John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Sorption, uptake and biotransformation of 17β‐estradiol, 17α‐ethinylestradiol, zeranol and trenbolone acetate by hybrid poplar

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Hormonally active compounds may move with agricultural runoff from fields with applied manure and biosolids into surface waters where they pose a threat to human and environmental health. Riparian zone plants could remove hormonally active compounds from agricultural runoff. Therefore, sorption to roots, uptake, translocation, and transformation of three estrogens (17β‐estradiol, 17α‐ethinylestradiol, and zeranol) and one androgen (trenbolone acetate) commonly found in animal manure or biosolids were assessed by hydroponically‐grown hybrid poplar, Populus deltoides x nigra, DN‐34, widely used in riparian buffer strips. Results clearly showed that these hormones were rapidly removed from 2 mg L−1 hydroponic solutions by more than 97% after 10 days of exposure to full poplar plants or live excised poplars (cut‐stem, no leaves). Removals by sorption to dead poplar roots that had been autoclaved were significantly less, 71‐84%. Major transformation products (estrone and estriol for estradiol, zearalanone for zeranol, and 17β‐trenbolone from trenbolone acetate) were detected in the root tissues of all three poplar treatments. Root concentrations of metabolites peaked after 1 to 5 days and then decreased in full and live excised poplars by further transformation. Metabolite concentrations were less in dead poplar treatments and only slowly increased without further transformation. Taken together, these findings show that poplars may be effective in controlling the movement of hormonally active compounds from agricultural fields and avoiding runoff to streams. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved

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