Hay Caps

With over 25 years of experience in the hay industry we searched worldwide, thinking there must be a better way than hay tarps for storing extra hay. Hay Caps are innovative & simple covers made for large square bales of hay that can be applied safely at ground level. The covered bales are then stacked into place on the top of the stack as you build it. Folds butt together, creating a roof over the hay.

Company details

4950 Colorado Blvd , Denver , Colorado 80216 USA

More Office Locations Locations Served

Business Type:
Manufacturer
Industry Type:
Agriculture
Market Focus:
Globally (various continents)

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With over 25 years of experience in the hay industry we searched worldwide, thinking there must be a better way than hay tarps for storing extra hay.

We didn’t find it – so we invented the Hay Cap brand covers.
The HAY CAPTM brand covers are innovative & simple covers made for large square bales of hay that can be applied safely at ground level. The covered bales are then stacked into place on the top of the stack as you build it. Folds butt together, creating a roof over the hay.

Patented & trademarked, HAY CAPTM brand covers are made from food grade recycled plastic and take less than a minute to put on. With an expected lifespan of over 10 years, and the convenience of storing hay almost anywhere, the HAY CAPTM brand covers are the most economical storage solution on the market today.

And over 1,000 farmers and contractors across
Australia now agree with us.

  • HAY CAPTM brand covers are quick to apply,
  • Very simple to use,
  • Effective in protecting your haystacks,
  • Reusable over and over again & built tough to last.
  • And remember it is all done at ground level.

Join the hundreds of happy customers

Covering their hay the safe way!
Invented, manufactured and marketed in the Riverina, NSW, Australia

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Inventor of the HAY CAP brand covers Phil Snowden & wife Lynda have been farming in the Riverina, Australia since 1990. They operate a mixed irrigated & dryland farming business specialising in irrigated lucerne & cereal hay production.

Phil is an honest, hardworking, innovative farmer who thinks outside the square. He is not afraid to question “traditional” farming methods, and experiment with new ideas.

Phil & Lynda are in farming for the long haul and their commitment is evident being foundation members of both the Fullers Road Landcare Group & the Australian Fodder Industry Association. Phil is a big advocate for the irrigation industry and long term productivity of the Riverina.

HAY CAP brand covers are “something we wished we had thought of 10 or 15 years ago” says Phil. “We would have saved ourselves a lot of hassle with tarping our extra hay in good seasons we haven’t got the shed space for. You need very calm weather to put a tarpaulin over a stack, and there are real safety issues, but the Hay Cap overcomes all those issues because it can be placed on the bale at ground level and the bale can be placed on top of the stack”.

“In 2012 on our farm we sold the 4000 bales of oaten hay from 2010 season with minimal losses. All this hay was covered with Hay Caps. Not only did we have 910mm of rain over the 15 months but also a mouse plague. Apart from one stack of hay that floodwaters went through we have sold every one of those bales.”

The HAY CAP brand covers are manufactured on our farm with extensive storage facilities ready for distribution directly to the customer.

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Rain

For every 1” rain on a stack of 8’x4’x3’ bales of hay 75lts of water goes into each top bale

3” (75mm) of rain = a 44 gallon drum full of water / top bale

Or here it is another way:

350mm of rain on top of a 8x4x3 bale of hay will put 1 cubic metre of water into that bale

Hay needs to be covered.

The rain in the Eastern States of Australia March 2012 was unprecedented. It was proven yet again that hay needs to be stored properly until the market needs it. Cereal hay made in 2010 that couldn’t be sold in 2011 was then in high demand in 2012. Rainfall in that 18 month period was upward of 36” including flooding rains of 10” in 1 week.

Buyers and transporters don’t like mouldy or rotten hay, and there are examples of uncovered stacks losing 50% of the bales due to this in that time frame. Proving yet again that hay not stored correctly costs money due to high losses.

Australian Fodder Industry Association (AFIA) compiled an interesting article comparing hay storage options in their summer 2010 newsletter.