Worldwatch Institute

10 Books found

Books

  • State of the World 2010: Transforming Cultures

    State of the World 2010: Transforming Cultures

    Like a tsunami, consumerism has engulfed human cultures and Earth’s ecosystems. Left unaddressed, we risk global disaster. But if we channel this wave, intentionally transforming our cultures to center on sustainability, we will not only prevent catastrophe, but may usher in an era of sustainability—one that allows all people to thrive while protecting, even restoring, Earth.In State of the World 2010, sixty renowned res

  • Vital Signs 2010

    Vital Signs 2010

    From rising meat and seafood production to changes in the climate, Vital Signs 2010 documents 24 trends that are shaping our future and includes concise analyses and clear graphs.

  • Vital Signs 2009

    Vital Signs 2009

    Vital Signs 2009 includes 25 trends in one convenient reference guide. Covers pressing trends in energy, agriculture, transportation, climate, health, the economy, population, and other areas to inform and inspire the changes needed to build a sustainable world.

  • State of the World 2007: Our Urban Future

    State of the World 2007: Our Urban Future

    In 2008, half of the Earth’s population will live in urban areas, marking the first time in history that humans are an urban species. State of the World 2007: Our Urban Future examines changes in the ways cities are managed, built, and lived in that could tip the balance towards a healthier and more peaceful urban future.The PDF version(s) of State of the World 2007 include 'Geotag' links to satellite photos wi

  • Catch of the Day: Choosing Seafood for Healthier Oceans

    Catch of the Day: Choosing Seafood for Healthier Oceans

    At a time when international treaties, restrictive quotas, and global regulation of fleets have proven ineffective in protecting beleaguered fish populations, a surprising ally is emerging to tackle the growing fisheries crisis. Buyers of seafood—including individual consumers, school cafeterias, supermarket chains, and large food processors—are choosing to avoid threatened or problematic species in favor of fish that are caught or

  • Happier Meals: Rethinking the Global Meat Industry

    Happier Meals: Rethinking the Global Meat Industry

    In Happier Meals: Rethinking the Global Meat Industry, Worldwatch researcher Danielle Nierenberg documents the harmful effects of factory farming in both industrialized and developing countries and explains the range of consequences for the environment, human health and communities. From transmission of disease and loss of livestock diversity to hazardous and unsanitary processing methods, this book shows clearly why factory farming is an unsa

  • Venture Capitalism for a Tropical Forest: Cocoa in the Mata Atlantica

    Venture Capitalism for a Tropical Forest: Cocoa in the Mata Atlantica

    The Brazilian Atlantic Forest is one of the world's biological 'hotspots,' a region of extraordinary, and threatened, biodiversity. Saving the Atlantic Forest will require a variety of strategies. An approach described in this paper hinges on one of the world's favorite foods: cocoa. Cocoa is a major crop in Brazil, especially in the northeastern state of Bahia, where most cocoa is grown in a longstanding agroforestry system called cabruca. Be

  • Home Grown: The Case For Local Food In A Global Market

    Home Grown: The Case For Local Food In A Global Market

    Everyone, everywhere depends increasingly on long-distance food. Encouraged by food processing innovations, cheap oil, and subsidies, since 1961 the value of global trade in food has tripled and the tonnage of food shipped between nations has grown fourfold, while population has only doubled. In the United States, food typically travels between 1,500 and 2,500 miles from farm to plate, as much as 25 percent farther than in 1980.For so

  • Farming Fish for the Future

    Farming Fish for the Future

    SummaryFrom Asia to North America, people are eating more seafood, either because it’s the most affordable form of protein (as in many poorer nations) or because it’s the latest health food trend (as in many wealthy nations). But as the demand for fish rises, populations of both marine and freshwater species are being overexploited, resulting in stagnant or declining catches from many wild fisheries.

  • State of the World 2014: Governing for Sustainability

    State of the World 2014: Governing for Sustainability

    Citizens expect their governments to lead on sustainability. But from largely disappointing international conferences like Rio II to the U.S.’s failure to pass meaningful climate legislation, governments’ progress has been lackluster. That’s not to say leadership is absent; it just often comes from the bottom up rather than the top down. Action—on climate, species loss, inequity, and other sustainability crises—is