13 Books found

Books

  • Mitigating Climate Change Through Food and Land Use

    Mitigating Climate Change Through Food and Land Use

    SummaryLand makes up a quarter of Earth’s surface, and its soil and plants hold three times as much carbon as the atmosphere. More than 30 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions arise from the land use sector. Thus, no strategy for mitigating global climate change can be complete or successful without reducing emissions from agriculture, forestry, and other land uses. Moreover, only land-based or “terrest

  • Vital Signs 2009

    Vital Signs 2009

    Vital Signs 2009 includes 25 trends in one convenient reference guide. Covers pressing trends in energy, agriculture, transportation, climate, health, the economy, population, and other areas to inform and inspire the changes needed to build a sustainable world.

  • State of the World 2007: Our Urban Future

    State of the World 2007: Our Urban Future

    In 2008, half of the Earth’s population will live in urban areas, marking the first time in history that humans are an urban species. State of the World 2007: Our Urban Future examines changes in the ways cities are managed, built, and lived in that could tip the balance towards a healthier and more peaceful urban future.The PDF version(s) of State of the World 2007 include 'Geotag' links to satellite photos wi

  • Catch of the Day: Choosing Seafood for Healthier Oceans

    Catch of the Day: Choosing Seafood for Healthier Oceans

    At a time when international treaties, restrictive quotas, and global regulation of fleets have proven ineffective in protecting beleaguered fish populations, a surprising ally is emerging to tackle the growing fisheries crisis. Buyers of seafood—including individual consumers, school cafeterias, supermarket chains, and large food processors—are choosing to avoid threatened or problematic species in favor of fish that are caught or

  • Happier Meals: Rethinking the Global Meat Industry

    Happier Meals: Rethinking the Global Meat Industry

    In Happier Meals: Rethinking the Global Meat Industry, Worldwatch researcher Danielle Nierenberg documents the harmful effects of factory farming in both industrialized and developing countries and explains the range of consequences for the environment, human health and communities. From transmission of disease and loss of livestock diversity to hazardous and unsanitary processing methods, this book shows clearly why factory farming is an unsa

  • Venture Capitalism for a Tropical Forest: Cocoa in the Mata Atlantica

    Venture Capitalism for a Tropical Forest: Cocoa in the Mata Atlantica

    The Brazilian Atlantic Forest is one of the world's biological 'hotspots,' a region of extraordinary, and threatened, biodiversity. Saving the Atlantic Forest will require a variety of strategies. An approach described in this paper hinges on one of the world's favorite foods: cocoa. Cocoa is a major crop in Brazil, especially in the northeastern state of Bahia, where most cocoa is grown in a longstanding agroforestry system called cabruca. Be

  • Home Grown: The Case For Local Food In A Global Market

    Home Grown: The Case For Local Food In A Global Market

    Everyone, everywhere depends increasingly on long-distance food. Encouraged by food processing innovations, cheap oil, and subsidies, since 1961 the value of global trade in food has tripled and the tonnage of food shipped between nations has grown fourfold, while population has only doubled. In the United States, food typically travels between 1,500 and 2,500 miles from farm to plate, as much as 25 percent farther than in 1980.For so

  • Correcting Gender Myopia: Gender Equity, Women"s Welfare, And The Environment

    Correcting Gender Myopia: Gender Equity, Women"s Welfare, And The Environment

    At international conferences throughout the 1990"s--in Rio de Janeiro, Vienna, Cairo, and Beijing--a new vision of women"s health, welfare, and rights was created. This vision acknowledged the deep connections between support for educational, economic, social, and political opportunity for women on the one hand, and progress in stabilizing population growth, protecting the environment, and improving human health on the other.Despite i

  • Reading the Weathervane: Climate Policy from Rio To Johannesburg

    Reading the Weathervane: Climate Policy from Rio To Johannesburg

    The world is on the brink of bringing into force one of the most far-reaching environmental treaties of all time, the Kyoto Protocol. And even without the world's largest emitter of greenhouse gases, the United States, on board, signatories of the Protocol are setting the stage for a new generation of policymaking worldwide, reports a new study-the first ten-year review of global climate policy since the Rio Earth Summit.

  • Still Waiting for the Jubilee: Pragmatic Solutions for the Third World Debt Crisis

    Still Waiting for the Jubilee: Pragmatic Solutions for the Third World Debt Crisis

    Since the end of World War II, the richest countries have lent the poorest ones hundreds of billions of dollars, much of it in the name of democracy, freedom, and development. Yet scores of the borrowing countries are now mired in debt and poverty—some 47, according to World Bank benchmarks, all but 10 of them African. Together, they owe $422 billion, or $380 per person—a substantial sum for them, but just 11 months of military spe

  • Farming Fish for the Future

    Farming Fish for the Future

    SummaryFrom Asia to North America, people are eating more seafood, either because it’s the most affordable form of protein (as in many poorer nations) or because it’s the latest health food trend (as in many wealthy nations). But as the demand for fish rises, populations of both marine and freshwater species are being overexploited, resulting in stagnant or declining catches from many wild fisheries.

  • State of the World 2014: Governing for Sustainability

    State of the World 2014: Governing for Sustainability

    Citizens expect their governments to lead on sustainability. But from largely disappointing international conferences like Rio II to the U.S.’s failure to pass meaningful climate legislation, governments’ progress has been lackluster. That’s not to say leadership is absent; it just often comes from the bottom up rather than the top down. Action—on climate, species loss, inequity, and other sustainability crises—is