tree harvester Articles

  • Time for Trees to Pack Their Trunks?

    As climate changes, forest ecosystems will need to shift to more suitable sites. Should humans lend a helping hand? During the last two springs, contract planters for The Nature Conservancy have spread out through the pine, spruce and aspen forest of northeastern Minnesota. Wielding steel hoedads, they have planted almost 110,000 tree seedlings on public ...


    By Ensia

  • Biomass harvesting: how forest thinning can help prevent wildfires

    Every year, wildfires plague the nation. Once there’s an ignition source, dry foliage in country areas can quickly go up in flames, spreading through woodlands or grasslands quickly. While some wildfires can be small, others can be devastating and blaze through thousands of acres. While there’s no way to predict where wildfires may start, there are ways to minimize the damage of ...


    By Uzelac Industries, Inc

  • Impacts of harvest residue management on soil Carbon stocks in a plantation forest

    The impacts of plantation forest management on soil C stocks in New Zealand need to be better understood for the purposes of C accounting under the Kyoto Protocol. We investigated the impacts of three harvest residue management treatments on C and N stocks in a scoriaceous forest soil: whole-tree harvesting plus forest floor removal, whole-tree harvesting, and stem-only harvesting. Volumetric ...

  • Soil CO2 efflux in uneven-aged managed forests: temporal patterns following harvest and effects of edaphic heterogeneity

    AbstractForest management is expected to influence soil CO2 efflux (FCO2) as a result of changes in microclimatic conditions, soil properties, and root dynamics. We measured FCO2 during the growing seasons of 2003 and 2004 in both gap and non-gap locations within stands ranging from 0 to 10 years after the most recent harvest in a selection-managed northern hardwood forest in central Ontario, ...


    By Springer

  • On optimal forest management: a dynamic programming approach

    This paper studies optimal any-aged forest management, including uneven-aged and even-aged management as special cases. The approach is based on applying a dynamic programming approach. Dynamic optimisation is applied to study optimal profit-maximising harvesting policies, based on decomposing the forest management problem to smaller subproblems. The optimal harvesting policy implies a ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Basket weavers case study

    The fragile ecosystem of the area is surrounded by poor farming communities whose lifestyles often impact negatively on the ecosystem, especially due to harvesting of trees for firewood. One of the major challenges facing the district is the persistent and increasing incidence of poverty.32% of adults in this district live below food poverty level, and 26% below absolute poverty. In addition to ...


    By co2balance UK Ltd

  • Building an index of site suitability for forest residue removal

    Evelyne Thiffault said she would address ecological issues, although she emphasized that she believes “producing bioenergy from forest biomass is a great idea.” Forest biomass has an ecological value that must be considered, she said. If forest residues are removed to produce bioenergy, then the forest system is deprived of carbon and nutrients, and “you will impact the forest ecosystem.” ...

  • Environmental impacts of community-based forest management in the Philippines

    Community-based forest management (CBFM) is a major strategy in managing forest lands in the Philippines. Forest and land management activities implemented in CBFM project sites include management of tropical forests (enrichment planting, timber stand improvement or TSI and limited harvesting), rehabilitation of degraded lands (reforestation, assisted natural regeneration (ANR)) and agroforestry. ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Book Byte: We Can Reforest the Earth

    Protecting the 10 billion acres of remaining forests on earth and replanting many of those already lost are both essential for restoring the earth’s health. Since 2000, the earth’s forest cover has shrunk by 13 million acres each year, with annual losses of 32 million acres far exceeding the regrowth of 19 ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Coffee production systems

    Types of production systems Roughly, five types of coffee production systems can be distinguished (Moguel, 1996, in Courville, forthcoming): 1)Traditional rustic coffee system: coffee production under forest trees by substitution of plants growing on the floor of a (sub)-tropical forest with coffee. There is a minimal impact on the original forest ecosystem; 2)Traditional polyculture system ...


  • Can superfoods boost the planet’s health, too?

    As demand for African and Asian tree-based superfoods grows, researchers and entrepreneurs eye ways to maximize benefits for the environment. It can seem like new health food fads pop up every week — fads that often fade as quickly as they appear. Two gaining steam lately, though, may be worth a longer look: baobab and moringa. Traditional fare in parts of Africa (and for moringa, ...


    By Ensia

  • Which plants are needed for a French vertical-flow constructed wetland under a tropical climate?

    Plants are essential in the functioning of constructed wetlands. When setting up systems in tropical areas, Phragmites australis is not always a good choice because of its invasiveness. In vertical-flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) fed with raw wastewater, the main role of plants is their mechanical action, which helps prevent clogging of the deposited organic matter. Various species have ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Protecting and restoring forests

    Protecting the earth’s nearly 4 billion hectares of remaining forests and replanting those already lost are both essential for restoring the earth’s health, an important foundation for the new economy. Reducing rainfall runoff and the associated flooding and soil erosion, recycling rainfall inland, and restoring aquifer recharge depend on simultaneously reducing pressure on forests and on ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Improving Food Security in the Sahel is difficult, but achievable

    Africa’s Sahel suffers from degraded soils, erratic rainfall, and an exploding population—all of which hold huge implications for the region’s food security. A recent speech quantified just how dire the situation is this year. Valerie Amos, the United Nations coordinator for emergency relief, estimated at a conference in Rome earlier this month that 20 million people in the ...

  • California firm clears orchards for development, re-growth

    Although it is hard to tell it at first glance, many of the rural parts of north central California — those areas traditionally covered with full, lush orchards — are disappearing. A combination of agricultural economics and good old-fashioned real estate development are teaming up to turn land that was once invaluable for the crops it could yield, into land that is perhaps more valuable just as ...


  • Grow to Order and Seed Collection

    Local provenance planting is important to help restore our natural habitats and retain the genetic integrity of plant populations and is strongly recommended for projects within or near environmentally sensitive areas. Forward planning is essential when undertaking local provenance seed collection as there are seasonal constraints such as seed maturation time, finding seed donor sites and gaining ...


    By BritishFlora

  • Rethinking food production for a world of eight billion

    The World Food Programme and the Chinese government jointlyannounced that food aid shipments to China would stop at the end of theyear. For a country where a generation ago hundreds of millions of peoplewere chronically hungry, this was a landmark achievement. Not only hasChina ended its dependence on food aid, but almost overnight it has becomethe world’s third largest food aid donor. The key to ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Opportunities to Generate Cash Flow for Family Forests Using Conservation Payments

    There has been significant discussion about the merits of stacking conservation payments over the past few years. A simple explanation for credit stacking is when landowners are paid for conservation practices on their property that provide multiple benefits to the environment. Examples of credits types that might be stacked include: endangered species, water quality, wetlands, and carbon. ...


    By The Climate Trust

  • Shrinking forests: The many costs

    In early December 2004, Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo 'ordered the military and police to crack down on illegal logging, after flash floods and landslides, triggered by rampant deforestation, killed nearly 340 people,' according to news reports. Fifteen years earlier, in 1989, the government of Thailand announced a nationwide ban on tree cutting following severe flooding and the ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • The newest strategy for saving bees is really, really old

    With pollinators in decline around the world, conservationists turn to traditional farmers for answers. In northwestern India, the Himalaya Mountains rise sharply out of pine and cedar forests. The foothills of the Kullu Valley are blanketed with apple trees beginning to bloom. It’s a cool spring morning, and Lihat Ram, a farmer in Nashala village, shows me a ...


    By Ensia

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