Center for Environment and Energy Research & Studies (CEERS)

The role of urban forest in the protection of human environmental health in geographically-prone unpredictable hostile weather conditions

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INTRODUCTION

The structure of urban forest Few people know how many or what kind of trees are found in urban areas, or the effect these trees have on a city’s environment and the health and well being of its inhabitants. In order to understand the urban forest structure and its function in environmental improvement 5 major landscape elements, i.e., building and hard pavement surface, water, road, urban forest, and general green land in the area (Brazel et al., 2000, Wu et al., 2003) must be considered. Hence, larger pieces (1.5-3.0 hm2) of urban forest patch should be built, and more urban forests should be established in the cities. Based on field data from 10 USA cities and national urban tree cover data (Nowak et al., 2002), it is estimated that urban trees in the coterminous USA currently store 700 million tonnes of carbon ($14,300 million value) with a gross carbon sequestration rate of 22.8 million tC/yr ($460 million/year). Urban forests in the north central, northeast, south central and southeast regions of the USA store and sequester the most carbon, with average carbon storage per hectare greatest in southeast, north central, northeast and Pacific northwest regions, respectively. The national average urban forest carbon storage density is 25.1 tC/ha, compared with 53.5 tC/ha in forest stands. These data emphasizes the potential role of urban forests in reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide, a dominant greenhouse gas. (Nowak et al., 2001). This review is aimed at assessing and evaluating urban forest resources, understanding how urbanization impacts local forest stands, and in assisting city planners in developing appropriate management plans. Hence, the structure, composition, and health of the urban forest resources and how the can be changed, and the factors of the environment could effects these changes. Structural data have been used to determine the effects of urban forest on air quality air, water quality, building energy use, urban climate, ultraviolet radiation, etc. Understanding and quantifying the impact of urban trees is an important prerequisite to managing city vegetation to improve

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