wheat growth stage Articles

  • Knowledge of Farm Practices – The Key for Successful Farming

    Agriculture plays an important part in the world economy. One-third of the economically active population obtains its livelihood from agriculture. In Asia and Africa, millions of small-scale farmers, fishermen, and indigenous people produce most of the food consumed worldwide, in most cases on very small plots of land. Agriculture is increasingly called upon to address a wide range of critical ...


    By Agrivi Ltd

  • New and diverse sources of multiple disease resistance in Wheat

    Tan spot (caused by Pyrenophora tritici-repentis) and Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB), (caused by Phaeosphaeria nodorum) are destructive diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The majority of currently grown wheat varieties are susceptible to both diseases, presumably because of high pathogenic variability occurring in these fungi or narrow genetic background for resistance in wheat ...

  • Spatial analysis of early wheat canopy normalized difference vegetative index

    Efficient use of real-time canopy sensors requires knowledge of the scale (resolution) of variation in the measured canopy property. Knowing the amount of needed optical data requires estimation of the optimal combination of physical sensor density (number of sensors along the applicator boom) and sensor output density (sensor readings per unit distance along the travel path). The objective of ...

  • Aerial color infrared photography to optimize in-season nitrogen fertilizer recommendations in winter wheat

    Remote sensing in the form of aerial color infrared (CIR) photography has been shown to be a useful tool for in-season N management in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The objectives of this study were (i) to develop a methodology for predicting in-season optimum fertilizer N rates for winter wheat at growth stage (GS) 30 directly from aerial CIR photography and (ii) to quantify how the ...

  • Impacts of climate change on irrigation water requirements for rice–wheat cultivation in Bagmati River Basin, Nepal

    This study highlights the spatial and temporal impacts of climate change on rice–wheat cropping systems, focusing on irrigation water requirement (IWR) in the Bagmati River Basin of Nepal. The outputs from a general circulation model (HadCM3) for two selected scenarios (A2 and B2) of IPCC and for three time periods (2020s, 2050s, and 2080s) have been downscaled and compared to a baseline ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • On-farm evaluation of winter wheat yield response to residual soil Nitrate-N in North China plain

    High soil nitrate-N accumulation has been observed in North China Plain (NCP), but it was seldom considered as a N source in N management due to the lack of data on crop response to soil nitrate-N accumulation. A total of 124 on-farm N-response experiments were conducted from 2003 to 2006 in seven key winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production regions of NCP to evaluate wheat yield response ...

  • Combined spectral index to improve ground-based estimates of Nitrogen status in dryland Wheat

    Spectral indices are useful for estimating crop yield potential and basing in-season N fertilizer applications. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is positively related to crop N status and leaf area index (LAI) under N limited conditions. However, under water limited conditions, variations in LAI may be driven by soil moisture rather than plant-available N, which will confound ...

  • Spatial analysis of early wheat canopy normalized difference vegetative index: determining appropriate observation scale

    Efficient use of real-time canopy sensors requires knowledge of the scale (resolution) of variation in the measured canopy property. Knowing the amount of needed optical data requires estimation of the optimal combination of physical sensor density (number of sensors along the applicator boom) and sensor output density (sensor readings per unit distance along the travel path). The objective of ...

  • South Korea Agribusiness Report Analysis Q1 2014

    While we are sanguine towards the long-term outlook of South Korea's agricultural sector, we are concerned about the short-term restructuring of the industry due to a mismatch of domestic demand and supply of livestock. Our positive outlook towards the sector is predicated on the government's decision to gradually remove barriers to trade and move up the value chain. Indeed, the expansion of ...


  • Growing demand for soybeans threatens Amazon rainforest

    Some 3,000 years ago, farmers in eastern China domesticated the soybean. In 1765, the first soybeans were planted in North America. Today the soybean occupies more U.S. cropland than wheat. And in Brazil, where it spread even more rapidly, the soybean is invading the Amazon rainforest. For close to two centuries after its introduction into the United States the soybean languished as a curiosity ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • Bumper 2011 Grain Harvest Fails to Rebuild Global Stocks

    The world’s farmers produced more grain in 2011 than ever before. Estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture show the global grain harvest coming in at 2,295 million tons, up 53 million tons from the previous record in 2009. Consumption grew by 90 million tons over the same period to 2,280 million tons. Yet with global grain production actually falling short of consumption in 7 ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • One crop, two ways, multiple benefits

    Nitrogen fixation is one of the best examples of cooperation in nature. Soil microbes – naturally occurring bacteria in the soil – work with plants to pull nitrogen from the air. They turn the nitrogen into a form the plant is able to use. In return, the plant lets the microbes eat some of the sugars it makes. Faba beans (also called fava beans) are one example of plants that work ...

  • Many Countries Reaching Diminishing Returns in Fertilizer Use

    When German chemist Justus von Liebig demonstrated in 1847 that the major nutrients that plants removed from the soil could be applied in mineral form, he set the stage for the development of the fertilizer industry and a huge jump in world food production a century later. Growth in food production during the nineteenth century came primarily from expanding cultivated area. It was not until the ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • LIVE FROM THE NCRS: Yet Another Busy Day at the NCRS

    So yesterday (Wednesday Jul 22, 2015) was another busy day to take advantage of the nice weather.  Like moving the wheat harvest operation over to Farm 7. ...

  • Learning from past civilizations

    To understand our current environmental dilemma, it helps to look at earlier civilizations that also got into environmental trouble. Our early twenty-first century civilization is not the first to face the prospect of environmentally induced economic decline. The question is how we will respond. As Jared Diamond points out in his book Collapse, some of the early societies that were in ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • India's Dangerous 'Food Bubble'

    India is now the world's third-largest grain producer after China and the United States. The adoption of higher-yielding crop varieties and the spread of irrigation have led to this remarkable tripling of output since the early 1960s. Unfortunately, a growing share of the water that irrigates three-fifths of India's grain harvest is coming from wells that are starting to go dry. This sets the ...


    By Earth Policy Institute

  • California company closes the composting loop

    BEFORE we made our first ton of compost, we had already talked to farmers to determine what they needed in a soil amendment,” says Roger Van Der Wende, Vice President, Supermarket Division, Community Recycling & Resource Recovery, Inc. (Community) in Sun Valley, California. Considering the fastidious navigation the company has done to advance in a previously uncharted realm of resource ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • BioCycle world

    The Climate Action Reserve (CAR) Board of Directors unanimously adopted the Organic Waste Digestion (OWD) Project Protocol, which provides a standardized approach for quantifying, monitoring and verifying greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions from organic waste diversion projects. Development of the OWD protocol was described in a detailed article in last month’s BioCycle, “GHG Reductions From Organic ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

Need help finding the right suppliers? Try XPRT Sourcing. Let the XPRTs do the work for you