Crop Health News

  • Biodiversity is the basis for Integrated Pest Management

    Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is now the norm in agriculture and horticulture. All stakeholders – national and European government agencies and public bodies, agriculture and horticulture organisations, businesses, universities and research institutes – agree with this statement. "More biodiversity and the use of resistant plants are crucial to the successful implementation of ...

  • Sentera Dramatically Increases Accessibility of Crop Health Data

    Sentera announces the release of AgVault™ Web, extending the power of the AgVault platform to any connected, browser-equipped device. Web users can easily view and share crop health data, and users on desktop, mobile and web can use the new toolset to quickly share field data with anyone, regardless if the recipient has an active account. AgVault Web makes remote collaboration easy and ...


    By Sentera, LLC

  • Semios Receives EPA Approval to Combat Difficult Citrus Pest

    Semios is pleased to announce it has received Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and California Department of Pest Regulation (DPR)  approval for CRS Plus, an aerosol pheromone biopesticide product that disrupts the mating of Aonidiella aurantii, also known as California Red Scale (CRS). CRS attacks all aerial parts of citrus trees including twigs, leaves, branches, and, most importantly, ...


    By SemiosBio Technologies Inc.

  • Protect your field, yield and profits from day one

    Following their recent aquisition of the seed treatment Latitude, Certis are looking forward to Cereals and the opportunity to discuss with visitors the issue of take-all and how to protect crops from this devastating disease from day one. “Take-all is an extremely significant and widespread fungal disease that occurs in wheat and barley, with half the UK wheat crops estimated to be ...


    By Certis UK

  • Pests, Weeds and Crop Diseases Arriving Early You are here

    A warmer than usual winter and wet spring are ushering in some crop diseases and weeds early in the season and could trigger a pestier summer. Ohio State University entomologists are keeping a close eye on insect species that survived the winter and may appear earlier and more abundantly. Particularly concerning are the pests that preyed on last year’s crops, including slugs, stink bugs and ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Computer model helps with early prediction of mycotoxins in grain

    Increased mycotoxin contamination Climate change will likely result in increased contamination of grain with mycotoxins (toxins from fungi). Early prediction of the growth of these fungi can help farmers make effective choices regarding the use of fungicides, the best harvest time and other aspects. This strategy can reduce the risk of crop failure and help to prevent contamination of ...

  • Whitefly, Disease, Drought, Unhealthy Soil, Solution Black Worm Castings!

    Spring is just around the corner, that meant it time to plant crops and start working in the garden. Unfortunately, there are several factors that can undermine all your hard work, drought, disease, unhealthy soil, and the Whitefly. Whiteflies are especially dangerous for plants. They carry many diseases and leave bend a Sooty Mold that can shut down photosynthesis and can ultimately ...


    By Vermitechnology Unlimited

  • Sentera Offers First NDVI Crop Health Maps Showing Field Contrast and Progression

    NDVI Toolbox for AgVault Offers Unprecedented Insights into Field Vigor Sentera announced the release of NDVI Toolbox for its AgVault software platform: a set of tools for customizable Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data that give growers and agronomists significant insight into field and crop health, today and throughout the season. Users can recolor, dynamically regenerate, ...


    By Sentera, LLC

  • Soil moisture for crop health topic of symposium

    Soil moisture sensing through either contact or remote technology captures soil-plant-water information that relates closely with plant water availability and use. Innovations in remote sensing technologies can inform plant health assessments and more. The “Soil Moisture Sensing for Crop Health Assessment and Management” symposium planned at the Resilience Emerging ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Sayonara, kudzu bug?

    Adam Bray has spent a lot of time with kudzu bugs. “At night I would see them crawling when I closed my eyes,” he jokes. The kudzu bug originated in east Asia and India and showed up in Georgia, Bray’s home state, in 2009. And like its viney plant namesake, the kudzu bug has earned a negative reputation. “Everybody in Georgia knows about the kudzu bug,” Bray says. ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Assessing crop damages after extreme weather

    Original story at MIT News Producing torrential rain and wind gusts exceeding 180 miles per hour as it made landfall in the Philippines, Typhoon Haiyan left more than 6,000 dead and 4 million homeless. The November 2013 storm also obliterated thousands of ...

  • Vegetable Workshop Series Offers Insight into Alternative Crops, Soil Health

    Growing hops and barley crops is an increasingly popular way to generate additional income from the farm. But before growers decide to devote some acreage to these new crops, they need to understand the costs and labor involved in growing them. Allen Gahler, an Ohio State University Extension educator in Sandusky County, said that while there is a strong and growing market for hops and barley in ...


    By Ohio State University

  • Weather Fluctuations Impact Soybeans Less Than Other Field Crops

    From freezing temperatures and snow flurries to sunny, 80-degree days in a span of a week — if this type of strange weather continues, growers across Ohio want to know, will this have a negative impact on soybean crops? Not really, according to a field crops expert in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.   Laura Lindsey, a soybean ...


    By Ohio State University

  • El Niño set to have a devastating impact on southern Africa’s harvests and food security

    Southern Africa is currently in the grip of an intense drought that has expanded and strengthened since the earliest stages of the 2015-2016 agricultural season, driven by one of the strongest El Niño events of the last 50 years. Across large swathes of Zimbabwe, Malawi, Zambia, South Africa, Mozambique, Botswana, and Madagascar, the current rainfall season has so far been the driest in ...

  • Herbicide reduction can preserve crop yields as well as biodiversity benefits of weeds

    Pesticide-sparing approaches to farming do not have to compromise on crop yields, new research suggests. A study that explored the impact of reduced herbicide use across a variety of different farming contexts found that herbicideefficient systems could be just as productive as conventional systems — and more so than organic systems — whilst having other important environmental ...

  • Weather extremes slash cereal yields

    Climate change may have already begun to take its toll of agriculture. New research suggests that drought and extreme heat in the last 50 years have reduced cereal production by up to 10%. And, for once, developed nations may have sustained greater losses than developing nations. Researchers have been warning for years that ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Insect-eating bats save global maize farmers €0.91 billion a year from crop damage

    Insect-eating bats are estimated to be worth US$ 1 billion (€0.91 billion) a year to maize farmers around the world, a new study has revealed. Not only do bats reduce crop damage by eating adult corn earworm crop pests, they also suppress fungal infections in maize ears. Bats and their habitats need to be better protected for their ecological and economic contributions, say the study’s ...

  • Europe rejects GM crops as new report highlights 20 years of failures

    All 19 government requests for bans of GM crop cultivation have gone unchallenged by biotech companies, pathing the way for two thirds of the EU’s farmland and population to remain GM-free [1]. The growing opposition to GM crops coincides with a new Greenpeace report reviewing evidence of GM environmental risks, market failures, and increased pesticide use [2]. Greenpeace EU ...


    By Greenpeace International

  • Artificial wetlands on farmland help to prevent soil loss and recapture agricultural by-products

    Small field wetlands are a simple and effective way to reduce soil erosion and nutrient pollution, recent research suggests. The authors adapted Norwegian designs for the UK environment and created a series of small rectangular lakes on the edges of agricultural fields. After three years, the wetlands had prevented tonnes of soil from leaving the land, and helped alleviate some of the nutrient ...

  • Integrating animal and crop production can reduce nutrient leaching from agricultural fields

    Nutrient leaching, the movement of plant nutrients from soil to water, can have negative effects on aquatic ecosystems due to eutrophication, which reduces the oxygen available in water, causing species and habitat loss. Ecological Recycling Agriculture (ERA), which is based on ecological principles and integrates crop production and animal husbandry, may limit this effect. This study ...

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