tillage implement Articles

  • Knowledge of Farm Practices – The Key for Successful Farming

    Agriculture plays an important part in the world economy. One-third of the economically active population obtains its livelihood from agriculture. In Asia and Africa, millions of small-scale farmers, fishermen, and indigenous people produce most of the food consumed worldwide, in most cases on very small plots of land. Agriculture is increasingly called upon to address a wide range of critical ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Zone tillage depth affects yield and economics of corn silage production

    Increasing numbers of dairies in northeastern United States are classified as confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs). Many dairy farmers in New York (NY) abandoned conventional and adopted zone tillage (ZT) in 4-yr corn (Zea mays L.) silage-alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) rotations on highly erodible land to comply with NY CAFO plans. Farmers now question optimum ZT depth because of increased ...

  • Zone tillage depth affects yield and economics of corn silage production

    Increasing numbers of dairies in northeastern United States are classified as confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs). Many dairy farmers in New York (NY) abandoned conventional and adopted zone tillage (ZT) in 4-yr corn (Zea mays L.) silage-alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) rotations on highly erodible land to comply with NY CAFO plans. Farmers now question optimum ZT depth because of increased ...

  • Nitrogen, tillage, and crop rotation effects on carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from irrigated cropping systems

    Received for publication December 15, 2008. Long-term effects of tillage intensity, N fertilization, and crop rotation on carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) flux from semiarid irrigated soils are poorly understood. We evaluated effects of: (i) tillage intensity [no-till (NT) and conventional moldboard plow tillage (CT)] in a continuous corn rotation; (ii) N fertilization levels [0–246 kg N ...

  • A model to predict safe stages of development for rice field draining and field tests of the model predictions in the Arkansas grand prairie

    Due to the cost of extracting water, effective and efficient utilization of irrigation water for rice (Oryza sativa L.) is critical to rice farm profitability. The objective of this study is to predict safe stages of development for draining rice. This objective has the potential of saving rice farmers water. A computer program has been developed to predict the stage of development for draining ...

  • Family farms can be competitive by focusing on conservation and stewardship

    While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports a 40 percent decline in U.S. cropland soil erosion rates from 1982 to 2007, recent trends appear to challenge this progress. Record prices for corn and soybeans have diverted acres out of conservation programs and encouraged intensive production on a wide scale. Tree lines are cleared and wet areas drained, turning 120-acre farms into ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Wholesale arable change leads to tight slug control

    "Eight years into implementing a zero-till policy across the farm, we’re seeing improved yields of 10 tonnes per hectare for our first year wheat, and five tonnes per hectare on winter beans. We’ve also noticed that we continue to see year-on-year improvements to soil structure and crop yields. “The winter beans have been extremely valuable in the rotation to ensure nitrogen and ...


    By Certis UK

  • Towards climate-responsible peatlands management

    Peatlands are lands with a naturally accumulated peat layer at their surface. They are found all over the world and come in many forms, display many different characteristics and are used in many different ways. Even though peatlands extend over a relatively small portion of the earth’s land surface, they hold a large pool of carbon. There is no universal definition of peatlands. For the ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Plan B 3.0 -- A Plan of Hope

    Plan B is shaped by what is needed to save civilization, not by what may currently be considered politically feasible. Plan B does not fit within a particular discipline, sector, or set of assumptions. Implementing Plan B means undertaking several actions simultaneously, including eradicating poverty, stabilizing population, and restoring the earth’s natural systems. It also involves cutting ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Planting trees and managing soils to sequester carbon

    As of 2007, the shrinking forests in the tropical regions were releasing 2.2 billion tons of carbon per year. Meanwhile, expanding forests in the temperate regions were absorbing 0.7 billion tons of carbon annually. On balance, a net of some 1.5 billion tons of carbon were being released into the atmosphere each year, contributing to global warming. The tropical deforestation in Asia is driven ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Biotechnology: APHIS Seeks Comment on Potentially Significant Changes to Regulations Regarding GE Organisms

    According to a Federal Register notice published on February 5, 2016, 81 Fed. Reg. 6225, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) announced its intent to "prepare a programmatic ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • Could food shortages bring down civilization?

    One of the toughest things for people to do is to anticipate sudden change. Typically we project the future by extrapolating from trends in the past. Much of the time this approach works well. But sometimes it fails spectacularly, and people are simply blindsided by events such as today’s economic crisis. For most of us, the idea that civilization itself could disintegrate probably seems ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

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