John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Routes of uptake of diclofenac, fluoxetine, and triclosan into sediment‐dwelling worms

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This study investigated the route and degree of uptake of two ionisable pharmaceuticals (diclofenac and fluoxetine) and one ionisable compound used in personal care products (triclosan) into the sediment dwelling worm, Lumbriculus variegatus. Studies were done on complete worms (‘feeding’) and worms where the head was absent (‘non‐feeding’) using 14C labelled ingredients. Biota sediment accumulation factors, based on uptake of 14C, for ‘feeding’ worms increased in the order fluoxetine (BSAF = 0.3) < diclofenac (BSAF = 0.5) < triclosan (BSAF = 9), which is correlated with a corresponding increase in log KOW. BSAF estimates are representative of maximum values since the degree of biotransformation in the worms was not quantified. While, no significant differences were seen between the uptake of diclofenac and fluoxetine in feeding and non‐feeding worms, the uptake of the more hydrophobic anti‐microbial, triclosan, into the ‘feeding’ worms was significantly greater than the ‘non‐feeding’ worms with the 48h BSAF for feeding worms being 36% higher than for the non‐feeding worms. Our results imply that dietary uptake contributes to the uptake of triclosan which may be a result of the high hydrophobicity of the compound. Models that estimate exposure of ionisable substances may need to consider uptake from both the water column and via food, particularly when assessing risks from dynamic exposures to organic contaminants. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved

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