED are made with tiny chips called LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes) and they grow plants indoors. Of course they don’t actually travel through ...


    By Veggie Fresh LED

  • River Erosion

    With extensive frontage along the banks of the River Thames, the grounds of the world famous Henley Management College are much used by students and visitors alike. But when wave action and signal crayfish burrowing undermined a quarter of a mile of the riverbank revetments to the point where the lawns were being undercut by deep water-filled caverns, urgent remedial action was required. The ...


    By BritishFlora

  • The environment is our lifeblood at CoirGreen

    We live in a time when the insufferable arrogance of man has laid waste to the most beautiful planet in the solar system. The current statistics regarding the Earth’s environment portray a scary picture. The world’s rain forests could completely vanish in a hundred years at the ...


    By CoirGreen

  • Crop protection 2.0: reducing environmental impact in the EU Is it feasible?

    By 2023 all EU member states must be complying with more stringent guidelines related to Integrated Pest Management (IPM). “The essence of the new guideline is reducing the environmental impact of pesticides,” says Piet Boonekamp, manager of the Bio-interactions and Plant Health business unit at Wageningen UR. “In principle this European goal can be achieved, as has been shown ...

  • Building a Safe Pesticides Industry with Bioproducts and Biomethods

    Three publications on my desk are the motivating factors behind this issue’s Compost Users Forum. The first is our own Compost Science & Utilization (Summer, l999), a journal that reports research throughout the world dealing with the process and product of compost making. The initial report in this issue is titled: “Prospects for Composts and Biocontrol Agents as Substitutes for Methyl ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Compost Utilization goes Through the Roof

    Untitled Document Center for Green Roof Research at Penn State University uses compost in its media studies and plans to explore microbial communities. AT the Penn State ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Focus on Australia & New Zealand: Composting Developments In Australia And New Zealand

     Composting Developments In Australia And New Zealand An Emerging Industry Takes Shape To deal with the waste stream in Australia and New Zealand, all strategies refer to organics recycling as a “fundamental vehicle for reaching future waste reduction targets,” notes Edmund Horan of RMIT University in Melbourne. “Composting provides a mechanism, not only for ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Emissions from Crops - POST Note

    Agriculture contributes 9% of the UK’s greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions burden and 10-12% globally. Although there is a long-term declining trend from UK agriculture, the sector may account for a larger share of overall emissions in the future as other sectors reduce emissions. This POSTnote focuses on reducing GHG emissions from growing and storing arable and horticultural crops. ...


    By UK Parliament

  • Towards climate-responsible peatlands management

    Peatlands are lands with a naturally accumulated peat layer at their surface. They are found all over the world and come in many forms, display many different characteristics and are used in many different ways. Even though peatlands extend over a relatively small portion of the earth’s land surface, they hold a large pool of carbon. There is no universal definition of peatlands. For the ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Using Compost To Control Plant Diseases

    Losses due to soilborne diseases on some greenhouse, nursery and vegetable crops can amount to thousands of dollars per acre annually. Until the 1930s, organic amendments — consisting of animal and green manures, coupled with crop rotation — were principal methods of control. But these approaches were largely abandoned for reasons of cost and inconvenience after commercial fertilizers and the ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Cost-Benefit Analyses: Exploring the Economics of On-Farm Composting

    When exploring the merits of on-farm composting, the question most often raised is: What are the economics? How do the savings or revenues from on-farm composting compare to the costs? Of course, the answer is the ever present “it depends.” Expenses, resources, revenue opportunities, environmental constraints and circumstances vary greatly from one farm to the next. Most people would agree that ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

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