vegetable growing industry Articles

  • Compost Markets Grow With Environmental Applications

    The use of compost in various environmental applications is one of the most intensive areas of compost research being pursued today. The high organic matter content and biological activity of compost makes it effective for use in a variety of applications. Five of these will be reviewed in this article: erosion control, revegetation, biofiltration, bioremediation, and wetlands construction. ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Affordable Orlando Organic Fertilizers, Healthy Soil for Vegetables & Crops

    The success of a garden or crops is directly affected by the health of the soil ecosystem, creating a bounty of delicious vegetables and beautiful flowers. For true sustainability, maximum nutrition and amazing flavor, organic fertilizers and black worm castings are the the answer. How to Create Healthy Soil? Don’t use synthetic fertilizer or harmful chemicals. “When ...


    By Vermitechnology Unlimited

  • The ever growing issue of work related Dermatitis

    Workers contracting dermatitis is becoming an increasing issue for businesses. Hundreds of occupational dermatitis cases are recorded every year. It can effect any worker at any age so all workers could potentially be at risk. Dermatitis at work causes the skin to become red, itchy and scaly,  it can even lead ...


    By Atrium Legal Service Limited

  • Cultivating energy crop production

    A NEW Farm Bill is moving through the Congressional legislative process. Along the way, commercial agriculture is debating the energy impacts of future corn and soybean production. The growth of corn-based ethanol and soybean-based biodiesel has created competition for the feed inputs into animal agriculture, namely corn and soybeans. While most of agriculture discusses energy production from ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Cannabis Irrigation-Israel

    Getting to Know Cannabis Farming Israel’s agricultural industry is ripening for the beginning of medical cannabis export, with the expected passage of medical export legislation by the end of the year. The timing is particularly fruitful for growers who are interested in succeeding in a new venture that is still in its infancy. The rewards are also high: Israel’s Health and ...


    By KIM

  • How green was my Vertical Farm?

    By 2050, 80% of the earth’s population will live in cities and 3 billion more people will need to be fed. The simple fact is we are running out of available land to grow enough food to feed them. If we can’t grow our cities outward to find more arable land, the only solution is to grow them upwards. This may change the way we design cities forever.The problem is real and immediate. Even by most ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Composting Roundup

    Cedar Rapids, Iowa: Ninja Food Scraps Collection Service Compost Ninja, an Iowa-based organics collection business founded by Aaron Hanson, started service on November 1, 2015. The Compost Ninja provides customers a 5-gallon bucket, which are set out weekly. The business currently has 39 residential and small business accounts in Iowa County, Linn County and Johnson County, Iowa. Each ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Produce Grower, August 2017 issue

    There may be no such thing as a perfect tomato, but due to research by Amy Bowen and Dave Liscombe at the Vineland Research and Innovation Centre, growers are one step closer to producing great ones. In 2012, the Ontario Greenhouse Vegetable Growers put out a list of research priorities, and one of those priorities was to improve or differentiate flavor in tomatoes. The focus was on tomatoes on ...

  • Green catering tips

    It's that time of the year again - party time. Whether it's St Patrick's Day, Easter, birthdays, Christmas, weddings, Thanksgiving, Halloween or Hanukkah, we all enjoy letting our hair down and having fun with friends and family! And with these events, come the mountains of munch-ables - tasty treats of every shape, colour and ingredient. But how green is our spinach really, and should we be ...


    By green24

  • CoirGreen™ : Helping you think and act green

    Many of us depend heavily on the environment to make a living. Yet, knowingly or unknowingly to us, our actions can have negative impact on the environment, such as ...


    By CoirGreen

  • Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield?

    City-based agriculture produces 15 to 20 percent of food globally. In the U.S., its benefits go far beyond nutrition. This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit investigative news organization. ...


    By Ensia

  • Biomass harvesting: how forest thinning can help prevent wildfires

    Every year, wildfires plague the nation. Once there’s an ignition source, dry foliage in country areas can quickly go up in flames, spreading through woodlands or grasslands quickly. While some wildfires can be small, others can be devastating and blaze through thousands of acres. While there’s no way to predict where wildfires may start, there are ways to minimize the damage of ...


    By Uzelac Industries, Inc

  • Palm oil: not the evil we think it is

    Oil palm is a globally important crop, but our hatred of it stops us from pushing for better ways to develop it. The oil palm, one of around 2,600 species of palm, must be one of the most hated plants on Earth. Ask any self-respecting environmentalist, and his or her face is likely to turn red with anger at the mere mention of its reviled name: Oil Palm. The oil ...


    By Ensia

  • Can superfoods boost the planet’s health, too?

    As demand for African and Asian tree-based superfoods grows, researchers and entrepreneurs eye ways to maximize benefits for the environment. It can seem like new health food fads pop up every week — fads that often fade as quickly as they appear. Two gaining steam lately, though, may be worth a longer look: baobab and moringa. Traditional fare in parts of Africa (and for moringa, ...


    By Ensia

  • The localization of agriculture

    In the United States, there has been a surge of interest in eating fresh local foods, corresponding with mounting concerns about the climate effects of consuming food from distant places and about the obesity and other health problems associated with junk food diets. This is reflected in the rise in urban gardening, school gardening, and farmers’ markets. With the fast-growing local foods ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Getting kids to eat green

    Kids love food, but it's not always the tasty treats that are good for them or the earth. Fatty, sugary, salty and processed foods generally have more of an environmental impact than eats of the fresh, locally produced variety. It is therefore important to teach them what is healthy to eat, and how and where their food comes from. This will help them to understand the impact of the food they eat, ...


    By green24

  • Singer's algorithm controls farm irrigation case study

    Their Challenge On the San Xavier Reservation near Tucson, Arizona, the Tohono O’odom Nation grows organic alfalfa for racing horses plus fruits and vegetables. Thanks to Singer Valve, San Xavier is home to a sophisticated flood irrigation system that consists of one 16” (400 mm) globe style and eight 16” angle style valves and five storage tanks each with its own ...


    By Singer Valve Inc.

  • Project aims to produce fertilizer from wastes

    With the highest cattle density in northeastern Wisconsin and urban sprawl sprawling, Brown County has accelerated its investigation into how to handle growing amounts of dairy manure and industrial wastes spread on a diminishing land base.Applying waste on limited crop acreage has led to groundwater contamination issues and pollution problems of lower Green Bay.The solution lies in a value-added ...


    By FEECO International, Inc.

  • What is the Future of Horticultural Science in Africa?

    Horticulture is a labour intensive sector that is important for human wellbeing: 'agriculture supplies protein, carbohydrates and staple crops - but we would have a pretty boring life without horticulture.' Nevertheless, in many countries, faculties of agriculture and their departments of horticulture have been swallowed by schools of life or earth sciences. As a result horticulture gets ...

  • Biomimicry: solutions hidden in plain sight

    Some call it arrogance, the way human beings believe it is possible to out-smart nature with science and technology. Now, Houston and other large cities deal with excessive water runoff as a result of cutting down forests and paving over prairie. The fish in most ...

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