vegetable harvesting system Articles

  • Knowledge of Farm Practices – The Key for Successful Farming

    Agriculture plays an important part in the world economy. One-third of the economically active population obtains its livelihood from agriculture. In Asia and Africa, millions of small-scale farmers, fishermen, and indigenous people produce most of the food consumed worldwide, in most cases on very small plots of land. Agriculture is increasingly called upon to address a wide range of critical ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • Effect of ethylene on fruits and vegetables rotting

    In the latest edition of Bioconservacion's Partner Meeting with all its partners from the post-harvest sector, we had the good fortune to have Professor Emeritus Ron Wills from the University of Newcastle in Australia. Dr Wills, with over 50 years experience researching agronomy, agriculture and post-harvest techniques is undoubtedly a leader in the sector and one of the great experts on ethylene ...


    By Bioconservacion SA

  • Assessment of pasture biomass with the normalized difference vegetation index from active ground-based sensors

    Calculating forage availability is challenging for managers of grazing systems due to the spatial heterogeneity of swards. Remote sensing applications may help to overcome this problem through estimates of biomass made with reflectance data. The objectives of this study were to (i) estimate herbage mass using an active, on-the-go, ground-based, narrow band sensor to calculate the normalized ...

  • Reference: Apples fresh from the wash

    Just in time for the apple harvest: a Polish fruit and vegetable processing plant has opted for technical support in the form of a ProMinent chlorine dioxide system for the efficient treatment of the water used for washing. Problems in production Polish fruit and vegetable processing company Champion Sp. z o.o. is based in Jarogniewice, 40 kilometres south-west of Poznań. ...

  • Hydroponic cultivation of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) using effluents from primary, secondary and tertiary + UV treatments

    ABSTRACTThe aim of this study was to evaluate the potential cultivation of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) with domestic wastewater effluents with different levels of treatment from a compact WWTP in Brazil. Vegetables were grown in five treatments: nutrient solution (control), secondary effluent diluted 50%, secondary effluent not diluted, tertiary effluent UV irradiated, and UASB effluent. ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • A machine learning approach to crop localisation using spatial information

    This paper describes an approach to recognise and localise centres of mature lettuce heads in the field when the lettuce leaves obscure the distinctions between plants. This is of great value when using an automatic harvester in cluttered or closely planted vegetation. The aim of this work is to investigate and verify the potential use of spatial rather than visual clues for recognition and ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Forecasting cotton yield in the southeastern United States using coupled global circulation models

    We developed methods of forecasting cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. var. hirsutum) yields at a county level 3 mo before harvest for the states of Alabama and Georgia. Cotton yield historical records for 57 counties were obtained from NASS and detrended using a low-pass spectral filter. A Canonical Correlation Analysis regression-based model was annually recalibrated to incorporate the year-by-year ...

  • Stud case study

    A major vegetable grower in Lantokia, Fiji, using soilless culture systems began to trial Amnite A-100. His crops consisted principally of lettuce, tomatoes, capsicums, cucumbers, zucchinis and melons. Before the trials they had been plagued with root diseases, mosaic virus and insect attack, control of which required constant use of pesticides and ultraviolet lighting. The first trials commenced ...


    By Cleveland Biotech Ltd.

  • Cultivating energy crop production

    A NEW Farm Bill is moving through the Congressional legislative process. Along the way, commercial agriculture is debating the energy impacts of future corn and soybean production. The growth of corn-based ethanol and soybean-based biodiesel has created competition for the feed inputs into animal agriculture, namely corn and soybeans. While most of agriculture discusses energy production from ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • HCBD uptake into edible plant

    Client: Confidential Location: UK Services: Research and Development, Human Health Risk Assessment Summary: This research programme increased the knowledge base regarding uptake of HCBD, enabling a better understanding of exposures to this compound in the environment During discussions with the public and within ...

  • Integrating ecosystem services into crop protection and pest management: Case study with the soil fumigant 1,3‐dichloropropene and its use in tomato production in Italy

    Ecosystems provide the conditions for producing food, regulating water, and providing wildlife habitats; these, among others, are known as ecosystem services (ESs). Food production is both economically and culturally important to southern European farmers, particularly in Italy where farmers grow flavorsome tomatoes with passion and pride. Growers rely on pesticides for crop protection, the ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Ontario Horticulture Research Priority Report 2016

    Sector Consultation The Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association partnered with Vineland to host a research strategy workshop in November 2014 with the goal of defining the top five research priorities for each crop group. Grower organizations were invited to nominate two representatives to participate on their behalf and a number of researchers from relevant fields were invited to ...

  • Family farms can be competitive by focusing on conservation and stewardship

    While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reports a 40 percent decline in U.S. cropland soil erosion rates from 1982 to 2007, recent trends appear to challenge this progress. Record prices for corn and soybeans have diverted acres out of conservation programs and encouraged intensive production on a wide scale. Tree lines are cleared and wet areas drained, turning 120-acre farms into ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Crops flourish with Scalewatcher

    Water is an essential component of horticulture and agriculture whether it is used for irrigating field-scale vegetables, nursery stock, flowers or fruit.  Where water contains high degrees of calcium, magnesium and sodium, it can cause nutrient deficiency in plants and crops resulting in stunted growth and poor yields. Calcium also blocks irrigation systems and boilers in heated ...

  • The newest strategy for saving bees is really, really old

    With pollinators in decline around the world, conservationists turn to traditional farmers for answers. In northwestern India, the Himalaya Mountains rise sharply out of pine and cedar forests. The foothills of the Kullu Valley are blanketed with apple trees beginning to bloom. It’s a cool spring morning, and Lihat Ram, a farmer in Nashala village, shows me a ...


    By Ensia

  • Improving Food Security in the Sahel is difficult, but achievable

    Africa’s Sahel suffers from degraded soils, erratic rainfall, and an exploding population—all of which hold huge implications for the region’s food security. A recent speech quantified just how dire the situation is this year. Valerie Amos, the United Nations coordinator for emergency relief, estimated at a conference in Rome earlier this month that 20 million people in the ...

  • Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield?

    City-based agriculture produces 15 to 20 percent of food globally. In the U.S., its benefits go far beyond nutrition. This story was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, a non-profit investigative news organization. ...


    By Ensia

  • How farm policy used to work

    In the period between the 1930s and 1992, farm bills generally instituted compensation policies that took the form of price supports. These policies were designed to manage the surplus production that resulted from centuries of developmental policies while allowing U.S. farmers the chance, with hard work and good management skills, to provide their family with a livelihood. Compensation policies ...


    By National Farmers Union

  • Composting In rural Alaska

    Gardeners, communities and commercial enterprises have proven that composting works in Alaska, especially given large quantities of fish waste and diminishing landfill capacity. ALASKA is two and a half times larger than the largest state in the lower 48 states. Over half of the entire state’s population lives within the municipality of Anchorage. Many Alaskan villages can only be reached ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • How three U.S. mini-farms are sowing the seeds of global food security

    Tiny, biointensive operations show smallholder farmers from around the world how they can grow far more food than conventional approaches. Her face shaded by a wide-brimmed straw hat, Olawumi Benedict is cheerfully tending to her “little babies” — kale seedlings growing in shallow wooden flats until they’re hardy enough for transplantation into soil beds. Three miles over ...


    By Ensia

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