Grasslands News

  • Market for Grassland Equipment finds balance

    Brussels/Grieskirchen, 19 October 2018 – Manufacturers of grassland equipment look back on a very positive market in the year 2017/2018. Due to positive developments in the prices for milk products, dairy farmers and contractors invested in their equipment. The increase of roughly 12 % was unexpected and was a challenge for the manufacturers, especially as suppliers struggled to cope ...

  • Choice of winter cover crop mixture steers summer crop yield

    Scientists from Wageningen University & Research demonstrate that the productivity of a next main crop can be manipulated through the choice of species in a preceding winter cover crop mixture. They report their latest findings in the Journal of Applied Ecology of 2nd of June. With their publication, the scientist agree with recommendations of FAO to included cover crops in rotations, on top ...

  • Preserve, promote, and utilise rich soil life

    Healthy soil life can contribute to sustainable agriculture which, in addition to ensuring a good yield, keeps diseases under control and generates carbon and nitrogen retention. That is what Prof. Gerlinde De Deyn, Professor holding a personal chair in Soil Ecology, asserted in her inaugural address at Wageningen University & Research on 18 May. Life underground is richer in species than ...

  • Why Visit T-T at Grassland and Muck 2017?

    Based at Stoneleigh Park in Warwickshire on Wednesday 23rd May and Thursday 24th May, Grassland and Muck brings you innovative ways to maximise your muck. T-T are at the forefront of innovation and will have technicians on hand to discuss ways you can increase the use of your slurry, you will find T-T on stand 415 of the main trade area. T-T have a dedicated agricultural and ...


    By T-T Pumps Ltd.

  • Grassland and Muck 2017 is coming soon

    Grassland and Muck, the triennial event organised by The Royal Agricultural Society of England, returns to Stoneleigh, Warwickshire on 24-25 May 2017. The two day, 190 acre event has something for every grassland farmer with a wide display of machinery, live demonstrations and grass plots, advice and technical ...


    By Volac International Ltd.

  • Minimise your losses with best practice ensiling

    Producing good quality silage requires care and attention to both the clamp and the ensiling process. If biological processes in the clamp go wrong, this can result in average losses of 20-25%. This years  ...


    By Volac International Ltd.

  • Irish agriculture faces emissions dilemma

    Ireland is facing a classic conflict, pitching economic growth targets against the need for action on climate change. On one hand, Ireland’s planners want to see significant growth in its food and agriculture industry – a sector that is one of the main pillars of the country’s economy, accounting for about 8% of gross domestic product. On the other hand, the country − ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Intensive grassland farming could have deep effects: sequestering significantly less soil carbon

    Huge amounts of soil carbon have been discovered up to 1 metre below grassland in a recent UK study. Yet most carbon inventories do not assess soil deeper than 30 cm. Furthermore, this research suggests that intensive management of grassland, involving high rates of fertiliser use and livestock grazing, may deplete carbon at these depths. Globally, soil contains more carbon than all the ...

  • Bringing nitrogen out to pasture

    Cows in Brazil might start bellowing "leguuume" rather than "moo." That's because Jose Dubeux Jr. wants to plant more legume trees in cow pastures. Dubeux is an assistant professor of Agronomy at North Florida Research & Education Center. Growing up, Dubeux spent a lot of time on his grandparents' farm in Brazil. There he developed a passion for livestock operations and the grasslands on ...


    By American Society of Agronomy

  • Livestock goes free entry for all

    FREE ENTRY FOR ALL VISITORS  Farmers, their families and staff, farm contractors and students, consultants, vets and all in the supply trade will gain free entry to Livestock 2016.  MACHINERY MOVES INSIDE This year, following negotiations with The NEC, we have organised additional ...

  • Sustainable silage maize farming requires earlier varieties

    Dutch silage maize farmers can increase their yield in the long term by using earlier varieties. This was the conclusion reached by maize scientists at Wageningen UR based on many years of practical cultivation tests. The use of earlier varieties increases the chance that the maize will ripen properly and ensures better (soil) conditions for harvesting. Moreover, it would provide more space for ...

  • Wild Bee Decline Threatens U.S. Crop Production

    The first national study to map U.S. wild bees suggests they’re disappearing in many of the country’s most important farmlands — including California’s Central Valley, the Midwest’s corn belt and the Mississippi River valley. If losses of these crucial pollinators continue, the new nationwide assessment indicates that farmers will face increasing costs — and ...


    By University of Vermont

  • Use of residues from agriculture and forestry as energy source improves food security

    The sustainability of growing crops for use as energy sources has been disputed for many years. A potentially attractive alternative is to use waste and residues from agricultural and forestry. However, using waste and other residues may have an impact on land use, biodiversity and food security. The additional sources of income from the sale of waste and other residues could prompt an increase ...

  • Combating pest insects in the soil with root-colonizing insecticidal fungi

    The biological control of pest insects in the soil has come one step closer. Wageningen UR has isolated five promising fungi that kill 90 to 100 per cent of the grubs and crane fly larvae, and which also survive well in the soil when there are no pest insects present. It is expected that these insecticidal fungi will also be effective against other pest insects in the soil. Surviving ...

  • Pesticides may harm wild bees but natural areas can mitigate effects

    The use of pesticides in orchards may be threatening populations of wild bees, which are important pollinators that increase crop productivity, a new study concludes. However, the damage was mitigated in areas where the orchards were surrounded by natural landscapes, such as deciduous forests. Pollinators, such as bees, provide an important and often underappreciated ecosystem service to ...

  • Simple method to estimate soil carbon stocks in grassland

    Storage of carbon in soil helps to keep land fertile and regulates the climate, and is therefore an important ecosystem service. However, mapping of soil carbon stocks currently uses unreliable measures. This study used data from a national survey of English grasslands to show that soil carbon stocks can be accurately predicted using simple measures of soil and climatic conditions. Two to three ...

  • High-nature-value grasslands can be maintained by alternating between mowing and grazing

    Scientists recommend policies that alternate between mowing and grazing to manage Europe’s high-nature-value grasslands. This comes after a new seven-year study found that a high plant-species diversity helps grasslands to maintain productivity and to resist depletion of phosphorus caused by livestock grazing and depletion of potassium caused by mowing. Grasslands with high levels of ...

  • Silage harvesting partly responsible for decline in skylarks

    Farmland birds like skylarks are attracted to nest in agricultural grassland, but repeated harvesting for silage causes most nests to fail. This study showed that skylark breeding success in silage was too low to sustain local populations. The researchers say that grass silage is a hostile environment for breeding skylarks and conservation efforts should focus on making other parts of the ...

  • Rise in CO2 could restrict growing days for crops

    The positive consequences of climate change may not be so positive. Although plants in the colder regions are expected to thrive as average global temperatures rise, even this benefit could be limited. Some tropical regions could lose up to 200 growing days a year, and more than two billion rural people could see their hopes wither on the vine or in the field. Even in temperate zones, there will ...


    By Climate News Network

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